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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/6/2005 11:30:18 PM EDT
I ordered a new Generator , it is a tri-fuel model that will run on ,gas ,propane or natural gas.
Has anyone ever hooked up a propane model to run in your basement instead of always rolling it outside. And how safe is it.
thanks
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 11:31:27 PM EDT
uhhh...do you have it exhausting inside your home or though a pipe to the outdoors?
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 11:35:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By gaspain:
uhhh...do you have it exhausting inside your home or though a pipe to the outdoors?



+1

Link Posted: 9/6/2005 11:37:14 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2005 11:39:15 PM EDT by TheTracker]
Of course I would do that. Im asking if anyone has done that with a propane one.Most are aircooled and was wondering if it would be a problem in the basement .
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 11:39:47 PM EDT
Yeah. if your lips start turning bright red, it's time to open a window...

Run an exhaust pipe outside and get one of those CO detectors..

Link Posted: 9/6/2005 11:45:35 PM EDT
Propane produces a lot less CO than gasoline or diesel - which is why it is used to power floor scrubber engines and forklifts in indoor commercial enviornments.

However, those applications only call for intermittent use (just a few minutes to a few hours per day), and are typically inside huge buildings (much larger than a residence).

Typically, a generator will be required to run continously, for many days on end. Placed inside a residence without a steady, high volume of ventilation , it will most certainly kill you.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 11:54:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Skibane:
Propane produces a lot less CO than gasoline or diesel - which is why it is used to power floor scrubber engines and forklifts in indoor commercial enviornments.

However, those applications only call for intermittent use (just a few minutes to a few hours per day), and are typically inside huge buildings (much larger than a residence).

Typically, a generator will be required to run continously, for many days on end. Placed inside a residence without a steady, high volume of ventilation , it will most certainly kill you.



just hook up an exhaust and a CO detector and you are good to go. The fire dept might require an inspection and a brick pad that it would be placed on.
Link Posted: 9/7/2005 12:01:21 AM EDT

Originally Posted By gaspain:

Originally Posted By Skibane:
Propane produces a lot less CO than gasoline or diesel - which is why it is used to power floor scrubber engines and forklifts in indoor commercial enviornments.

However, those applications only call for intermittent use (just a few minutes to a few hours per day), and are typically inside huge buildings (much larger than a residence).

Typically, a generator will be required to run continously, for many days on end. Placed inside a residence without a steady, high volume of ventilation , it will most certainly kill you.



just hook up an exhaust and a CO detector and you are good to go. The fire dept might require an inspection and a brick pad that it would be placed on.



Thats what I thought too. Good idea about asking the fire department. It still hasn't come in yet.I just hope the noise level on it isn't to bad being in the basement. From what I read the hondas are not that noisey, I hope it's 20 horse
Link Posted: 9/7/2005 12:03:00 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Skibane:
Propane produces a lot less CO than gasoline or diesel - which is why it is used to power floor scrubber engines and forklifts in indoor commercial enviornments.

However, those applications only call for intermittent use (just a few minutes to a few hours per day), and are typically inside huge buildings (much larger than a residence).

Typically, a generator will be required to run continously, for many days on end. Placed inside a residence without a steady, high volume of ventilation , it will most certainly kill you.


Those Zamboni machines used to groom ice rink ice also uses propane.

But I would be concerned what happens if you run out of propane, and have to use another fuel such as gasoline, in that case you would have to move your genny outside?
Link Posted: 9/7/2005 12:12:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By warlord:

Originally Posted By Skibane:
Propane produces a lot less CO than gasoline or diesel - which is why it is used to power floor scrubber engines and forklifts in indoor commercial enviornments.

However, those applications only call for intermittent use (just a few minutes to a few hours per day), and are typically inside huge buildings (much larger than a residence).

Typically, a generator will be required to run continously, for many days on end. Placed inside a residence without a steady, high volume of ventilation , it will most certainly kill you.


Those Zamboni machines used to groom ice rink ice also uses propane.

But I would be concerned what happens if you run out of propane, and have to use another fuel such as gasoline, in that case you would have to move your genny outside?



What I was going to do was get the large propane tank and that would be stored outside and run a feed line to the generator threw a small hole I will cut in my basement window. Even with the propane I will run a exhaust. I dont want a gas motor running in the basement even with a exhaust. If I ran out of propane it goes outside and I fill it with gas.
Link Posted: 9/7/2005 12:15:14 AM EDT
Despite what you may see, running ANY internal combustion engine indoors is ASKING for trouble. Yes, a propan floor buffer is cool FOR A MINUTE but not for hours. Even a ventless propane fireplace is bad news for extended time.

Duct the exhaust outside and by all means, GET A CO DETECTOR!
Link Posted: 9/7/2005 12:16:24 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/7/2005 12:17:01 AM EDT by Confederate]
How does the tri-fuel work? How much effort does it take to go from one fuel type to another?
Link Posted: 9/7/2005 12:24:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Confederate:
How does the tri-fuel work? How much effort does it take to go from one fuel type to another?




It will change it self over automaticly if the propane runs out , the gas will then feed in with out it turning off . It might be more then I needed for power but this will run my entire house pretty much.
20 horse for a portable is big. But I said the hell with it and pulled out the plastic today
Link Posted: 9/7/2005 12:25:08 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TheTracker:

Originally Posted By warlord:

Originally Posted By Skibane:
Propane produces a lot less CO than gasoline or diesel - which is why it is used to power floor scrubber engines and forklifts in indoor commercial enviornments.

However, those applications only call for intermittent use (just a few minutes to a few hours per day), and are typically inside huge buildings (much larger than a residence).

Typically, a generator will be required to run continously, for many days on end. Placed inside a residence without a steady, high volume of ventilation , it will most certainly kill you.


Those Zamboni machines used to groom ice rink ice also uses propane.

But I would be concerned what happens if you run out of propane, and have to use another fuel such as gasoline, in that case you would have to move your genny outside?



What I was going to do was get the large propane tank and that would be stored outside and run a feed line to the generator threw a small hole I will cut in my basement window. Even with the propane I will run a exhaust. I dont want a gas motor running in the basement even with a exhaust. If I ran out of propane it goes outside and I fill it with gas.


What part of the USA do you live, would the genny heat up your place? If you live in FL after a hurricane it would make your place even more uncomfortable, but if you live in one of the colder climates and you power goes out during a blizzard or snow storm in the winter time, it could help heat your house. But you would have to duct in also fresh air for your generator. Also would there be enough air circulation to prevent overheating of your generator?
Link Posted: 9/7/2005 12:29:27 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/7/2005 12:31:02 AM EDT by TheTracker]
New England
That was one of my first questions ,it is air cooled
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