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Posted: 9/2/2004 9:41:30 AM EST
Just curious, if we have any other MA geeks here,

Feel free to reply about anything MA related,

bad experiences good experiences,

etc...
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 9:43:59 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/2/2004 9:44:07 AM EST by bull_8]
I just started taking Okinawan Go Ju at school. Not a bad class at all, seriously thinking bout taking it up full time besides school
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 9:44:57 AM EST
Krav maga.

Loads of self confindence and being more likily to talk my way out of a situation before people start getting hurt.

John
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 9:45:08 AM EST
Kendo - but St. Louis is not the best place for it, so it has been many years since I've been able to practice it regularly. (however, it is looking up for St. Louis lately, so I'm doing it at least once a week these days).



I really enjoy kendo for two reasons. One is that it demands mental and physical discipline, and I relaly like the underlying philosophy - and the other is that you usually meet very cool and interesting people. Because kendo has pretyt much NO PRACTICAL VALUE you don't get the dumbasses and the bullies that just want to learn how to beat someone up. (not saying there's a lot of them in martial arts like TaeKwonDo, but you ocasionally get them).


Link Posted: 9/2/2004 9:45:58 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/2/2004 9:47:17 AM EST by TomJefferson]
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 9:46:37 AM EST
I took dragonclaw kung fu for awhile, it was just too far to drive for me or I would have stuck with it.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 9:49:08 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/2/2004 9:57:42 AM EST by mist]
I study an old ninja art form called the "touch of death".


With just two fingers I can wreak havoc on an attacker, it is so deadly only a very few are allowed to learn it. Very few have even heard of it.

www.taijiworld.com/Articles/DM.html
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 9:49:43 AM EST
I have a blackbelt in HaiKu.

Link Posted: 9/2/2004 9:50:02 AM EST
I had fun with Kendo. One of these days I have 10 grand lying around I want to have a quality sword forged for me in Japan.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 9:50:10 AM EST

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
Kendo - but St. Louis is not the best place for it, so it has been many years since I've been able to practice it regularly. (however, it is looking up for St. Louis lately, so I'm doing it at least once a week these days).



I really enjoy kendo for two reasons. One is that it demands mental and physical discipline, and I relaly like the underlying philosophy - and the other is that you usually meet very cool and interesting people. Because kendo has pretyt much NO PRACTICAL VALUE you don't get the dumbasses and the bullies that just want to learn how to beat someone up. (not saying there's a lot of them in martial arts like TaeKwonDo, but you ocasionally get them).





I have a very good friend that has been doing kendo since he was 14 (he is 24 now)

he just got his Dan ranking and we were very excited about him completing it.

His Sensei (can't remember the Kendo term) gave him a beginner's class to start teaching and he is very good at it (I sat in on a couple of his courses)

I have noticed that he has the patience of a rock, I can't even get under his skin at all.

I think that alot of that comes from Kendo.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 9:51:06 AM EST
General MMA (mau tai, boxing, grappling) is the best I've found thus far for general street hand to hand. The Army HTH manual is pretty much a primer for Brazilian Jui-Jitsu (there is a link for this, with pics, floating around somewhere).

Experience? Fancy moves are bullshit. Training and strength get the job done. If someone tells you that their dicipline is too deadly for MMA matches, they are utterly full of shit.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 9:55:14 AM EST
I began studying Okinawan GoJu Ryu in '71 (age 6), Switched to Shuri Ryu in '85, trained in Shinto Yoshin Ryu Jujistu when I got to FL in '95. Haven't trained in a discipline for about 5 years now.

I think I probably got a lot more from it over the years than someone who starts later in life.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 10:03:20 AM EST
I started out doing "American" Karate. I made it up to a blue belt and stopped doing it. A few years later I started TKD and made it to a red belt and then quit again and switched to American S&W.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 10:05:09 AM EST
Shaolin Kung Fu. Very much enjoyed it, but unfortunately had to quit due to time constraints.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 10:06:03 AM EST
i fought full contact karate back in the eighties. self-confidence under pressure... i'm still in excellent shape at fifty as a result.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 10:10:31 AM EST
studied a bit of aikido, which was a profoundly life-changing event. principle-based system rather than technique-based. cannot be used aggressively, however.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 10:23:18 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/2/2004 10:26:20 AM EST by pale_pony]
TKD back in college, black belt.

