Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
11/24/2017 4:44:23 PM
11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 3
Posted: 8/15/2004 6:51:33 PM EST
Is a PHD a req to legally be called a DR?
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 6:53:54 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/15/2004 6:55:02 PM EST by Glock31]
Anything degree that includes "doctor" will officially land you the Dr. prefix to your name.

JD, MD, Ph.D, DMD, etc.

Edited to add: why?
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 6:55:53 PM EST
Just every one seems to be a Dr.
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 6:59:38 PM EST
PhD's in a university setting are called Dr so and so but they are not allowed to be refer to themselves
as Dr outside the university setting. One of my Prof's told us that this last year. Only MD's are actually allowed to refer to themselves as Dr. Wierd huh?
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 7:04:02 PM EST
I think it's kind of weaselly for non-MDs to call themselves "doctor." I mean, if somebody says "I'm dying! I need a doctor" and a bystander says "Hey! That guy over there introduced himself as Dr. Williams! I'll get him!" and Williams is a PhD in Medieval Spanish Literature, the dying guy is going to be pretty disappointed.

I can see calling a professor "Dr." in an academic setting, but not otherwise. I suppose calling a psychologist "Dr." makes it easier to spill one's guts. IIRC in Germany everybody with a doctorate is called "doctor," but here it smells to me like pathetic self-aggrandizement. I don't do it, though I guess I'm as entitled to do so as a psychologist or professor.
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 7:06:20 PM EST
HAHAHA
My fav Dr. just came to mind of thinking of all the Dr.'s

DR.PHIL
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 7:09:19 PM EST
Only if they are professors at a university and only within the university settings.

Simply have a Ph.D. does not give you the right to be called doctor.
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 7:10:58 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/15/2004 7:18:41 PM EST by Spade]

Originally Posted By bluedogsixty:
PhD's in a university setting are called Dr so and so but they are not allowed to be refer to themselves
as Dr outside the university setting. One of my Prof's told us that this last year. Only MD's are actually allowed to refer to themselves as Dr. Wierd huh?



That Prof was wrong.

The PhD's and other terminal degrees are the only "real" academic doctors. It's a terminal degree that gets the title.

JD's aren't doctors. It's a professional degree, and your title I believe is "Counseler" (sp) or something along those lines. There's a PhD or some other terminal degree in justice, and that's the Doctor title.

MD's, Vets, Dentists, are only called "Doctor" because it's a professional title for a professional degree. You can earn a PhD in all those fields.

If you have a PhD, or a medical professional degree "Doctor" is your offical title. It replaces Mr, Mrs, Ms, etc. Calling them Mr. or Mrs. would be like calling a Captain "Mr.". Sure it's "okay", but you are ignoring the title that they earned.

My dad's got a PhD in Chem, and gets real pickey about this stuff.
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 7:16:15 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/15/2004 7:17:33 PM EST by Glock31]

Originally Posted By bluedogsixty:
PhD's in a university setting are called Dr so and so but they are not allowed to be refer to themselves
as Dr outside the university setting. One of my Prof's told us that this last year. Only MD's are actually allowed to refer to themselves as Dr. Wierd huh?



Is that decided state-by-state, or is there some kind of national regulation on who can be called "Doctor" and when? I've run into several people (mostly college professors and a few lawyers) who introduce themselves as Dr. xxxx just about everywhere.

Nevermind, posted after Spade's reply.
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 7:27:17 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/15/2004 7:34:48 PM EST by Miranthis]

Originally Posted By Spade:

Originally Posted By bluedogsixty:
PhD's in a university setting are called Dr so and so but they are not allowed to be refer to themselves
as Dr outside the university setting. One of my Prof's told us that this last year. Only MD's are actually allowed to refer to themselves as Dr. Wierd huh?



That Prof was wrong.

The PhD's and other terminal degrees are the only "real" academic doctors. It's a terminal degree that gets the title.

JD's aren't doctors. It's a professional degree, and your title I believe is "Counseler" (sp) or something along those lines. There's a PhD in justice, and that's the Doctor title.

{snip}
My dad's got a PhD in Chem, and gets real pickey about this stuff.



