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Posted: 10/11/2007 11:35:58 AM EST
Big Brother Strikes AGAIN!! What were 'they' thinking ???

www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,301040,00.html

This makes you want to slap somebody. Dont know which I hate worse...the person that came up with the idea or the Sheepletards that are carrying it out!!

Excellent article though


Link Posted: 10/11/2007 11:38:27 AM EST
Lol, "Doctors". If there is no research/scientific associated PhD involved, they are glorified nurses.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 11:40:06 AM EST
nice find
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 11:41:07 AM EST
The fucking libtards will use any angle they can, including turning our children against us. The Soviets used the same methods.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 11:43:40 AM EST
Fuck doctors.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 11:46:46 AM EST
height=8
Originally Posted By justinwb:
Fuck doctors.


he
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 11:46:47 AM EST

Doctors across the United States are being advised to interrogate children about mom and dad’s "bad" behavior.

It sounds simple enough, but the problem is that the advice ignores the benefits and exaggerates the costs of gun ownership.

Take a recent example from Massachusetts that was discussed in the Boston Herald:

"Debbie is a mom from Uxbridge who was in the examination room when the pediatrician asked her 5-year-old, 'Does Daddy own a gun?'

"When the little girl said yes, the doctor began grilling her and her mom about the number and type of guns, how they are stored, etc.

"If the incident had ended there, it would have merely been annoying.

"But when a friend in law enforcement let Debbie know that her doctor had filed a report with the police about her family’s (entirely legal) gun ownership, she got mad."


Ummmm... Isn't that illegal? How can a doctor disclose patient information? Did the doctor assert that the child was in immediate danger?
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 11:50:39 AM EST

Originally Posted By schizrade:
Lol, "Doctors". If there is no research/scientific associated PhD involved, they are glorified nurses.


Jealousy is such an ugly emotion.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 11:52:30 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/11/2007 11:52:55 AM EST by Bob1984]
I'm not surprised. The question just keeps popping up on medical questionnaires these days. I simply lie and instruct others to lie as well. There is no law that says you are required to provide this information to medical personnel. I already don't like going to doctors; costs too much money and it's too much of a hassle. This just gives me yet another reason not to go. I'd rather try to self-treat or just ignore my medical problems (I have plenty) than deal with this bullshit.

Link Posted: 10/11/2007 11:52:36 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 11:53:59 AM EST

Originally Posted By HUMONGO:
The fucking libtards will use any angle they can, including turning our children against us. The Soviets used the same methods.


+1
The next cold war isnt going to be between U.S. and Russia.....its going to be between the Americans and their .gov
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 11:54:43 AM EST
I learned an interesting statistic which I'm gonna ask for a source in my next LE grad class.

There are 700,000 physicians in the US now. 150,000 accidental deaths occur each year from physicians.

There are 80 million gun owners in the US now. 1500 accidental deaths occur each year from guns.


Who do you trust?
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 11:55:03 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/11/2007 11:57:31 AM EST by Bob1984]

Originally Posted By C-4:

Originally Posted By schizrade:
Lol, "Doctors". If there is no research/scientific associated PhD involved, they are glorified nurses.


Jealousy is such an ugly emotion.


For what it's worth, most of the medical procedures I've had done on me have been done by nurses, nurse practitioners and physician's assistants under the guidance of a doctor.


Originally Posted By medicmandan:

HIPPA requirements, as explained in our yearly training, specifically prohibit the sharing of any patient information. It does not specify that it be health related. The only exceptions to this are requirements to report abuse.


That's just the thing; it's extremely easy to spin the mere ownership of weapons into an "abuse" or "child in danger" case if someone wants to.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 11:56:17 AM EST

Originally Posted By C-4:

Originally Posted By schizrade:
Lol, "Doctors". If there is no research/scientific associated PhD involved, they are glorified nurses.


Jealousy is such an ugly emotion.


Lol, not hardly. Glorified Nurses.

I have my degrees.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 11:57:56 AM EST
my doctor *bought* an XCR because of me. Lol.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 11:58:25 AM EST

Originally Posted By medicmandan:

Originally Posted By efpeter:

Doctors across the United States are being advised to interrogate children about mom and dad’s "bad" behavior.

It sounds simple enough, but the problem is that the advice ignores the benefits and exaggerates the costs of gun ownership.

