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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 10/3/2005 6:51:18 PM EDT
When doing rifle to pistol transition drills do you put the rifle on safe before letting it fall free on the sling, or do you just let it fall free and transition to the pistol immediately
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:54:11 PM EDT
Yes, I put the safety on.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:54:45 PM EDT
Why wouldn't you?
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:54:49 PM EDT
Nope.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:56:47 PM EDT
Why would you transition until or unless your rifle is dry? In the times I've transitioned from rifle to pistol (in carbine matches), the rifle was dry, and I did not bother to engage the safety. I think I dropped the mag a few times...
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:57:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/3/2005 7:07:37 PM EDT by RED_5]
always
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:57:32 PM EDT
I do not hang a rifle that is not empty, safed or malf'ed. If its still a hot weapon, I safe it.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 7:01:42 PM EDT
Normally when I do the transition it's because the primary has either run dry or malfunctioned and in that case I do not mess with the safety go straight for the secondary.

Link Posted: 10/3/2005 7:02:04 PM EDT
Why would you want to transition if your rifle is not empty or malfunctioning?

For transition training, just follow the Pat Rogers course (avail at the Maryland AR15 website), and start with a condition 4 carbine.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 7:05:04 PM EDT
some things to consider:
why are you transitioning? is it because your carbine has ammo and is functioning properly?
probably not.
If you have a malfunction you may not be able to.
that being said, doing so during training will ingrain a reflex to do so under stress, which probably
won't cost you any time during your transition.
And just an idea, but instead of letting your carbine "fall free",try pulling down against you with
your non-firing hand while obtaining a fighting grip on your pistol. (BEWARE: adjust your sling so
you do not slap yourself in the nuts with the barrel!).
just my two cents...
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 7:05:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Matthew_Q:
Why would you transition until or unless your rifle is dry? In the times I've transitioned from rifle to pistol (in carbine matches), the rifle was dry, and I did not bother to engage the safety. I think I dropped the mag a few times...

Training for malfunctions. I put the weapon on safe before dropping it. Is this a good idea or will it hurt me in matches or real life fights. I dont want to give up a second making the weapon safe when I should be squeezing off a round from my pistol.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 7:06:08 PM EDT
Hell no... transitions are done in extreme situations like running out of ammo or suffering a malfunction. Fumbling with the safety will significantly slow down the transition, possibly increasing your exposure. What you do in practice, you will do in a gunfight. This is one of the many reasons I have a regular stock trigger on my SHTF carbine rather than a fancy match trigger.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 7:07:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By just-mike:
some things to consider:
why are you transitioning? is it because your carbine has ammo and is functioning properly?
probably not.
If you have a malfunction you may not be able to.
that being said, doing so during training will ingrain a reflex to do so under stress, which probably
won't cost you any time during your transition.
And just an idea, but instead of letting your carbine "fall free",try pulling down against you with
your non-firing hand while obtaining a fighting grip on your pistol. (BEWARE: adjust your sling so
you do not slap yourself in the nuts with the barrel!).
just my two cents...

Sounds like good advice thanks.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 7:09:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By StealthyBlagga:
Hell no... transitions are done in extreme situations like running out of ammo or suffering a malfunction. Fumbling with the safety will significantly slow down the transition, possibly increasing your exposure. What you do in practice, you will do in a gunfight. This is one of the many reasons I have a regular stock trigger on my SHTF carbine rather than a fancy match trigger.



Fumbling with the safety?

I assume we are talking about an AR-15 here. If you are fumbling with an AR safety, you aint doin something right. For me it is a quick instinctive flick of the thumb... doesn't use up any time.

Like others said, if the weapon is empty or has failed, I probably wouldn't worry about the safety.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 7:31:41 PM EDT
Yes
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 7:42:40 PM EDT
Yes, but it costs me no extra time. I let the rifle go with left hand, and as it's rotating down onto the sling, my right thumb clicks on the safety.
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