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Posted: 1/2/2007 1:38:51 AM EDT
Say if you wanted a new plastic mold made from scratch , what kind of cash do you need to come up with ?
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 1:46:33 AM EDT
[#1]
thats a hard question , ive used molds that cost 200k and some that were 25k . what is it?






688
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 1:50:59 AM EDT
[#2]
I just unintentionally made some Wonder Bread mold in my frige. IM me your address, and it's yours.
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 1:52:09 AM EDT
[#3]
A VFG design .

ETA . If it wasn't for that pesky penicillin allergy I would be all over that .
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 1:53:02 AM EDT
[#4]

Quoted:
I just unintentionally made some Wonder Bread mold in my frige. IM me your address, and it's yours.



Link Posted: 1/2/2007 1:54:05 AM EDT
[#5]

Quoted:
A VFG design .


ok , so what the heck is that .



688
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 1:57:53 AM EDT
[#6]

Quoted:

Quoted:
A VFG design .


ok , so what the heck is that .



688

A Vertical Fore Grip .
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 1:59:35 AM EDT
[#7]

Quoted:

Quoted:
A VFG design .


ok , so what the heck is that .



688


I'm guessing vertical front grip?

I'm curious about the answer to this question too, as I have a few things I'd like to design for injection molding.
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 2:04:00 AM EDT
[#8]

Quoted:
Say if you wanted a new plastic mold made from scratch , what kind of cash do you need to come up with ?


Google injection molding for some companies.  Call them for quotes, given rough dimensions and surface complexity.  Knowing desired material helps too.

I'll tell you this: for a prototype casting, it's going to be really, really expensive.
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 2:12:53 AM EDT
[#9]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
A VFG design .


ok , so what the heck is that .



688

A Vertical Fore Grip .


ill take a guess at around 50k to 60k and produce  3 to 6 at a time . you really need to take a prototype
and sketch to somebody that does only molds .



688
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 2:26:43 AM EDT
[#10]
Do you have a decent sketch or technical drawing?  This would greatly improve your chances of getting an accurate quote.

If you don't have one, I would volunteer to produce a CAD drawing.

Just to put your mind at ease about theft of intellectual property, I've been doing engineering design/technical rendering for a major semiconductor firm for 10 years, and all the background checks and multiple CNDA's that implies.

Just a thought.
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 3:23:35 AM EDT
[#11]
For a family mold (4 or 6 parts for each shot) with a single material that is tooled here in the states you are looking at 40 to 50k.



Edit - do you have high resolution SLA prototypes in hand?  (Or SLS or whatever method the rapid prototype shop in your area uses) - If not, get a few to try fit and function.
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 3:50:49 AM EDT
[#12]
look into the "lost wax method" works great for aluminum or brass.
it shouldnt be to hard for certain kinds of plastics either,  is rather inexpensive too boot also.
ive had replacement  rifle triggers made this way and it was only around $30 IIRC

if your looking at making mabey one or two instead of a shit load of them, might be the way to go.
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 4:44:54 AM EDT
[#13]

Quoted:
Do you have a decent sketch or technical drawing?  This would greatly improve your chances of getting an accurate quote.
If you don't have one, I would volunteer to produce a CAD drawing.

Just to put your mind at ease about theft of intellectual property, I've been doing engineering design/technical rendering for a major semiconductor firm for 10 years, and all the background checks and multiple CNDA's that implies.

Just a thought.


Correct.
I get phone calls all the time with people asking "How much for an injection
mold?" My responce is, call a mechanic and tell them you have a weird sound coming
from your car how much will it cost to fix it?  Until to get accurate details getting quotes
on a mold is not even close to what the bottom line will be by the time the first chip flies.
I build molds from anywhere between 3k to 100k.  It's all dependent on do you have
drawing or do we have to make drawings,  how many parts does the customer  expect/hope to make will determine if we make the mold out of aluminum or steel.
And most of all,  if you think the molds are expensive wait until you see what it cost
to market a product.
Having drawings done from a distance is usually fine with good communication but
you should have a mold built near you or with a representive to keep an eye
on the progress and quality of the tooling.