Take a recent example from Massachusetts that was discussed in the Boston Herald:

"Debbie is a mom from Uxbridge who was in the examination room when the pediatrician asked her 5-year-old, 'Does Daddy own a gun?'

"When the little girl said yes, the doctor began grilling her and her mom about the number and type of guns, how they are stored, etc.

"If the incident had ended there, it would have merely been annoying.

"But when a friend in law enforcement let Debbie know that her doctor had filed a report with the police about her family’s (entirely legal) gun ownership, she got mad."


Ummmm... Isn't that illegal? How can a doctor disclose patient information? Did the doctor assert that the child was in immediate danger?


HIPPA requirements, as explained in our yearly training, specifically prohibit the sharing of any patient information. It does not specify that it be health related. The only exceptions to this are requirements to report abuse.


I'm guessing mal. prac. ins. doesn't cover violating someones civil rights. It will be interesting to see what becomes of this bull$hit.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 11:59:57 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 12:02:22 PM EST
That is why all of you with children need to talk to your kids, and tell them that there are things that are private family matters.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 12:02:51 PM EST
This is not new, and comes up every few years.

The term you are looking for is "Ethical Boundary Violation". There is a release form floating around that you should give your doctor to sign if he tries that stunt. Basically it informs the Doc that they are providing safety advice while unqualified to do so.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 12:04:29 PM EST

HIPPA requirements, as explained in our yearly training, specifically prohibit the sharing of any patient information. It does not specify that it be health related. The only exceptions to this are requirements to report abuse.



My best friend is a family practitioner, hes also is an avid shooter. Just told him about this and he couldnt believe it! Said he'd be telling the sheeple where to go! He agrees that its a direct conflict of Doc/patient confidentiality
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 12:05:29 PM EST
Reason #472 why I don't have kids and never will.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 12:16:28 PM EST

Originally Posted By medicmandan:
HIPPA requirements, as explained in our yearly training, specifically prohibit the sharing of any patient information. It does not specify that it be health related. The only exceptions to this are requirements to report abuse.


I am no expert on the subject but my understanding is that HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) prevents disclosure of PHI (Personal Health Information). I do not recall or have handy the statutory definition of PHI.

I believe most jurisdictions also recognize various degrees of confidentiality under the common law to the extent not pre-empted (are any not pre-empted?? I dunno) by HIPAA.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 1:07:56 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/11/2007 1:08:33 PM EST by Badass03]
If the dems win in 08 it will only get worse

ETA: If the dems dont win it will still probably get worse
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 1:11:46 PM EST
I'm wearing an ARFcom T-shirt to my next Doc-in-the-box appointment!
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 1:19:23 PM EST
Hell I conceal carry to all my doc visits... Lots of fun when they pull up the shirt.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 2:49:22 PM EST
Hell, some nurse peaked at George Clooney's medical file and it was on the cable news shows for two days.

Doctors working in cooperation with law enforcement to disarm citizens hardly makes news anywhere.

Link Posted: 10/11/2007 3:28:43 PM EST

Originally Posted By XCRmonger:
my doctor *bought* an XCR because of me. Lol.


sweet
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 3:31:19 PM EST

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:

Originally Posted By fivepointoh:
I learned an interesting statistic which I'm gonna ask for a source in my next LE grad class.

There are 700,000 physicians in the US now. 150,000 accidental deaths occur each year from physicians.

There are 80 million gun owners in the US now. 1500 accidental deaths occur each year from guns.


Who do you trust?


How many times a day does the average doctor make important decisions that coudl result in death - including surgery, medications prescriptions, dosage, triage, etc.

How many times a day does the average gun owner handle or fire his gun?


The "batting average" for the doctors is probably quite impressive if you are comparing the relevant rates.


I find his comparison much less dubious than the typical antigunners attempts fwiw. John Lott makes a similar case in the bias against guns...
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 3:32:38 PM EST
Hmmm, never know what ARFCOM DAOTD (Doc Attitude of the Day) is going to be....

A Docs are evil and want to steal my guns and bankrupt me.
B What antibiotic for SHTF shouid I stock?
C Any docs online tonite? What is this.......

I guess "A" wins tonight.


Originally Posted By fivepointoh:
I learned an interesting statistic which I'm gonna ask for a source in my next LE grad class.

There are 700,000 physicians in the US now. 150,000 accidental deaths occur each year from physicians.

There are 80 million gun owners in the US now. 1500 accidental deaths occur each year from guns.


Who do you trust?


