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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 3/16/2006 5:42:39 PM EDT
Just curious if anybody thinks that the addition of a light to their firearms would incline someone to draw their weapon just for the reason of using the light in situations were just a normal flashligth was used in the past. What kind of training is typically provided that addresses proper uses for the light ? I would think its not a good idea to sweep your gun around for no other reason than illumination.

Just as a hypothetical situation: Deputy wants to illuminate the trunk of the car during a stop, left his regular light in the car, just pulls his handgun and shines his gun's light around in the trunk.

I've never seen lights on regular service firearms around here, the SWAT guys and such might have stuff like that though for their operations, just haven't seen them on regualr patrol deputies/policemen, etc.


Deputies get gun lights, special holsters

SAN DIEGO ---- Sheriff's deputies will no longer have to peer into dark rooms or fields when going after suspects, because they're getting lights for their guns and special holsters to hold them.

The San Diego County Honorary Deputy Sheriffs Association has donated 400 of the tactical lights and holsters to the Sheriff's Department, saving the agency almost $70,000, officials said Tuesday at the San Diego Public Training Institute at the Miramar College campus.

"In the past we've had to use a flashlight in conjunction with the weapon," said weapons training Sgt. John Pokorny. "Now you have the other hand free."

Most shootings, Pokorny said, happen in situations with low light.

Pat Rippetoe, president of the 650-member association, said the Sheriff's Department asked the service organization for the donation so all the deputies will have the lights and holsters.

In the past, the association has bought such things as maintenance tools for the county's two new firefighting helicopters, tactical communications headsets for the sheriff's SWAT team and trauma kits for San Diego police cars.


http://www.nctimes.com/articles/2006/03/17/news/sandiego/14_20_453_14_06.txt
Link Posted: 3/16/2006 6:08:56 PM EDT
around here, the deputies who have weaponlights also carry one of the newer flashlights as well (surefire or whatever), and they resort to their non-weapon light for most occasions.

Its just another tool, and modern lights allow the officer to carry both a weapon light and a regular light.
Link Posted: 3/16/2006 6:14:59 PM EDT
I dont think it will be an issue, most officers do not want to be drawing their weapons for dumb reasons..
Link Posted: 3/16/2006 6:18:04 PM EDT
Only morons would think that.
More powerful light usually right on the belt
Link Posted: 3/16/2006 6:20:26 PM EDT
heard about a guy around here got in trouble for putting his glock with a M3 under his arm so he could see while writing a tickets
Link Posted: 3/16/2006 6:20:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sixgunsblazing:
Only morons would think that.
More powerful light usually right on the belt



Yep. How many citizen complaints will the sheriff take of "he pointed the gun at me for no reason" before heads will roll?
Link Posted: 3/16/2006 6:22:26 PM EDT
Tom Diaz agrees with your assesment
Link Posted: 3/16/2006 6:42:19 PM EDT
When a light is mounted to the firearm it becomes a part of the weapon system. Sooooooooooooooooooo, the weapon shouldn't leave the holster under any different circumstances than before the light was added and this will be the case 99.9% of the time. Sadly there will always be "that guy" that does something stupid with it.


Lights on weapons are a very valuable tool and something all departments need to go to.
Link Posted: 3/16/2006 6:45:37 PM EDT
Most will do fine, some will muck it up............

just like the ARFCOM population......
Link Posted: 3/16/2006 6:50:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/16/2006 7:01:27 PM EDT by BlueCrusader]

Originally Posted By sixgunsblazing:
Only morons would think that.
More powerful light usually right on the belt



+1

Every cop here uses the 6004 w/light shroud. I have yet to see a guy on my dept or any dept I come into contact with who doesn't have a surefire or streamlight on his belt as well as a ring for the old standby maglite.


Originally Posted By LANCEMAN:
Just curious if anybody thinks that the addition of a light to their firearms would incline someone to draw their weapon just for the reason of using the light in situations were just a normal flashligth was used in the past.


No.


What kind of training is typically provided that addresses proper uses for the light ? I would think its not a good idea to sweep your gun around for no other reason than illumination.


All guns are always loaded. Never point your weapon at anything you are not perpared to destroy, etc etc. You are correct in your assesment.


Just as a hypothetical situation: Deputy wants to illuminate the trunk of the car during a stop, left his regular light in the car, just pulls his handgun and shines his gun's light around in the trunk.


Depends on the situation. Have I secured the occupants of the vehicle? Do I think there is a dude with a gun in the trunk?


I've never seen lights on regular service firearms around here, the SWAT guys and such might have stuff like that though for their operations, just haven't seen them on regualr patrol deputies/policemen, etc.


See above. Everyone here is issued them now. If not, your town is in the stone-age, tactically speaking.



BC

Link Posted: 3/16/2006 6:54:33 PM EDT
Sheriff's deputies will no longer have to peer into dark rooms or fields when going after suspects, because they're getting lights for their guns and special holsters to hold them.
...
"In the past we've had to use a flashlight in conjunction with the weapon," said weapons training Sgt. John Pokorny. "Now you have the other hand free."

Hmm, the writer of this article seems to be under the conclusion that flashlights were not used when sheriff's deputies were peering into dark rooms or fields. What a bozo.
Link Posted: 3/16/2006 7:02:18 PM EDT
Many departments have a policy of having specific paperwork being required to be filled out whenever a deputy or officer draw their weapon for any reason.

Because of this, I don't think that LEO's will be resorting to using their weapon lights for reading peoples drivers licenses during car stops.

Chris
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