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Posted: 12/11/2013 4:47:39 PM EST
I know, weird question, just curious. And by animals, I mean your standard mammals, quadrupeds if you will.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 4:48:31 PM EST
Standard mammals?

Link Posted: 12/11/2013 4:49:33 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/11/2013 4:50:02 PM EST by sharky30]
yes no maybe
some have a lot of close similarities, others are quite different
but I'm not an expert so I can't give examples
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 4:52:12 PM EST
Yes.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 4:52:26 PM EST
They all have the same general layout.

Hell, mammals, reptiles, birds, and amphibians share allot of similarities.


Link Posted: 12/11/2013 4:53:52 PM EST
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Originally Posted By NoVaGator:
Standard mammals?

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you know, like Standard Poodles. Not the little yippy ones, those are probably half insect.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 4:54:27 PM EST
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Originally Posted By hourglassing:

you know, like Standard Poodles. Not the little yippy ones, those are probably half insect.
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Originally Posted By hourglassing:
Originally Posted By NoVaGator:
Standard mammals?


you know, like Standard Poodles. Not the little yippy ones, those are probably half insect.


I didn't want some smartass to come in here and so "no, we don't have anything in common with dolphins or whales."
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 4:55:26 PM EST
Yes, in general. Obvious differences in bone configuration or count, but bones, organs and such are basically the same and do the same things.

This is why rabbits, dogs, pigs, monkeys and others are used for medical or product testing before human release.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 4:55:31 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 4:57:10 PM EST
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Originally Posted By mks99:
Yes, in general. Obvious differences in bone configuration or count, but bones, organs and such are basically the same and do the same things.

This is why rabbits, dogs, pigs, monkeys and others are used for medical or product testing before human release.
View Quote


I don't have a rumen.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 4:57:30 PM EST
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Originally Posted By mks99:
Yes, in general. Obvious differences in bone configuration or count, but bones, organs and such are basically the same and do the same things.

This is why rabbits, dogs, pigs, monkeys and others are used for medical or product testing before human release.
View Quote


Well the count of bones is another thing I was wondering about. When it comes to animals front feet, are they built identical to their rear feet (ie tarsals) or are they built like our hands, but they just use them to walk (ie carpals)
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 4:57:36 PM EST
Within very broad general rules, yes.

I think it's interesting that general anatomy of all mammals is so similar.

Once you've dissected any one of them you have a fair idea of how every other mammal is constructed,
what organs they have, and what they do.

Heart, lungs, kidneys, liver, pancreas, stomach, intestines, brain, eyes, whatever....it's pretty much the same
concept over and over and over again, and located in generally the same relative place in the body, whether it's
a shrew, a man, a horse, a rhinocerous, an elephant, or even a blue whale.

That alone, the simple fact that we share SO many similarities across the entire animal kingdom, should by itself
clue in ANYBODY with half a brain in on the obvious evidence that we are all related life forms that share common
ancestry from way far back in the past.

And to think, some of them are similar enough to us that there are people living and walking around today who
are alive because of parts transplanted into their bodies that were taken from pigs.

Link Posted: 12/11/2013 4:59:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/11/2013 5:00:20 PM EST by Headless_T_Gunner]
They all follow the same template.

A mouse and a giraffe have the same number of vertebrae.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:01:31 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Captain_Morgan:
http://i.imgur.com/VH3CulN.jpg
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Oh damn!
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:01:46 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Pony151515:


I didn't want some smartass to come in here and so "no, we don't have anything in common with dolphins or whales."
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Originally Posted By Pony151515:
Originally Posted By hourglassing:
Originally Posted By NoVaGator:
Standard mammals?


you know, like Standard Poodles. Not the little yippy ones, those are probably half insect.


I didn't want some smartass to come in here and so "no, we don't have anything in common with dolphins or whales."

There is a manatee skeleton at the cincinnati zoo and its damn hard to look at that thing and see the connection to a dog skeleton. Where are the fucking hips?

I know, adaption and all that, but its certainly not intuitive that they are related to hippos or elephants or whatever.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:03:23 PM EST
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Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
Within very broad general rules, yes.

I think it's interesting that general anatomy of all mammals is so similar.

Once you've dissected any one of them you have a fair idea of how every other mammal is constructed,
what organs they have, and what they do.

Heart, lungs, kidneys, liver, pancreas, stomach, intestines, brain, eyes, whatever....it's pretty much the same
concept over and over and over again, and located in generally the same relative place in the body, whether it's
a shrew, a man, a horse, a rhinocerous, an elephant, or even a blue whale.