42 years old, 6'01" 185 lbs and can still kick a grown attacker in the face as easily as I can throw a punch. Most importantly, it taught me how to remain calm and not to freak-out when confronted with a possible physical altercation.

Edited to add: Put simple, it taught me that it's not the dog in the fight (bigger, heavier, better form)
it's the fight in the dog! (experience, sheer willpower)
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 10:24:04 AM EST
mcdojo.com

[hilarity ensues]
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 10:31:18 AM EST
I took tae kwon do for about five months, then got my lunch money stolen by a wrestler. Seriously, tried to get a kick in during sparring at work, and he dropped me on my head.

Now I am currently learning Jiu Jitsu at work, every monday, wednesday and friday and an extra hour-and-a-half thursday mornings during sergeant's time I practice guards, mounts, take-downs... really good stuff. It's useful if you need to dislocate someone's arm or hip.

I ain't any sort of Gracie or any shit like that, but it's useful when you need to flex-cuff someone who doesn't want to be.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 10:56:47 AM EST
I studied Hwa Rang Do for several years during and after the service. It filled me with confidence and relaxation, all at the same time. Lately I've been working with an Aikido instructor, mainly for exercise purposes.

My beat-up aging body finds it increasingly difficult to cash my minds checks.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 11:07:47 AM EST
I hold a black belt in Aikido. The reason I like Aikido is that the harder the attacker tries to attack the more he gets hurt. I got into years ago when I first became a LEO. I can take the stand and say with complete truth that the defendant had to make the first move as Aikido is a purely defensive form. There are no attacks, you can't run up and Aikido someone. Made a few DA's look like morons.

DocD
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 11:25:31 AM EST
I have served as a grappling-lab rat for my cousin the last 5 years. He's on the American Top Team.
Gracie Jiu-jitsu more specifically. We grapple for 30 minutes non-stop or until I tap out from some rediculous submission hold. We do this every day at work during our half hour lunch. I'm about 0 and 100 against him lately. Although we don't strike, we both wear a "Gi" and adhere to strict Brazilian Jiu-jitsu as he has been trained. I weigh 265 and he weighs 170. His guard position is excellent although I always try to shoot on him first.

The kid is getting scary. At this point he uses me to increase his experience against a much larger opponent. I can hold my own, but sometimes it's hard to hold back from striking him.

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is dangerous against a trained adversary. I wish I could train in his school, but it just isn't feasible.

HS1
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 11:27:46 AM EST

Originally Posted By DocDavis:
I hold a black belt in Aikido. The reason I like Aikido is that the harder the attacker tries to attack the more he gets hurt. I got into years ago when I first became a LEO. I can take the stand and say with complete truth that the defendant had to make the first move as Aikido is a purely defensive form. There are no attacks, you can't run up and Aikido someone. Made a few DA's look like morons.




The contrast to Kendo is hilarious, because there really are no defensive moves in kendo whatsoever - every "defensive" move is simply a transition into an attack


If I ever take up another martial art, it will definitely be aikido - the dojo I practiced at in Chicago was the headquarters site of the American Aikido Association, IIRC - and I learned a lot about aikido. It really seems to be an excellent martial art.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 11:31:20 AM EST
Gracie/Brazillian JuJitsu. However, my sensi is currently stationed at teh pentagon, so my wife and I have been w/o a sensi or training group for several years.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 11:41:15 AM EST
Took traditional Karate and Judo for a little bit as a kid.

Trained with an Aikido stylist who learned from and fought in tournaments with his best friend's father (they were from Japan and moved stateside in the 70s).

Also took Aikijujitsu in a dojo.

Also learned defensive tactics in the academy.

That is all.

Link Posted: 9/2/2004 11:56:22 AM EST
I went to a private club, South Korean Karate, in Somers Point, NJ for a few years as a teenager. It was very valuable and I want my children to try it out as well. I've only needed the skills twice, thank God. The club had some former marines that were great mentors and real heroes.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 12:12:49 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/2/2004 12:13:51 PM EST by Blackjack272]
Started in 1995 at a Shao Lin Shu'an Fa school, and have been doing it ever since.

What have I gotten out of it? I've become much more disciplined from it, and have met some great people over the years, and have become quite fond of them. It is a fun place to practice, and you get tremendous levels of self-confidence when you walk down a stree alone. Also, after assisting some students in their own training, you gain the benefit of good observation skills - you can catch small things and actions when many others can't.