Actually, with my J.D. I wear the SAME academic regalia as your PhD dad. The only difference is that my degree color is purple (law) and my institusional colors are white blue and gold for my university. We have the same three sleeve stripes and two vertical chest stripes as any other doctoral graduate.

Sure there is a pecking order, but the term doctor is a large one that encompasses all the doctoral level graduates. In common usage the only doctors of Philosophy and the medical doctors (D.O., M.D., D.M.D etc. but not Pharm. D. interestingly) are referred to as "doctors" in their settings. THe original message above forgot to att the D.O. but they are 'real' doctors just as any M.D. is.

To get it straight as to law anyone who holds a J.D. has a Doctorate degree in law. This IS the terminal degree and the legal letters degrees (LL.B, and LL.D at least) have not been in use for almost a century in most parts of the country. BUT, you are not an Attorney and/or consellor at law until and unless you pass the bar in at least one state. You can go on to get a specialization post doctorate in a very few hyper technical areas of law and that is still called an LL.M, but it is not a terminal degree.

The PhD in Justice is not a "law" degree. It is a degree in the criminal justic arena.

Now there is some interesting history as to why american law schools stopped offering LL.B degrees and went to the J.D. I'll have to dig that out if I can find it.

Link Posted: 8/15/2004 7:36:59 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/15/2004 7:37:46 PM EST by FLAL1A]
All of this, particularly the "pecking order" business, is unmitigated, made-up bullshit fuelling and protected big egos trapped in tiny lives. There's a kid in a comic strip whose first name is "Doctor." I know people named "Major" and "General." There is no law governing this pansy-assed silliness, other than some state laws regulating false claims of academic training. A PhD is a doctor of philosophy in whatever field (if a chemist is picky about this stuff, maybe he can expound on the "philosophy" of chemistry); an EdD is a doctor of education; a JD is a doctor of jurisprudence (and the "terminal" degree [another bogus concept] in jurisprudence is an LLM - Master of Law in a narrowly defined area, almost always Taxation , which allows the holder to do just exactly nothing that a JD can't do); and a Chiropractor is a DC.

The whole concept reminds me of a bunch of twits at a Robert Burns dinner arguing over who is "entitled" to wear which tartan.
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 7:37:44 PM EST

Originally Posted By Miranthis:

Originally Posted By Spade:

Originally Posted By bluedogsixty:
PhD's in a university setting are called Dr so and so but they are not allowed to be refer to themselves
as Dr outside the university setting. One of my Prof's told us that this last year. Only MD's are actually allowed to refer to themselves as Dr. Wierd huh?



That Prof was wrong.

The PhD's and other terminal degrees are the only "real" academic doctors. It's a terminal degree that gets the title.

JD's aren't doctors. It's a professional degree, and your title I believe is "Counseler" (sp) or something along those lines. There's a PhD in justice, and that's the Doctor title.

{snip}
My dad's got a PhD in Chem, and gets real pickey about this stuff.



Actually, with my J.D. I wear the SAME academic regalia as your PhD dad. The only difference is that my degree color is purple (law) and my institusional colors are white blue and gold for my university. We have the same three sleeve stripes and two vertical chest stripes as any other doctoral graduate.



I have to agree with Spade on this one. I don't THINK a J.D. is a "doctoral degree" with the same meaning as a Ph.D. or an M.D. (I understand the regelia and what they call the degree, but I don't think it's considered the same "type" of degree)

I honestly thought that only Ph.D. and M.D. were the degrees that allowed the use of the "Dr." prefix, but I don't really KNOW (and it's not like there's some "title police" out there).


... I'm not trying to come across as an asshole or anything (and feel free to smack me upside the head next time we run into another at a shoot) but it rubs me the wrong way when people like chiropractors or others call themselves "Dr" when they've not really got a real doctoral degree.
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 7:39:44 PM EST
Correct me if I'm wrong, but you can call yourself anything, as long as you're not trying to defraud anyone.
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 7:40:51 PM EST

Originally Posted By 95thFoot:
Correct me if I'm wrong, but you can call yourself anything, as long as you're not trying to defraud anyone.



I think THAT's the correct answer!