Let's compare apples to apples, or at least try.

Assume the 700K docs see just one really sick patient per week and have to make the right decisions or the patient dies. That would be over 35 million "critical" decisions per year. And that just assumes ONE really sick patient per week.

Now, take 700K gun owners and make them fire 35 million rounds at a NRA target at 100 yds. Anytime, day or night, after being up 18+ hours at work, rain or shine. Any shot outside the 10 ring equals a dead patient.

As you stated so eloquently, "Who are you going to trust?"


Originally Posted By schizrade:
Lol, "Doctors". If there is no research/scientific associated PhD involved, they are glorified nurses.


It's not to late to apply again.



Link Posted: 10/11/2007 3:37:29 PM EST
Gun toting trauma surgeon here.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 3:41:11 PM EST

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
It's an interesting question for sure.

That said, many woudl argue that it's probably also a LOT easier to handle a gun without shooting someone accidentally than it is to perform surgery, or distinguish between a bad flu and a viral menegitis infection in the early stages, etc.

A doctor's job is pretty heard, whereas I've always found it pretty easy to not shoot myself in the foot, or shoot other people at the range.


Well, you hit the nail on the head.

Handling a gun is intrinsically safe as long as you follow the 4 Golden Rules and never shoot someone else's reloads.

We don't have a crystal ball so there is no way to know who will go on to develop a particular complication. That's why you tell people to 'come back if it gets worse' and 'wear a condom the next time you're with her'.

Link Posted: 10/11/2007 3:43:58 PM EST
My doctor ask me that same question. My new responses are going to be "why you know someone who needs killing", "does and AK47 count", "what about machine guns", "is a suprressor considered a firearm", "somewhere around 100, not including the ones under my bed", and finally "does a 12 gauge and a bag full of shells under my bed count?".
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 3:44:01 PM EST

Originally Posted By GroundFire201:
Gun toting trauma surgeon here.


They had a trauma surgeon on TV a couple of years ago. They were showing him at the range having some fun. The reporter got very frustrated with the interview.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 3:46:32 PM EST

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:

Originally Posted By fivepointoh:
I learned an interesting statistic which I'm gonna ask for a source in my next LE grad class.

There are 700,000 physicians in the US now. 150,000 accidental deaths occur each year from physicians.

There are 80 million gun owners in the US now. 1500 accidental deaths occur each year from guns.


Who do you trust?


How many times a day does the average doctor make important decisions that coudl result in death - including surgery, medications prescriptions, dosage, triage, etc.

How many times a day does the average gun owner handle or fire his gun?


The "batting average" for the doctors is probably quite impressive if you are comparing the relevant rates.


While much of what you said is true, the fact is too many of the mistakes doctors make are easily reduced.

Quite a few people die because of poor handwriting on prescriptions.

What sort of baboon "doctor" writes a prescription by hand? It has to be recorded in a computer anyway. It's faster to enter it directly into the computer and then print it out. It is especially faster, considering that refills may have to be issued in the future. MY allergist gives me printed prescriptions. Printing dramatically reduces error.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 3:49:29 PM EST
Do you own any guns?

Only the ones I find on my victims.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:36:37 PM EST
Interesting article, I would instruct my kids to reply to such a question with "none of your business, next question?".
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:39:46 PM EST
i believe my exact words to my kids pediatrician were: "it's none of your god-damned buissiness!"

the doc left it at that.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 4:59:46 PM EST

Originally Posted By C-4:

Originally Posted By Houstons_Problem:
What sort of baboon "doctor" writes a prescription by hand? It has to be recorded in a computer anyway. It's faster to enter it directly into the computer and then print it out. It is especially faster, considering that refills may have to be issued in the future. MY allergist gives me printed prescriptions. Printing dramatically reduces error.


How about the three patients who used drugs I prescribed them to commit suicide because they downed the whole bottle? Would better handwriting have 'reduced errors'?i76.photobucket.com/albums/j33/C-4C/poke.gif


First of all, I don't see how three patients who downed an entire bottle of medicine on purpose to commit suicide relieves you of your duty to reduce prescription errors.

Fact is, poor handwriting kills. We have computers now that have been proven to reduce errors. Studies have been done that prove this and recommend that handwritten prescriptions be eliminated.