That alone, the simple fact that we share SO many similarities across the entire animal kingdom, should by itself
clue in ANYBODY with half a brain in on the obvious evidence that we are all related life forms that share common
ancestry from way far back in the past.

And to think, some of them are similar enough to us that there are people living and walking around today who
are alive because of parts transplanted into their bodies that were taken from pigs.

View Quote


Yeah..it's weird the other day when my cat was laying on my lap, I was petting her and noticed her bony landmarks were, for the most part, identical to yours or mine. It had me wondering since then.


Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:03:29 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Pony151515:


Well the count of bones is another thing I was wondering about. When it comes to animals front feet, are they built identical to their rear feet (ie tarsals) or are they built like our hands, but they just use them to walk (ie carpals)
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Originally Posted By Pony151515:
Originally Posted By mks99:
Yes, in general. Obvious differences in bone configuration or count, but bones, organs and such are basically the same and do the same things.

This is why rabbits, dogs, pigs, monkeys and others are used for medical or product testing before human release.


Well the count of bones is another thing I was wondering about. When it comes to animals front feet, are they built identical to their rear feet (ie tarsals) or are they built like our hands, but they just use them to walk (ie carpals)


Ya know ya could save yourself a lot of grief by looking this simple shit up instead of asking art. However we LOVE stupid interogitive statements.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:06:12 PM EST
not sure if you should smoke more or less pot.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:06:36 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:06:40 PM EST
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Originally Posted By stutzcattle:


I don't have a rumen.
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Originally Posted By stutzcattle:
Originally Posted By mks99:
Yes, in general. Obvious differences in bone configuration or count, but bones, organs and such are basically the same and do the same things.

This is why rabbits, dogs, pigs, monkeys and others are used for medical or product testing before human release.


I don't have a rumen.


Work on it. You'll get better.

A cheap lap band surgery can give you two stomachs if you really want one.

Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:08:35 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/11/2013 5:16:02 PM EST by C-4]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mks99:
Yes, in general. Obvious differences in bone configuration or count, but bones, organs and such are basically the same and do the same things.

This is why rabbits, dogs, pigs, monkeys and others are used for medical or product testing before human release.
View Quote


+1

If you take an embryology or comparative anatomy class you can see and understand the similarities more clearly. ETA: Ever wonder why a fish's kidney is so long? The kidney cells migrate distally just as they do for humans. But instead of the cells degenerating as the more distal ones form as it happens in human development, they remain intact.


Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:11:06 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/11/2013 5:33:30 PM EST by joker1]
Well one exception would be the baculum or os penis most other mammals have.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:12:00 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/11/2013 5:13:29 PM EST by Pony151515]
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Originally Posted By scottfire1957:


Ya know ya could save yourself a lot of grief by looking this simple shit up instead of asking art. However we LOVE stupid interogitive statements.
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Originally Posted By scottfire1957:
Originally Posted By Pony151515:
Originally Posted By mks99:
Yes, in general. Obvious differences in bone configuration or count, but bones, organs and such are basically the same and do the same things.

This is why rabbits, dogs, pigs, monkeys and others are used for medical or product testing before human release.


Well the count of bones is another thing I was wondering about. When it comes to animals front feet, are they built identical to their rear feet (ie tarsals) or are they built like our hands, but they just use them to walk (ie carpals)


Ya know ya could save yourself a lot of grief by looking this simple shit up instead of asking art. However we LOVE stupid interogitive statements.


There are people from all walks of life on this forum..sorry if I thought I could get serious responses...which I actually have I find human anatomy very fascinating, and have noticed some similarities in mammals, though I am no expert in them.

ETA other mammals
And like I said, the thing that I wondered the most were if animals front paws (which they use like we use feet) are built like feet, or if they are built like hands.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:13:35 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Headless_T_Gunner:
They all follow the same template.

A mouse and a giraffe have the same number of vertebrae.
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All mammals have 7 (cervical) no?
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:14:08 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Pony151515:


I didn't want some smartass to come in here and so "no, we don't have anything in common with dolphins or whales."
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Originally Posted By Pony151515:
Originally Posted By hourglassing:
Originally Posted By NoVaGator:
Standard mammals?


you know, like Standard Poodles. Not the little yippy ones, those are probably half insect.


I didn't want some smartass to come in here and so "no, we don't have anything in common with dolphins or whales."


Judging by your post count and join date it looks like you have more in common with whales than you think!
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:18:14 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:19:17 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Pony151515:

There are people from all walks of life on this forum..sorry if I thought I could get serious responses...which I actually have I find human anatomy very fascinating, and have noticed some similarities in mammals, though I am no expert in them.