Bow down to Dr. Generalissimo DK-Prof, attorney-at-law
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 8:14:23 PM EST
Academic PhdDs can use the title "doctor" if they like, but it's considered a bit dodgy in the US when off campus. Other people with academic PhDs will probably think you're an ass and it makes you look a little desprate, at least unless you're a major wheel in your field. In the slightly more formal world of business cards it's more typical to see something like "Joe Blow, Ph.D" rather than "Dr. Joe Blow". But you do see some with the title--"Dr. Kissinger" and so on.

Different countries have different customs. I think it's more common to see the degree used as a title in the UK and Germany.
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 8:55:04 PM EST
I once heard Condi Rice referred to as "Dr. Rice" even though it was outside the context of her Stanford position. I don't think that was appropriate.

When I finish my doctorate I will not be referring to myself "Dr." on a casual basis. I don't even refer to any of my superiors as "Dr. XXXX" unless I'm being intriduced for the first time. Of course I will be putting "Ph.D" by the end of my name on business cards. I think I will have earned that right at minimum.
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 8:59:53 PM EST

Originally Posted By ShadowOne:
I once heard Condi Rice referred to as "Dr. Rice" even though it was outside the context of her Stanford position. I don't think that was appropriate.

When I finish my doctorate I will not be referring to myself "Dr." on a casual basis. I don't even refer to any of my superiors as "Dr. XXXX" unless I'm being intriduced for the first time. Of course I will be putting "Ph.D" by the end of my name on business cards. I think I will have earned that right at minimum.



I've found that in academia (at least in the research institutions that I work at) people use the "Dr. joe Blow" and the "Joe Blow, Ph.D." pretty interchangably.

I would find it odd to have Condi Rice NOT be referred to as "Dr. Rice"



(Just to be clear, I don't refer to myself as "Dr" on a casual basis - but only when I'm being an asshole)

Link Posted: 8/15/2004 9:05:01 PM EST
The "PhD" after the name on the business card is entirely appropriate, I think. It establishes your credibility quickly in an environment where you're often only chatting for a few minutes. Especially if you're not working in an academic job. People often put other "skill badges" on their b-cards.
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 9:06:53 PM EST

Originally Posted By ShadowOne:
I once heard Condi Rice referred to as "Dr. Rice" even though it was outside the context of her Stanford position. I don't think that was appropriate.

When I finish my doctorate I will not be referring to myself "Dr." on a casual basis. I don't even refer to any of my superiors as "Dr. XXXX" unless I'm being intriduced for the first time. Of course I will be putting "Ph.D" by the end of my name on business cards. I think I will have earned that right at minimum.



I'm not a gynocologist... but I'll take a look anyway.
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 9:07:15 PM EST

Originally Posted By mcgredo:
Academic PhdDs can use the title "doctor" if they like, but it's considered a bit dodgy in the US when off campus. Other people with academic PhDs will probably think you're an ass and it makes you look a little desprate, at least unless you're a major wheel in your field.




I've never seen that, and most of my dad's time with his PhD was spent in industry or government research. All of his patents, publications, signs on doors and ACS documents were always with "Dr." And everybody I was ever introduced to with a PhD at Argonne was always "Dr."

The title followes the degree, and nothing else.

And I'm also with DK-Prof. Regallia aside, an MD, Dentist, and JD aren't considered up there with PhD's and other terminals because all of those fields have terminal degrees. You can get a PhD in law, and it's a higher degree than a JD. I'm gunning for Tulane Law right now, and when I get my JD from wherever, if I for whatever reason went with my dad to an ACS meeting and called myself Dr. G, and then they found out I had a JD and not a PhD in Law, I'd instantly get looked down upon. A medical doc of any time would not be, because they're medical (for the same reason it seems almost every corpsman picks up the nickname "Doc". They aren't "doctors", but in a sense they are).

And Condi Rice should be properly called Dr. Rice, since IIRC she's got a terminal degree. Except I think her offical gov't title trumps (since when I met a military officer with a PhD they were called by their rank and not their degree title).