It also teaches you very practical self defense techniques. Somebody who has trained in Tae-Kwon-Do can be very deadly if they are good enough. But if I trap so much as ONE of their kicks, they are MINE, in my element ( the translation is 'The way of the Fist' ). Run into somebody hostile, and there are techniques to take them down INSTANTLY, harnessing natural instincts such as ducking or sidestepping.

Martial arts are a great way to improve your mental mindset, and a great way to increase your physical abilities. Additionally, the fact that you can defend yourself from any hostiles, and learn when to back off and when to be aggressive, is an added bonus.

( I;m an official Dojo Rat now... )
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 12:15:09 PM EST
I have been taking Wing Chun (or Wing Tsun depending on who you ask) for a couple of months now two days a week.

I really like it. The system was developed for females so it isn't about strength
it's all about re-application of force much like aikido.

I am really impressed by my instructor, he is from Buenos Aires and worked as a bouncer in some rough clubs. So everything he teaches us is from his experience in fights,
as he always says, (just imagine the heavy south american accent)

"If something from another systems works and the one from wing chun doesn't, I'm gonna teach you the one that works."

Just Curious what you all have been doing in your free time.
Link Posted: 9/3/2004 6:11:53 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/3/2004 6:13:56 AM EST by WaWaTuSi]
Did/Do Aikido- Not the best for self defense though got pretty much disalousioned with the machismo and new world samurai attitudes. Many were great but some were over the top in collusive fakery machismo.

Gracie Jiu-Jitsu under a Royler Gracie school.... (best 1 on 1 period)

Boxing- will whip your ass into shape FAST....... Perfect complement to Jiu-Jitsu.... Muay tai would be better but do to a groin pull can't consitantly kick....

a little Kali, Silat, Judo, Systema, sprinkled on top..



The key is to keep your BS detectors on high. no sparring should be a big time red flag, (not that you have to spar but that the school does not do it). Fancy moves and falls may look pretty but no one really falls like that (as in Aikido) IME (in my experience) in real life.

Link Posted: 9/3/2004 6:18:55 AM EST


The key is to keep your BS detectors on high. no sparring should be a big time red flag, (not that you have to spar but that the school does not do it). Fancy moves and falls may look pretty but no one really falls like that (as in Aikido) IME (in my experience).




I have to disagree. I've used Aikido many times for self defense. One of the primary goals of beginnig Aikido is to teach you how to fall and not get hurt. Sounds like you had/have a really poor Instructor if you think it isn't good for SD.

Link Posted: 9/3/2004 6:48:21 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/3/2004 9:07:47 AM EST by WaWaTuSi]

Originally Posted By DocDavis:


The key is to keep your BS detectors on high. no sparring should be a big time red flag, (not that you have to spar but that the school does not do it). Fancy moves and falls may look pretty but no one really falls like that (as in Aikido) IME (in my experience).




I have to disagree. I've used Aikido many times for self defense. One of the primary goals of beginnig Aikido is to teach you how to fall and not get hurt. Sounds like you had/have a really poor Instructor if you think it isn't good for SD.






If you consider Yamada Sensei and Sugano Sensei of the New York Aikikai and Stickles Sensei of Roselle park poor teachers then I would have to agree with you. I have also trained with Chiba, Ikeda, Saotome, Waite, and others to numerous to count. The first two I am sure you know are the representatives of hombu dojo in Japan for the US(and the USAF) and Yamada is head of the USAF. I was/am a 1st kyu in the USAF and was/am pretty competent in my Aiki skills and was good enough at ukemi that I was called on ad nauseum (in fact once my BJJ pals learned of my breakfall skills I am stuck helping them all practice take-downs and hip throws) :) . The only reason I am not a Shodan today is I personally felt the $350 fee was not worth it. I am not saying there is no benefit to Aikido but there is definatley a shortfall in its self defense effectiveness that is only multiplied by the fake new world samurai attitudes of some of the high level students. Most of which have never even challenged themselves in an open sparring situation nevermind an actual self defense situation. I have met and have practiced with very effective Aikido practicioners most if not all of them have crosstrained in other arts which I reccommend to anyone who does practice Aikido.
Link Posted: 9/3/2004 7:03:12 AM EST
I've wrestled, studied TKD, Tai Chi, and a hybrid art that incorporated Boxing, Muay Thai, Eskrima, Kung Fu and Jujitsu.