ETA other mammals
And like I said, the thing that I wondered the most were if animals front paws (which they use like we use feet) are built like feet, or if they are built like hands.
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Originally Posted By Pony151515:
Originally Posted By scottfire1957:
Originally Posted By Pony151515:
Originally Posted By mks99:
Yes, in general. Obvious differences in bone configuration or count, but bones, organs and such are basically the same and do the same things.

This is why rabbits, dogs, pigs, monkeys and others are used for medical or product testing before human release.


Well the count of bones is another thing I was wondering about. When it comes to animals front feet, are they built identical to their rear feet (ie tarsals) or are they built like our hands, but they just use them to walk (ie carpals)


Ya know ya could save yourself a lot of grief by looking this simple shit up instead of asking art. However we LOVE stupid interogitive statements.

There are people from all walks of life on this forum..sorry if I thought I could get serious responses...which I actually have I find human anatomy very fascinating, and have noticed some similarities in mammals, though I am no expert in them.

ETA other mammals
And like I said, the thing that I wondered the most were if animals front paws (which they use like we use feet) are built like feet, or if they are built like hands.


As I said. Really. You can look it up. Xrays of animal feet are online. Pull up and compare.

Then again ask away. More for at which to roll our eyes.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:21:21 PM EST
Lol.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:21:27 PM EST
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Originally Posted By FMJshooter:


All mammals have 7 (cervical) no?
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Originally Posted By FMJshooter:
Originally Posted By Headless_T_Gunner:
They all follow the same template.

A mouse and a giraffe have the same number of vertebrae.


All mammals have 7 (cervical) no?



Yep. 12 thoracic. Same same.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:24:44 PM EST
There are similarities in that many of the bones serve similar purposes. Though not all of them do, most quad bones have a human counterpart. Mammal bones in general are easy to identify as mammals rather than birds, fish, etc.

However, that's where the similarities end. The joint processes are different due to adaptions to different weight loading and the muscle attachments are also different.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:24:46 PM EST
"Nothing in Biology Makes Sense Except in the Light of Evolution"


Have a look at embryonic chickens, pigs, dogs, humans.
Try to pick which is lunch, breakfast, best friend or brother.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:26:50 PM EST
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Originally Posted By scottfire1957:


As I said. Really. You can look it up. Xrays of animal feet are online. Pull up and compare.

Then again ask away. More for at which to roll our eyes.
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Originally Posted By scottfire1957:
Originally Posted By Pony151515:
Originally Posted By scottfire1957:
Originally Posted By Pony151515:
Originally Posted By mks99:
Yes, in general. Obvious differences in bone configuration or count, but bones, organs and such are basically the same and do the same things.

This is why rabbits, dogs, pigs, monkeys and others are used for medical or product testing before human release.


Well the count of bones is another thing I was wondering about. When it comes to animals front feet, are they built identical to their rear feet (ie tarsals) or are they built like our hands, but they just use them to walk (ie carpals)


Ya know ya could save yourself a lot of grief by looking this simple shit up instead of asking art. However we LOVE stupid interogitive statements.

There are people from all walks of life on this forum..sorry if I thought I could get serious responses...which I actually have I find human anatomy very fascinating, and have noticed some similarities in mammals, though I am no expert in them.

ETA other mammals
And like I said, the thing that I wondered the most were if animals front paws (which they use like we use feet) are built like feet, or if they are built like hands.


As I said. Really. You can look it up. Xrays of animal feet are online. Pull up and compare.

Then again ask away. More for at which to roll our eyes.


Or I could assume there are some vets on here that could offer up some real insight.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:27:13 PM EST
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Originally Posted By TheGrayMan:
No.
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Feeling verbose today, eh?
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:27:23 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:30:46 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Pony151515:


I didn't want some smartass to come in here and so "no, we don't have anything in common with dolphins or whales."
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Originally Posted By Pony151515:
Originally Posted By hourglassing:
Originally Posted By NoVaGator:
Standard mammals?


you know, like Standard Poodles. Not the little yippy ones, those are probably half insect.


I didn't want some smartass to come in here and so "no, we don't have anything in common with dolphins or whales."

Whales
And now imagine a whale skeleton. It bears some similarity to the human one, like the rib cage and five sets of “finger” bones. It even has a pelvis, albeit a highly reduced one that assumes no role like it does in humans.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:33:03 PM EST
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Originally Posted By mks99:


Work on it. You'll get better.

A cheap lap band surgery can give you two stomachs if you really want one.

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Originally Posted By mks99:
Originally Posted By stutzcattle:
Originally Posted By mks99:
Yes, in general. Obvious differences in bone configuration or count, but bones, organs and such are basically the same and do the same things.