The only time a title changes academic wise would be the title "professor". You can't use that unless you're teaching.
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 9:08:49 PM EST



Link Posted: 8/15/2004 9:11:08 PM EST
So where do you get a PhD in Jurisprudence?
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 9:20:56 PM EST

Originally Posted By bluedogsixty:
PhD's in a university setting are called Dr so and so but they are not allowed to be refer to themselves
as Dr outside the university setting. One of my Prof's told us that this last year. Only MD's are actually allowed to refer to themselves as Dr. Wierd huh?



A Ph.D can absolutely call themself Dr. outside of academia, as long as they aren't suggesting themselves to be something they aren't.
It just doesn't occur often because a sociologist, for example, would rather be introduced as a sociologist than as a doctor.

The NYTimes and other major circulations (not a left or right thing) changed their policy on this a couple years back; now if you have a Ph.D you will bereferred to as Dr. Doe rather than Mr. Doe. Most presidents around the world don't have Ph.Ds so they are still stuck with Mr. in print except for the first mention of their name in the article which includes president/prime minister. I like it, an ego check for the big guys and a boost for those who busted their ass working on their doctorate.
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 9:32:10 PM EST

Originally Posted By FLAL1A:
So where do you get a PhD in Jurisprudence?



Tulane for one. I know 'cause I looked at their website today.
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 9:40:07 PM EST

Originally Posted By Spade:

Originally Posted By FLAL1A:
So where do you get a PhD in Jurisprudence?



Tulane for one. I know 'cause I looked at their website today.




The PhD program in law requires completion of an LLM at Tulane Law School with a distinguished record.


Don't get too wrapped up in the prestige of that degree.
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 10:07:46 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/15/2004 10:09:29 PM EST by Spade]

Originally Posted By FLAL1A:

Originally Posted By Spade:

Originally Posted By FLAL1A:
So where do you get a PhD in Jurisprudence?



Tulane for one. I know 'cause I looked at their website today.



The PhD program in law requires completion of an LLM at Tulane Law School with a distinguished record.



Don't get too wrapped up in the prestige of that degree.

I'm not sure what you mean by "prestige" of that degree. It's a terminal research degree with a dissertation. It's not like a law school can issue a terminal degree at a whim or something.

You're aware that a lot of schools in many fields want their Masters candidates to stay for their terminal degree right?

Duke, I believe it was, told me, when I said I was interested in just their MA in History and wanted to return to PSU for my PhD, that if I wasn't sticking around for my PhD they didn't want me, and they really only wanted their own Masters folks for their PhD program.

It seems like you only followed to Tulane. Virginia, Harvard, etc. offer a Doctor of Juridicial Science, which is, IIRC, also the equivilent of a PhD. In other words a research based terminal degree.

So yeah, fair number of places to go to get a terminal degree in law. Not as many as offer just JD's or LLMs (masters degree), but they are there. I think the vast majority of people quit at their JD or LLM, though.
Link Posted: 8/15/2004 10:18:00 PM EST

Originally Posted By CavVet:
www.eminemitalia.it/minisiti/dre/dre1.jpg







OMFG I nearly pissed myself when I saw this picture posted in this thread. I'm laughing so hard my eyes are tearing up. LOL

Thank you CavVet for giving me the best laugh of my week.
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 6:54:18 AM EST
doesn't phd stand for "piled higher and deeper?" mcole, j.d.
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 7:00:00 AM EST

Originally Posted By mcole:
doesn't phd stand for "piled higher and deeper?" mcole, j.d.




It's funny how there seems to be a perfect correlation between people who say that and people who don't have a phd
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 7:07:14 AM EST

Originally Posted By Spade:

Originally Posted By bluedogsixty:
PhD's in a university setting are called Dr so and so but they are not allowed to be refer to themselves
as Dr outside the university setting. One of my Prof's told us that this last year. Only MD's are actually allowed to refer to themselves as Dr. Wierd huh?




JD's aren't doctors. It's a professional degree, and your title I believe is "Counseler" (sp) or something along those lines. There's a PhD or some other terminal degree in justice, and that's the Doctor title.