There was a time when doctors killed their customers because they didn't wash their hands. Now the information age has been upon us for more than two decades and you are defending the practice of writing scripts with illegible handwriting when errors can be avoided and records kept efficiently by computer. Computer files can easily be backed up by tape and protected from fire and other disasters. Computer files can be accessed easily in emergencies from remote location.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 5:00:33 PM EST

Originally Posted By DuraToTheMax:
Interesting article, I would instruct my kids to reply to such a question with "none of your business, next question?".


If I had kids, I'd probably instruct them to lie and say "no" if anyone asks if there's guns in the house.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 5:01:46 PM EST

Originally Posted By Houstons_Problem:

Originally Posted By C-4:

Originally Posted By Houstons_Problem:
What sort of baboon "doctor" writes a prescription by hand? It has to be recorded in a computer anyway. It's faster to enter it directly into the computer and then print it out. It is especially faster, considering that refills may have to be issued in the future. MY allergist gives me printed prescriptions. Printing dramatically reduces error.


How about the three patients who used drugs I prescribed them to commit suicide because they downed the whole bottle? Would better handwriting have 'reduced errors'?i76.photobucket.com/albums/j33/C-4C/poke.gif


First of all, I don't see how three patients who downed an entire bottle of medicine on purpose to commit suicide relieves you of your duty to reduce prescription errors.

Fact is, poor handwriting kills. We have computers now that have been proven to reduce errors. Studies have been done that prove this and recommend that handwritten prescriptions be eliminated.

There was a time when doctors killed their customers because they didn't wash their hands. Now the information age has been upon us for more than two decades and you are defending the practice of writing scripts with illegible handwriting when errors can be avoided and records kept efficiently by computer. Computer files can easily be backed up by tape and protected from fire and other disasters. Computer files can be accessed easily in emergencies from remote location.


Umm...I've never seen a computerized prescription, only the standard hand-written ones.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 5:38:39 PM EST
they are are trying to create a society of fear in america, and they will indoctrinate our children to beleive this is the way its always been through gov schools, and apparently healthcare now (w/ hillarycare it will be bad). w/ the fine help of the nra, doctors are now given the power to deem who is mentally fit to own a gun. if the gov gets control of healthcare they will launch an all out war on guns as soon as they have the pieces in place.

{reinforced tinfoil hat on}
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 5:39:10 PM EST

Originally Posted By Bubbatheredneck:

Originally Posted By Houstons_Problem:

Originally Posted By C-4:

Originally Posted By Houstons_Problem:
What sort of baboon "doctor" writes a prescription by hand? It has to be recorded in a computer anyway. It's faster to enter it directly into the computer and then print it out. It is especially faster, considering that refills may have to be issued in the future. MY allergist gives me printed prescriptions. Printing dramatically reduces error.


How about the three patients who used drugs I prescribed them to commit suicide because they downed the whole bottle? Would better handwriting have 'reduced errors'?i76.photobucket.com/albums/j33/C-4C/poke.gif


First of all, I don't see how three patients who downed an entire bottle of medicine on purpose to commit suicide relieves you of your duty to reduce prescription errors.

Fact is, poor handwriting kills. We have computers now that have been proven to reduce errors. Studies have been done that prove this and recommend that handwritten prescriptions be eliminated.

There was a time when doctors killed their customers because they didn't wash their hands. Now the information age has been upon us for more than two decades and you are defending the practice of writing scripts with illegible handwriting when errors can be avoided and records kept efficiently by computer. Computer files can easily be backed up by tape and protected from fire and other disasters. Computer files can be accessed easily in emergencies from remote location.


The downside to electronic records etc, is that the last tiny true shred of privacy that still exists in this country is the notes your doctor writes about you in your paper medical record. When that is reduced to a standardized electronic format, those that PAY your medical bills and want to "insure quality care" LOL, ie the .gov and the insurance company, will mine that data and any that bit of privacy is gone forever.
Funny how no one ever seems to mention this.
The only ones demanding electronic records are those that write the checks. And dont think they give a darn about you.





Prescription information is already recorded electronically by the insurance company, if they pay for it and also by the government in many cases to prevent drug abuse.

Drug names are often very similar, doctor's handwriting is notoriously sloppy and prescription error is common.

Between 1.5 to 1.3 million people each year are harmed by medication errors each year in the United States. Several hundred to Several thousand people are killed each year by medication error depending on whose report you go.