I'm sure there are a lot of other people that can give you good information and help you on how to move forward with your project.  I've been a moldmaker for 33 years and in business for 27 years.  

p.s.  The lost wax works great with metal but not too well with plastics,  at least not that I've seen.  

Good luck with your project.

Joe
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 4:57:12 AM EDT
[#14]
I use to work in a pattern and mold shop about 10 years ago.  I can tell you that even small molds are REALLY expensive.  I would say that you are looking at $10K-$20K.  The other thing is that these are not Plug-N-Play machines.  Most plastic molding machines need 480V heaters to melt the plastic, hydraulic systems to run the ram and punch pins and lots of plastic to feed the mold.

I would think that you would be much much better off to sell the idea to a manufacturer.
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 5:20:30 AM EDT
[#15]

Quoted:

Quoted:
Do you have a decent sketch or technical drawing?  This would greatly improve your chances of getting an accurate quote.
If you don't have one, I would volunteer to produce a CAD drawing.

Just to put your mind at ease about theft of intellectual property, I've been doing engineering design/technical rendering for a major semiconductor firm for 10 years, and all the background checks and multiple CNDA's that implies.

Just a thought.


Correct.
I get phone calls all the time with people asking "How much for an injection
mold?" My responce is, call a mechanic and tell them you have a weird sound coming
from your car how much will it cost to fix it?  Until to get accurate details getting quotes
on a mold is not even close to what the bottom line will be by the time the first chip flies.
I build molds from anywhere between 3k to 100k.  It's all dependent on do you have
drawing or do we have to make drawings,  how many parts does the customer  expect/hope to make will determine if we make the mold out of aluminum or steel.
And most of all,  if you think the molds are expensive wait until you see what it cost
to market a product.
Having drawings done from a distance is usually fine with good communication but
you should have a mold built near you or with a representive to keep an eye
on the progress and quality of the tooling.

I'm sure there are a lot of other people that can give you good information and help you on how to move forward with your project.  I've been a moldmaker for 33 years and in business for 27 years.  

p.s.  The lost wax works great with metal but not too well with plastics,  at least not that I've seen.  

Good luck with your project.

Joe



I do not see how you wold do plastic in lost wax?  I have never seen a LW mold that did not involve high heat to set the investment.
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 5:35:12 AM EDT
[#16]
If you only want a couple (or one) then you might want to look into stereo lithography - some of the resins are pretty strong these days and if you produce your own CAD files then it won't cost too much.

Linkage
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 5:42:25 AM EDT
[#17]
   Prototype mold made from filled Epoxy, simple parting line, no inserts, just 2 parts you would screw together can be had in the $3-$5,000.00 range. This will give you from 5 to 1000 parts depending on the material used.
   Now you need someone to do a sample run. I sample for a couple of local shops and charge a $250.00 setup free for a 100 Ton press plus $75.00 per hour machine time and you supply the material.
   Getting a plastic part made/molded is not an easy/cheap process.

Link Posted: 1/2/2007 5:44:35 AM EDT
[#18]

Quoted:


I do not see how you wold do plastic in lost wax?  I have never seen a LW mold that did not involve high heat to set the investment.


 There are some two part casting Polymers, but, they are a pain to work with and not very durable.
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 6:09:50 AM EDT
[#19]

Quoted:

Quoted:
Do you have a decent sketch or technical drawing?  This would greatly improve your chances of getting an accurate quote.
If you don't have one, I would volunteer to produce a CAD drawing.


Just a thought.


Correct.
Having drawings done from a distance is usually fine with good communication but
you should have a mold built near you or with a representive to keep an eye
on the progress and quality of the tooling.

I'm sure there are a lot of other people that can give you good information and help you on how to move forward with your project.  I've been a moldmaker for 33 years and in business for 27 years.  

Good luck with your project.