I finally came to the conclusion that anything worth fighting about is worth fighting dirty. Poke their eyes out, crush their trachea, shoot them or don't fight at all.
I haven't fought since.
Link Posted: 9/3/2004 7:10:26 AM EST
BJJ and Judo.
Had lots of fun until I was injured.
If a school was nearby I would jump at a chance for Krav Maga instruction!
IMHO, that is the best going right now!
Link Posted: 9/3/2004 7:17:53 AM EST

Originally Posted By thejokker:
i fought full contact karate back in the eighties. self-confidence under pressure... i'm still in excellent shape at fifty as a result.



+1...but aint close to 50 yet
Tang soo do (korean karate) was my base platform. Hapkido mixed in with it. In the 90's I started playing with sticks and did alot of SCA combat. Still stay involved and fight regularly.

Ya know...I just love the adrinalin of a physical fight.
Link Posted: 9/3/2004 7:19:17 AM EST
As I posted earlier I've trained many years in traditional styles. A few things I've learned is that martial arts have changed drastically over years. Many focus on sport and money. I've learned that cross training, or finding a good school that teaches cross training, is crucial.

I was a defensive tactics instructor for many years. Physical confrontation is a last resort. However, when it comes down to life or limb, there are no rules, there are no winners, only survivors. Your only objective is to do as much damage as possible as quickly as possible to create the ability to escape the situation. Any more than that and you become the aggressor and not the defender.

And I agrree, fancy, complicated Hollyweird moves and high kicking are for show.
Link Posted: 9/3/2004 7:31:33 AM EST
I did kickboxing for awhile. Not really martial arts, but along those lines.

I don't really know enough or am good enough to absolutly kill someone in a fight, but I'd be better prepared than most. Then I know what kind a punches to throw and how to throw them = good form is where its at guys!
Link Posted: 9/3/2004 7:35:27 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/3/2004 7:36:10 AM EST by StariVojnik]
I learned by way of the street. 2-3 guys at a time. The Fiore brothers were the worst. The last fight we had was almost 15 years ago. Sent both of them home crying their eyes out. I didn't get off to easy either, but I WON!



One night I came home late about 4 in the morning and 3 hispanic men approached me outside the subway station. The guy in the middle was the leader. I ran backward into him while he tried to punch me but his punch went over my shoulder, turned under him and got away. Nice move, the other two were shocked and couldn't figure out how quickly I slipped them. Then I reached for the heater in my coat pocket and they ran. My shoulder and neck hurt for a couple of days, I couldnt even go to sleep when I got home, I just laid in bed staring at the ceiling going over exactly what happened in my mind, over and over..... Post effects are weird when you go through something like that. This happened a few years ago in Queens.


Link Posted: 9/3/2004 7:48:10 AM EST
i spent 11 years of my life in semi-private TKD instruction. it helped me through my tumultuous teenage years and i find 80% of its techniques impracticle in the real world but it taught me not to be afraid of getting hit. in hindsight i would study something with more emphasis on hand techniques.

i am finding that the new Marine Corps martial arts program is excellent real world techniques that mesh very well with my TKD roots.
Link Posted: 9/3/2004 7:51:28 AM EST
American Inshiniryu

1st Degree Brown, 5 and 3/4 years. Black belt test next June..

What have I gotten out of it? Better strength, better flexibility, better mind discipline.

Plus, the Ju-Jitsu self defense moves rock.
Link Posted: 9/3/2004 8:05:28 AM EST
Started with Shotokan in school. Went on to Wado Ryu for about 10 years. Have taken various Bo, Jo and sword seminars. Moved and don't have anywhere close to train anymore.

Benefits are self confidence, flexibility, stamina.

Downside is it seems in the last few years the emphasis is sport sparring and not practical.
Link Posted: 9/3/2004 8:10:01 AM EST
Judo when I was in high school. Now I'm learning American Kenpo, under the Ed Parker system. It's fun, and gives me some good stretching and exercise once a week.
Link Posted: 9/3/2004 9:55:50 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/3/2004 9:57:31 AM EST by TomJefferson]
Link Posted: 9/3/2004 10:10:02 AM EST
I have just started studying Tang Soo Do, which was Chuck Norris' art before he tried his own style. Lil Ops has a yellow belt, and knows enough to dump me on my ass even when I see it coming. He has much improved concentration and self discipline, and I have a buncha sore muscles. OPs
Link Posted: 9/3/2004 10:41:58 AM EST
Kendo for years, traded it for ching ching pow
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