This is why rabbits, dogs, pigs, monkeys and others are used for medical or product testing before human release.


I don't have a rumen.


Work on it. You'll get better.

A cheap lap band surgery can give you two stomachs if you really want one.



Reticulum, rumen, omasum, abomasum.....I want it all.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:36:21 PM EST
Not really.

A horse's front hoof is more or less equivalent to one of your fingers (index finger I think) and the hoof itself is like your fingernail.

There are similarities but there isn't a one-to-one correspondence.

Some whales have vestigial rear leg bones that don't help them much but correspond to your leg bones.

Biology is cool.

Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:48:50 PM EST
Yes and no, I guess.

Architecturally, mammal bones should follow the same basic plan as human bones; trabecular and cortical, Haversian canal systems and osteocytes, collagen and mineral composition, periosteum cover, hematopoiesis in marrow cavity, etc.

On the other hand, animal bone is typically less porous, denser and thicker in cross section that humans. Animal bones also largely lack trabecula in leg bone diaphyses. Osteons in animal bones are aligned in rows (osteon banding) linky
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:54:18 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Oiparhon:
Yes and no, I guess.

Architecturally, mammal bones should follow the same basic plan as human bones; trabecular and cortical, Haversian canal systems and osteocytes, collagen and mineral composition, periosteum cover, hematopoiesis in marrow cavity, etc.

On the other hand, animal bone is typically less porous, denser and thicker in cross section that humans. Animal bones also largely lack trabecula in leg bone diaphyses. Osteons in animal bones are aligned in rows (osteon banding) linky
View Quote


Interesting, do you think the reason human bones are less dense is because we walk upright, and thus must work against gravity more than animals that walk on all fours?
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:54:59 PM EST
Tell us, in more detail, what you mean by "bone structure".

Such as, "Are the bones made the same?", "Are they articulated the same?"etc.

The knees of bats work "in reverse" to the knees of humans.

In short, WTF are you asking?

Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:56:47 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/11/2013 5:58:01 PM EST by KingRat]
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Originally Posted By kelone:
"Nothing in Biology Makes Sense Except in the Light of Evolution"


Have a look at embryonic chickens, pigs, dogs, humans.
Try to pick which is lunch, breakfast, best friend or brother.
View Quote


Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:59:55 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Him:
Tell us, in more detail, what you mean by "bone structure".

Such as, "Are the bones made the same?", "Are they articulated the same?"etc.

The knees of bats work "in reverse" to the knees of humans.

In short, WTF are you asking?

View Quote


general anatomy.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 6:10:15 PM EST
wat?
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 6:11:56 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Pony151515:

Interesting, do you think the reason human bones are less dense is because we walk upright, and thus must work against gravity more than animals that walk on all fours?
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Originally Posted By Pony151515:
Originally Posted By Oiparhon:
.....
On the other hand, animal bone is typically less porous, denser and thicker in cross section that humans. Animal bones also largely lack trabecula in leg bone diaphyses. Osteons in animal bones are aligned in rows (osteon banding) linky

Interesting, do you think the reason human bones are less dense is because we walk upright, and thus must work against gravity more than animals that walk on all fours?

I kind of doubt that there is an appreciable difference in gravity between walking on all fours and walking upright. If we had to adopt to flying, that might be a different story. I just think evolution has made us into pansies; we've lost the bone density, the powerful muscles and claws, the tough hide and fur insulation, to such a degree that even a cat can seriously mess us up.

Of course, I'm no expert, just another grad student wasting his time before finals
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 3:43:23 AM EST
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Originally Posted By LePew:
Not really.

A horse's front hoof is more or less equivalent to one of your fingers (index finger I think) and the hoof itself is like your fingernail.

There are similarities but there isn't a one-to-one correspondence.

Some whales have vestigial rear leg bones that don't help them much but correspond to your leg bones.

Biology is cool.

View Quote
All four horse hooves are their middle fingers. The two fingers on each side remain only in the form of the splint bone, next to the cannon bone.
In time it is expected that the splint bone will merge with the cannon bone, creating an efficient leg structure with no supernumerary parts.

It's interesting that in the case of grazing animal, evolution moved them AWAY from developing hands, going to simpler, more robust structures
instead (not that any person with much experience with horses would actually call a horse's legs "robust" as foot and leg problems are anything
but rare) of evolving complex hand structures which are arguably a gateway to developing higher intelligence.


Speed or brains...choose one. Horses chose speed.

Link Posted: 12/12/2013 3:51:04 AM EST



avian bone structure is lighter and internally much different
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