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Posted: 6/4/2008 4:08:40 PM EDT
For new riders that can be bolted on so a rider can learn proper shifting and such before letting them loose in a parking lot?

I searched and found them for small dirt bikes but that is all...
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 4:58:41 PM EDT
No. Wouldn't work on a motorcycle.

MSF course does a great job of teaching the controls to new riders.
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 5:06:00 PM EDT
if they need to learn a clutch find someone with a sport ATV to learn on first if that is a concern
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 5:15:01 PM EDT
We've got some jackass here in town on something like a Gold Wing that has a pair of tires bolted to it's frame.

It basically turns the thing into a trike because the wheels stick out so far.

And they are stylized to be matched to the bike itself, definitely a professional possibly aftermarket item.

Makes the bike about 2-3 feet wider than it would be otherwise.
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 5:15:20 PM EDT
There actually is a bike that has "training wheels", they come down at slow speeds and rise up at higher speeds.
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 5:18:08 PM EDT

Quoted:
For new riders that can be bolted on so a rider can learn proper shifting and such before letting them loose in a parking lot?

I searched and found them for small dirt bikes but that is all...


Yes and No.  They make stabilizing wheels that some paralyzed riders use that get deployed at low speed.  They operate on hydraulics.  The rider also uses a push button shifter like is found on Arctic Cat 4-wheelers.

It's a custom job which is high $$$.

The price wouldn't justify the wheels being used as training wheels.

The best option is the MSF class.  If that isn't possible then learning the friction point on the bike then puttering around in 1st gear on a low powered bike is possible.  Another option is for the person to learn how to use a clutch in a car then move to a bike.
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 5:42:59 PM EDT
This was discussed in GD a couple days ago.

www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=1&f=5&t=714992



A friend of mine, Steward Goddard was involved in a motorcycle accident, he became a paraplegic.

He wanted to ride, so he and another guy invented a set of retractable outriggers that would keep the motorcycle on two wheels.

He had it installed on his CBR900 street bike and on his race bike.

He velcroes his feet to the pegs and uses an electric thumb shifter.
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 5:47:54 PM EDT
If you can't/wont take the MSF course, then the following will work

You know that the clutch is the left handle-lever (not sure what the exact term to use would be here).

Make sure you are wearing ALL of your protective gear.
Keep your feet on ground through this entire exercize.
Start the bike, in a safe location (empty parking lot).
Grab lever.
Put bike in first, let idle, do not touch throttle.
Slowly let clutch out, and feel when it starts to grab, and then pull it again.
Repeat this until you know by heart where that point is.

Now, start to let out a bit more, etc.  

You can see how this is progressing.  

After you know where the clutch intially grabs, you can apply a bit of throttle, and let the clutch out slowly, so that you begin to move at a slow pace.  Then stop, and start going again.

Do this until you are ENTIRELY comfortable with what you are doing.

Stop there, go to bed, sleep on it.

Practice the next day, you MUST have complete control over the throttle/clutch in order to safely ride a bike.  You CANNOT be too good at it.



The bike wont fall over while it is moving, due to the gyroscopic force of the rear wheel.  

Just remember a few things.  Slow is good.  Don't put your feet on the pegs, as you only want to be traveling at a VERY SLOW pace, just enough to get the full range of the clutch, and then stopping the bike again, and repeating.  

The rest of the gears are easy to deal with, as you don't have to up the throttle in order to go from first to second, etc.  Nor do you have to have the same level of control over the clutch in order to from first to second, and so on.  

Whatever you do, do not let the clutch out slowly, nor open the throttle up any more than is needed to get the bike moving slowly (we are talking maybe 2k, depending on your bike, you may need more, may need less).

IF during any of this, you have problems, grab clutch, squeeze break, and come to a full stop, then put the bike in neutral, and think about what happened, and what you should do to prevent that problem.

THINK BEFORE YOU ACT!!

PLEASE TAKE THE MSF COURSE

Link Posted: 6/4/2008 5:53:19 PM EDT

Quoted:
If you can't/wont take the MSF course, then the following will work


Uhhh... I'm not asking for myself. I am a competent bike rider
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