Joe

If your new to the manufacturing game Best to Gleen everything you can from people in the trade like Proto Joe, You need to understand  the difference between "class A tools and prototype tools, Many inventors have had thier dreams smashed by going into a shop that only does class A tooling and quoted $35,000 for a single cavity tool that will never make more than 1000 parts, Go to a prototype shop and the same tool can be made from aluminum for $3500 and will make 10's of thousands of parts no problem. knowledge is the most important tool in the manufacturing arsenal!
P.S. to Proto Joe, I'll be a little late this morning
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 6:13:31 AM EDT
[#20]
In many cases,  it's much more economical to have parts machined from solid stock than it is to have them molded.  

In the case of a VFG, that's, what,  a 50 dollar part, tops?   (I'd think that was a bit high, myself.)    If mold tooling and setup alone cost you 10,000 dollars, which seems to be
a reasonable figure,  you'd have to sell 200 just to break even on those costs,  which isn't many...but only if you have a venue to sell them from.     And that's just the raw costs
of molding them.   There are many other business expenses to take into account.


A tool and die maker I know well once said that it's not worth going the custom molded
part route unless you really expect to sell 10,000 units at the minimum.   Since he worked
in the mold shop for a large corporation,   I doubt he's just blowing smoke.


I had considered having a part molded to my specs some years ago, and this is when
I found out about this.    And my parts would have needed a complex set of molds that
would have easily topped 100K to build.  (At least five separate multi-part molds.)


CJ
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 6:38:51 AM EDT
[#21]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
Do you have a decent sketch or technical drawing?  This would greatly improve your chances of getting an accurate quote.
If you don't have one, I would volunteer to produce a CAD drawing.


Just a thought.


Correct.
Having drawings done from a distance is usually fine with good communication but
you should have a mold built near you or with a representive to keep an eye
on the progress and quality of the tooling.

I'm sure there are a lot of other people that can give you good information and help you on how to move forward with your project.  I've been a moldmaker for 33 years and in business for 27 years.  

Good luck with your project.

Joe

If your new to the manufacturing game Best to Gleen everything you can from people in the trade like Proto Joe, You need to understand  the difference between "class A tools and prototype tools, Many inventors have had thier dreams smashed by going into a shop that only does class A tooling and quoted $35,000 for a single cavity tool that will never make more than 1000 parts, Go to a prototype shop and the same tool can be made from aluminum for $3500 and will make 10's of thousands of parts no problem. knowledge is the most important tool in the manufacturing arsenal!
P.S. to Proto Joe, I'll be a little late this morning


Also Kodiak-AK as you deal with moldmakers and the plastic industry you will begin to repeat what many have said under their breath,

MOLDMAKERS ARE A PAIN IN THE ASS!
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 6:39:57 AM EDT
[#22]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
A VFG design .


ok , so what the heck is that .



688

A Vertical Fore Grip .


U should try to sculpt one yourself and make your own mold
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 6:47:17 AM EDT
[#23]
I know what some molds cost.


Now, what is it you want to make, what molding process do you want to use?
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 6:49:06 AM EDT
[#24]
Make a couple of prototypes, make them popular and sell them for a high price, Then in a couple of days the Chineese will have exact knockoffs made and be selling them for 10% of what your design sells for.
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 1:34:01 PM EDT
[#25]

Quoted:
Make a couple of prototypes, make them popular and sell them for a high price, Then in a couple of days the Chineese will have exact knockoffs made and be selling them for 10% of what your design sells for.
Excellent point. No need for innovation or anything eh?


ETA .
And thank you everyone for the help . I am going to make a prototype by hand and than sit down with a local artist to get spec drawings before I decide what to do from there.
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 1:38:05 PM EDT
[#26]

Quoted:
...Then in a couple of days the Chineese will have exact knockoffs made and be selling them for 10% of what your design sells for.


And they'll have a quite a following in the EE.
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 1:50:55 PM EDT
[#27]
My buddy runs a rapid prototyping firm. He has a machine that "prints" objects from CAD files. If you can make use of this kind of service, let me know and I can get you in touch with him.
Link Posted: 1/2/2007 2:07:16 PM EDT
[#28]
Thanks...Me thinks I'll go for some sushi myself!    
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