I have had wrong dosage information given to me because of the way a prescription was written. I knew it was wrong before taking a single pill, but the only reason I knew it was wrong is because it was easy for me to understand what the doctor had actually wanted me to take. I might not have been so lucky if the actual drug is wrong. Some medicine names are long or difficult to understand, throw in generics with different names and you could easily be given the wrong medicine and not catch on to it.

Link Posted: 10/11/2007 6:20:59 PM EST

Originally Posted By Bubbatheredneck:

Originally Posted By Houstons_Problem:

Originally Posted By C-4:

Originally Posted By Houstons_Problem:
What sort of baboon "doctor" writes a prescription by hand? It has to be recorded in a computer anyway. It's faster to enter it directly into the computer and then print it out. It is especially faster, considering that refills may have to be issued in the future. MY allergist gives me printed prescriptions. Printing dramatically reduces error.


How about the three patients who used drugs I prescribed them to commit suicide because they downed the whole bottle? Would better handwriting have 'reduced errors'?i76.photobucket.com/albums/j33/C-4C/poke.gif


First of all, I don't see how three patients who downed an entire bottle of medicine on purpose to commit suicide relieves you of your duty to reduce prescription errors.

Fact is, poor handwriting kills. We have computers now that have been proven to reduce errors. Studies have been done that prove this and recommend that handwritten prescriptions be eliminated.

There was a time when doctors killed their customers because they didn't wash their hands. Now the information age has been upon us for more than two decades and you are defending the practice of writing scripts with illegible handwriting when errors can be avoided and records kept efficiently by computer. Computer files can easily be backed up by tape and protected from fire and other disasters. Computer files can be accessed easily in emergencies from remote location.


The downside to electronic records etc, is that the last tiny true shred of privacy that still exists in this country is the notes your doctor writes about you in your paper medical record. When that is reduced to a standardized electronic format, those that PAY your medical bills and want to "insure quality care" LOL, ie the .gov and the insurance company, will mine that data and any that bit of privacy is gone forever.
Funny how no one ever seems to mention this.
The only ones demanding electronic records are those that write the checks. And dont think they give a darn about you.




Houstons_Problem didn't think things through.
Link Posted: 10/11/2007 6:43:03 PM EST

Originally Posted By Kodan:
Big Brother Strikes AGAIN!! What were 'they' thinking ???

www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,301040,00.html

This makes you want to slap somebody. Dont know which I hate worse...the person that came up with the idea or the Sheepletards that are carrying it out!!

Excellent article though




If you have a doctor start asking your kids such questions, inform them that it is a boundary violation and continuing to do so WILL result in a formal complaint. If you've HAD a doctor release information from such questions to ANYBODY in a manner that identifies you or your family members, file a HIPPA complaint/lawsuit.
Link Posted: 10/12/2007 9:19:32 AM EST

Originally Posted By LoneWolf545:

Originally Posted By Kodan:
Big Brother Strikes AGAIN!! What were 'they' thinking ???

www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,301040,00.html

This makes you want to slap somebody. Dont know which I hate worse...the person that came up with the idea or the Sheepletards that are carrying it out!!

Excellent article though




If you have a doctor start asking your kids such questions, inform them that it is a boundary violation and continuing to do so WILL result in a formal complaint. If you've HAD a doctor release information from such questions to ANYBODY in a manner that identifies you or your family members, file a HIPPA complaint/lawsuit.


+1

Straight forward to the point with all the info needed to own the poor misguided bastard.
Link Posted: 10/12/2007 9:28:52 AM EST
i would have givin that doctor a prescription of 12 gauge... take orally of course
Link Posted: 10/12/2007 9:35:40 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/12/2007 9:36:28 AM EST by Merrell]
Docs (real ones, with MD's) are OK in my book.

That being said, it would now seem incumbent on every parent to always be present when a Doc is examining their child (except in trauma procedures, of course). If the Doc wants to examine your child in private, tell him/her "NO" and that you are concerned that the Doc might be some sort of pedophile. Do so very loudly and get the whole waiting room in an uproar. Two can play at this game.

Link Posted: 10/12/2007 9:47:47 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/12/2007 10:00:31 AM EST by speedfreak955]
Doctors are experts on the subject just like musicians
Evidently both are so elitist that they feel they should have a say in our private lives...
But then theres that whole "Freedom" thing our forefathers wrote about... Pesky little sliver of parchment... They will wipe their ass with it soon enough
Megadeths propaganda video

ETA: If you want to see why the country is going in the shitter read some of the responses to the video
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