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Posted: 11/21/2008 4:18:12 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/21/2008 4:18:39 AM EDT by SnoopisTDI]
As it says to the left, I live in TX.  Unfortunately, I am being relocated to MD for the next two years.

My plan is to keep my primary residence in TX, keep my TX drivers license, license plates, CHL, etc., and just rent an apartment for the two years in MD.  Have any of you done something like this before?  Are there any gotchas, any legal or tax issues I need to worry about?  I know I will be paying state/county income taxes in MD.
Link Posted: 11/21/2008 4:19:52 AM EDT
Link Posted: 11/21/2008 4:21:22 AM EDT
Let's be blunt, shall we?

You rate what you fucking skate. There are definite advantages to having a TX DL over a MD DL. Same with FL vs. NY.

That's all I'm going to say.
Link Posted: 11/21/2008 4:32:54 AM EDT
A lot of that is going to depend on what the state laws say. In NYS, for instance, you have a set period of time to transfer your registration, license, etc to NYS. Your primary residence will be MD, not TX. The only exceptions would be military folks or college students. Check MDs laws to see what they say.
Link Posted: 11/21/2008 4:44:51 AM EDT
i've been in LA since aug. 07, still have SC tags and License, they can kiss my ass on changing it
Link Posted: 11/21/2008 4:55:19 AM EDT
Originally Posted By tc556guy:
A lot of that is going to depend on what the state laws say. In NYS, for instance, you have a set period of time to transfer your registration, license, etc to NYS. Your primary residence will be MD, not TX. The only exceptions would be military folks or college students. Check MDs laws to see what they say.


Is that even if you still have a house in the first state?
Link Posted: 11/21/2008 5:48:49 AM EDT
Residency is a matter of INTENT.  

"Two elements are necessary to create a residence: (1) a physical presence in that place and (2) the intention of remaining there as a permanent home."
Link Posted: 11/21/2008 5:51:41 AM EDT
Link Posted: 11/21/2008 5:53:37 AM EDT
As long as you register to vote in both states, I don't have a problem with it.
Link Posted: 11/21/2008 5:53:59 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/21/2008 5:55:21 AM EDT by AKSig]
My parents do and they've been going back and forth between their homes in CA and their house in CO for 6-7 years now. They still have the cars registered in CA and have CA DL's.

ETA: At one point they lived in CO year round for the 4 years my bro was in high school there.
Link Posted: 11/21/2008 5:54:24 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Kikilee:
Residency is a matter of INTENT.  

"Two elements are necessary to create a residence: (1) a physical presence in that place and (2) the intention of remaining there as a permanent home."



This.

It can become a tax nightmare if collection activity starts from the state you do not consider your residence. The law firm I work for has been involved in trying to settle quite a few of these matters.

Work closely with a good CPA.
Link Posted: 11/21/2008 6:03:29 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/21/2008 6:05:45 AM EDT by TheRealSundance]
Originally Posted By SnoopisTDI:
As it says to the left, I live in TX.  Unfortunately, I am being relocated to MD for the next two years.

My plan is to keep my primary residence in TX, keep my TX drivers license, license plates, CHL, etc., and just rent an apartment for the two years in MD.  Have any of you done something like this before?  Are there any gotchas, any legal or tax issues I need to worry about?  I know I will be paying state/county income taxes in MD.



When MD catches you and tows and impounds your car, you'll have wished you registered it when you could have.


When you do, tell them you have been here for less then 30 days so you don't have to pay as much.

Oh yeah, they just changed the residency requirements too.  They want their tax money and will find you.  I think they lowered it to 3 month or so.
Link Posted: 11/21/2008 6:07:55 AM EDT
Heres a real simple idea...how does anyone know how long you have been in a state, if anyone asked just tell them you are here on a business trip for a couple of weeks.
Link Posted: 11/21/2008 8:41:49 AM EDT
Originally Posted By p712k:
Heres a real simple idea...how does anyone know how long you have been in a state, if anyone asked just tell them you are here on a business trip for a couple of weeks.


That may work for a while, but after I have an apartment in MD for a year, it makes it hard to say I'm just in town for a little while.  And my employer will be witholding Maryland taxes.  Plus my mail forwarding or change of address, which I haven't even figured out yet.

Link Posted: 11/21/2008 10:37:16 AM EDT
Well it looks like I will NOT be able to avoid being a Maryland resident.

According to their Non-resident tax booklet found here, "you are a resident if your permanent home is in Maryland (the law refers to this as your domicile) or if your home is outside of Maryland but you maintained a place of abode (that is a place to live) in Maryland for more than six months of the tax year and you are physically present in Maryland for 183 days or more (you are a statutory resident)."