The terminal degree in law is an SJD.
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 7:24:04 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 7:25:49 AM EST
I'm an MBA aspiring to get the ole doctorate someday. Now here is a ? Which is the better choice - a Ph.D. in Biz or a DBA? Either way you get the title, so whats the difference?
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 9:40:53 AM EST

Originally Posted By EdAvilaSr:

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
(Just to be clear, I don't refer to myself as "Dr" on a casual basis - but only when I'm being an asshole)





How often is that?



As I get older, more and more often!

Get off my lawn!!!
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 9:44:11 AM EST

Originally Posted By ARKAN_the_Tiger:
I'm an MBA aspiring to get the ole doctorate someday. Now here is a ? Which is the better choice - a Ph.D. in Biz or a DBA? Either way you get the title, so whats the difference?



I don't think it really matters, but there may be some advatage to one or the other depending on what you intend to use it for.


If you intend to be in academia, conducting research, then I see both. In my field (Organizational Behavior). I see people with Ph.D.s, I'm starting to see more people with DBAs, and sometimes people with Ph.D.s in related fields, like Psychology.



Notice that since I'm in the field of Organizational Behavior (called O.B. for short), I am technically a Doctor who specializes in O.B. Form a line, ladies !!!!
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 9:46:46 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 10:34:48 AM EST

Originally Posted By Spade:

Originally Posted By bluedogsixty:
PhD's in a university setting are called Dr so and so but they are not allowed to be refer to themselves
as Dr outside the university setting. One of my Prof's told us that this last year. Only MD's are actually allowed to refer to themselves as Dr. Wierd huh?



That Prof was wrong.

The PhD's and other terminal degrees are the only "real" academic doctors. It's a terminal degree that gets the title.

JD's aren't doctors. It's a professional degree, and your title I believe is "Counseler" (sp) or something along those lines. There's a PhD or some other terminal degree in justice, and that's the Doctor title.

MD's, Vets, Dentists, are only called "Doctor" because it's a professional title for a professional degree. You can earn a PhD in all those fields.

If you have a PhD, or a medical professional degree "Doctor" is your offical title. It replaces Mr, Mrs, Ms, etc. Calling them Mr. or Mrs. would be like calling a Captain "Mr.". Sure it's "okay", but you are ignoring the title that they earned.

My dad's got a PhD in Chem, and gets real pickey about this stuff.




Oh so your dad is one of those is he?
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 10:38:11 AM EST
What REALLY chaps my hide is those clowns with Ed. D's (education) that INSIST on being called "Doctor".

The principal at my Jr. High got his Ed D one year, and when he returned, if you addressed him as "Mr. Clark," this clown would actually correct you and say "No, it's DR. Clark now!" with that goofy smile on his face.

An Ed. D is a farce (comparatively speaking)
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 10:39:34 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/16/2004 10:40:32 AM EST by lvgunner777]
I talk to a lot of "potential clients" (they never pan out) that leave my secretary a message that says, "please call DR. So and SO". Ok fine, I call them back and I say so what do you have your doctorate in. Oh, theology. Ok, I say, what university??? Uh, I got my doctorate on line......... . Right about then I am looking for ways to get off the phone because I know the guy is full of shit from that point forward.
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 10:42:10 AM EST

Originally Posted By Spade:
I've never seen that, and most of my dad's time with his PhD was spent in industry or government research. All of his patents, publications, signs on doors and ACS documents were always with "Dr." And everybody I was ever introduced to with a PhD at Argonne was always "Dr."

All the publications I've ev er read say Joe Blow, PhD , rather than "Dr. Joe Blow"


And I'm also with DK-Prof. Regallia aside, an MD, Dentist, and JD aren't considered up there with PhD's and other terminals because all of those fields have terminal degrees. You can get a PhD in law, and it's a higher degree than a JD. I'm gunning for Tulane Law right now, and when I get my JD from wherever, if I for whatever reason went with my dad to an ACS meeting and called myself Dr. G, and then they found out I had a JD and not a PhD in Law, I'd instantly get looked down upon. A medical doc of any time would not be, because they're medical (for the same reason it seems almost every corpsman picks up the nickname "Doc". They aren't "doctors", but in a sense they are).



WTF ? I'll buy your argument that a lawyer calling hisself "Dr." would be laugned at, but to say "An MD isn't considered up there" is kind of loopy
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 1:37:13 PM EST
What about my favorite Dr.? Dr. John.
Am I going to get in trouble when all those hot lil' chicks keep reffering to me as "Dr. Love"?
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 1:57:24 PM EST
My mother has a JD from Tulane, but she doesn't refer to herself as Doctor. However, my 9th grade english teacher and biology teacher have an E.D. and a Ph.D. in Biology, respectively, and they both called themselves Doctor. Now, when I took a college course in Computer Graphics, the (Ph.D. in Art) professor asked to be referred to as either Doctor or Professor. And every MD I've ever talked to is by default called Doctor.

The first three were pompous asses, IMHO (but my mother for different reasons). The latter two were entitled to being called both Doctor and NOT a pompous ass.

While I intend on pursuing a doctorate of one type or another, I don't want to be referred to as Doctor unless I'm an MD or a professor. (Psychology is not an MD. Psychiatry is).
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 2:04:25 PM EST

Originally Posted By jblachly:


WTF ? I'll buy your argument that a lawyer calling hisself "Dr." would be laugned at, but to say "An MD isn't considered up there" is kind of loopy



I didn't mean "up there" as a derugatory statement. I meant that it isn't the terminal degree for the field.



jblachly: Oh so your dad is one of those is he?


Really only with people like that guy with the Ed.D you described.
Which seems to be more and more people these days.

The worst one I ever saw was a guy with an honorary degree who demanded to be called "Dr."
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 2:05:26 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/16/2004 2:34:09 PM EST by The_Alchemist]
You could donate a whole bunch of money to a school and they may give you an honorary Doctorate. "Doctor of Letters"
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 2:06:49 PM EST

Originally Posted By MagKnightX:
My mother has a JD from Tulane, but she doesn't refer to herself as Doctor.




Could you ask your mother how she liked the place, and all that?

I know it probably wouldn't be current data, but my family doesn't know a soul who went there. I don't like walking blind into a place. We've got one lawyer, and know maybe five others, almost all of whom went to PA schools.

I'd appreciate it. Drop me an IM.
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 2:29:11 PM EST

Originally Posted By Spade:

Originally Posted By jblachly:


WTF ? I'll buy your argument that a lawyer calling hisself "Dr." would be laugned at, but to say "An MD isn't considered up there" is kind of loopy



I didn't mean "up there" as a derugatory statement. I meant that it isn't the terminal degree for the field.





The MD is the terminal degree in the medical field.
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 4:35:19 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 4:37:26 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 4:56:11 PM EST
I recently took a handgun course and the instructor asked if there were any nurses or doctors among us. No one else came forward so I volunteered. He just wanted me to familiarize myself with their first aid kit if someone developed a sucking chest wound. I don't think he would have been satisfied with a PhD.
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 4:59:42 PM EST

Originally Posted By jblachly:
The MD is the terminal degree in the medical field.



I work at a teaching hospital. You would not believe how much superior MD's with PhD's act over the ones that only have MD's.
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 5:14:00 PM EST
When I was in grad school, every professor with a Doctorate was called Doctor in every setting.
If I talk about a colleague across town that I see frequently, I call them Doctor.
When I talk about book authors in my field, people in my class that I didn't know well, etc., I call them all Doctor.

I think that this may be a professional courtesy in my field. I'm not sure how much it extends to others.
-Hobbit
Link Posted: 8/16/2004 5:29:12 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/16/2004 5:33:34 PM EST by jblachly]

Originally Posted By Atencio:

Originally Posted By jblachly:
The MD is the terminal degree in the medical field.



I work at a teaching hospital. You would not believe how much superior MD's with PhD's act over the ones that only have MD's.




I'm a student at a teaching hospital so i would DEFINITELY believe it

The thing is -- PhDs are not a "continuation" of an MD. The PhDs are (usually) in basic science or other research fields. MD/PhDs also in most cases obtain the two degrees concomittantly, with the PhD getting done then the last 2 years of medical school finished.

I stand by my statement that the MD is the terminal degree in its field (medicine, whereby i mean the caring for patients). I would NOT trust a physiology PhD to take care of me in all but the most dire emergency.
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 3
Top Top