Link Posted: 11/21/2008 10:46:33 AM EDT
In CO you have 30 days to register your vehicle and get a drivers license after establishing residency. Obviously that would be hard to prove, but i read that when i moved out here.

Link Posted: 11/21/2008 11:03:34 AM EDT
How far is the office from Virgina?
Link Posted: 11/21/2008 1:15:06 PM EDT
Originally Posted By n0zzle:
How far is the office from Virgina?


Unfortunately it's about 45 miles to the bridge, and probably another 10-20 miles to anywhere I could stay.  Even getting good mileage in my car, that's a lot of money to spend on fuel(and who knows what that will cost in a year), especially since the relocation package already comes about $700/month short.

The more I look at this, the worse it looks.  I might be better off finding a new job locally even if it does pay less.
Link Posted: 11/21/2008 1:26:24 PM EDT
Originally Posted By SnoopisTDI:
Well it looks like I will NOT be able to avoid being a Maryland resident.

According to their Non-resident tax booklet found here, "you are a resident if your permanent home is in Maryland (the law refers to this as your domicile) or if your home is outside of Maryland but you maintained a place of abode (that is a place to live) in Maryland for more than six months of the tax year and you are physically present in Maryland for 183 days or more (you are a statutory resident)."



Do they put a chip in you to verify that?
Link Posted: 11/21/2008 1:38:46 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/21/2008 1:39:12 PM EDT by p712k]
Here is how you do it, get an apartment in MD, have all mail including your tax forms sent to CO. Have your ID and car registration stay in CO. Switch all necessary bills to a PO box in MD (statement address), keep the main address your address in CO (I am assuming you are keeping it)  and add the MD address as an alternative address in case you need something shipped there. As long as you don’t do anything heinous, at which point residency will be the least of your worries, you will be fine even if you get a ticket you can pay it by mail using a money order.

A police officer cannot check things like check where you have your credit card bills sent and what address is used on your payroll forms at a traffic stop.

Just pay your taxes to MD at the end of the year and you will be fine. THEY WILL CARE ABOUT GETTING THEIR MONEY!
Link Posted: 11/21/2008 2:30:22 PM EDT
Originally Posted By p712k:
Here is how you do it, get an apartment in MD, have all mail including your tax forms sent to CO. Have your ID and car registration stay in CO. Switch all necessary bills to a PO box in MD (statement address), keep the main address your address in CO (I am assuming you are keeping it)  and add the MD address as an alternative address in case you need something shipped there. As long as you don’t do anything heinous, at which point residency will be the least of your worries, you will be fine even if you get a ticket you can pay it by mail using a money order.

A police officer cannot check things like check where you have your credit card bills sent and what address is used on your payroll forms at a traffic stop.

Just pay your taxes to MD at the end of the year and you will be fine. THEY WILL CARE ABOUT GETTING THEIR MONEY!


Just last month I got a bill from the state of Maryland claiming I owed them $4100 for letting my car insurance lapse.  Well my insurance never lapsed, I just left the state... over three years ago.  My point?  If they consider me a resident - and it now appears they do - they will eventually figure it out, and they will want more money.  A lot of it.

Link Posted: 11/21/2008 2:43:10 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/21/2008 2:46:57 PM EDT by ultramagbrion]
I could claim residence in Iowa after this year I was a legal resident of Ohio for 7 months at one time.....Michigan for a year before I actually moved there. Ive legally lived in 5 different states.

Because of my work,I spend but 3-4 months a year at home in NH........thus my sig line.


Florida states that once you haved lived in the state for 30 days you must get a FL DL (at least that was the case 20 years ago) Michigan.....not so strict. Oklahoma didnt care.

It always varies state to state.........ask someone local what you can get away with.
Link Posted: 11/21/2008 2:58:24 PM EDT
Originally Posted By p712k:
Here is how you do it, get an apartment in MD, have all mail including your tax forms sent to CO. Have your ID and car registration stay in CO. Switch all necessary bills to a PO box in MD (statement address), keep the main address your address in CO (I am assuming you are keeping it)  and add the MD address as an alternative address in case you need something shipped there. As long as you don’t do anything heinous, at which point residency will be the least of your worries, you will be fine even if you get a ticket you can pay it by mail using a money order.

A police officer cannot check things like check where you have your credit card bills sent and what address is used on your payroll forms at a traffic stop.

Just pay your taxes to MD at the end of the year and you will be fine. THEY WILL CARE ABOUT GETTING THEIR MONEY!


This.....I've been living and working this way for 35 years
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