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Posted: 1/2/2016 12:44:07 AM EDT
Dehumidifier worth the money?

Wondering if anyone who lives in a humid climate thinks these things make a difference in the home??

Thanks!
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 12:44:46 AM EDT
living in mom's basement has become uncomfortable?
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 12:49:31 AM EDT
If by humid you mean Qatar in August, you bet your ass they are worth it.
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 12:52:13 AM EDT
They're worth it here on the Gulf Coast.  I have a 70 pint Frigidaire that is especially nice to run in the bathroom during/after showering in the summer.
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 12:52:33 AM EDT
Are you talking a whole house dehumidifier, or one of those things you buy at Lowes?
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 12:53:21 AM EDT
If your home is sealed well with a vapor barrier, a dehumidifier will pull the humidity level down.  Only thing is, usually if the humidity is high you are also likely running the a/c, so that should drain the humidity out of the air, and keep you cool at the same time.

Dehumidifiers are energy hogs, just like the a/c is.
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 1:51:29 AM EDT
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Dehumidifiers are energy hogs, just like the a/c is.
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They are small a/c units, so it should be no surprise that they use the same amount of electricity.


Link Posted: 1/2/2016 2:00:48 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Blackoperations:
Dehumidifier worth the money?

Wondering if anyone who lives in a humid climate thinks these things make a difference in the home??

Thanks!
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Yes
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 2:02:37 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By NorthBridge:

Yes
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Originally Posted By NorthBridge:
Originally Posted By Blackoperations:
Dehumidifier worth the money?

Wondering if anyone who lives in a humid climate thinks these things make a difference in the home??

Thanks!

Yes


Seconded.
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 11:04:37 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Mackinaw:
If your home is sealed well with a vapor barrier, a dehumidifier will pull the humidity level down.  Only thing is, usually if the humidity is high you are also likely running the a/c, so that should drain the humidity out of the air, and keep you cool at the same time.

Dehumidifiers are energy hogs, just like the a/c is.
View Quote

While an AC does remove humidity from the air, because it does it's worked based on temperature and not the relative humidity level, you can get down to the temp setting but still have high humidity.  A whole house dehumidifier will remove the humidity while leaving your temperature relatively stable.

And a whole house dehumidifier like the Honeywell DR120 only pulls 7.3 amps while most AC's pull 14+ amps.  And you can be comfortable at a higher temperature if the humidity level is controlled.

In short, yes, get a whole house dehumidifier.
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 11:08:02 AM EDT
I run one in the A/C'd electrical inventory storage for my business. The air in there is noticeably different, much "crisper" and dry.
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 11:09:07 AM EDT
I have one, it sure can help.
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 11:10:33 AM EDT
Yes.
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 11:12:32 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Blackoperations:
Dehumidifier worth the money?

Wondering if anyone who lives in a humid climate thinks these things make a difference in the home??

Thanks!
View Quote


This a serious question?

YOU LIVE IN FLORIDA!

I have one or two running constantly and I am in Indiana.
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 11:12:51 AM EDT
Just went through the attic and removed our 1994 heat pump and original 1981 ductwork that was designed by drunks. Pulled out all the old insulation as well. New Carrier system went in with all new duct work, whole house dehumidifier and blown in insulation. Come summertime here in Southeast Texas I will be able to give a review. Hoping to report good things as it was not real cheap...
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 11:27:41 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/2/2016 11:34:48 AM EDT by gODZOOKIE]
I bought a commercial one to put in my crawl space. I don't remember how much it drew but the hose was constantly draining it, so it was definitely working

The problem was that I never could get a good enough seal because of expansion/contraction and I was constantly plugging cracks, either around the sill, the access panel, vents, etc.
Stayed damp under there until the vapor barrier did it's trick (along with ventilation in the summer) and the wood joists and sill finally dried

So as someone mentioned above, I could see where they would help but the house would have to be very well sealed along with a large enough unit to effectively deal with the opening and closing of exterior doors
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 11:31:17 AM EDT
I'm interested in one as well.  I have a 180 gallon aquarium and it puts a lot of moisture in the air.

Winter (when the humidity is low) and summer when the AC is running is OK
but during spring and fall the humidity gets pretty high.

Link Posted: 1/2/2016 11:41:04 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By alphajaguars:

While an AC does remove humidity from the air, because it does it's worked based on temperature and not the relative humidity level, you can get down to the temp setting but still have high humidity.  A whole house dehumidifier will remove the humidity while leaving your temperature relatively stable.

And a whole house dehumidifier like the Honeywell DR120 only pulls 7.3 amps while most AC's pull 14+ amps.  And you can be comfortable at a higher temperature if the humidity level is controlled.

In short, yes, get a whole house dehumidifier.
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Originally Posted By alphajaguars:
Originally Posted By Mackinaw:
If your home is sealed well with a vapor barrier, a dehumidifier will pull the humidity level down.  Only thing is, usually if the humidity is high you are also likely running the a/c, so that should drain the humidity out of the air, and keep you cool at the same time.

Dehumidifiers are energy hogs, just like the a/c is.

While an AC does remove humidity from the air, because it does it's worked based on temperature and not the relative humidity level, you can get down to the temp setting but still have high humidity.  A whole house dehumidifier will remove the humidity while leaving your temperature relatively stable.

And a whole house dehumidifier like the Honeywell DR120 only pulls 7.3 amps while most AC's pull 14+ amps.  And you can be comfortable at a higher temperature if the humidity level is controlled.

In short, yes, get a whole house dehumidifier.


Agreed, but there's no free lunch.  Although the DR120 only pulls 7.3 amps compared to the 14+ amps of a typical a/c unit, you will find without a/c running the dehumidifier will probably run twice as much anyway.

Correct answer is get both.  

The most energy efficient way to dehumidify is to sub cool then reheat the air going to your space.  Probably not an option with your residential unit.


Link Posted: 1/2/2016 11:45:11 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Mr_Harry:
I'm interested in one as well.  I have a 180 gallon aquarium and it puts a lot of moisture in the air.

Winter (when the humidity is low) and summer when the AC is running is OK
but during spring and fall the humidity gets pretty high.

View Quote

I get bad humidity in my basement. A few years ago mold started to grow. After I cleaned the mold I bought a dehumidifier, it works great. In early spring I get about 2 gallons of moisture out of the air daily. Been running one for almost 3 years, no more mold. It did increase my electric bill by $20 a month though.
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 11:46:35 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By rhygin:


Seconded.
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Originally Posted By rhygin:
Originally Posted By NorthBridge:
Originally Posted By Blackoperations:
Dehumidifier worth the money?

Wondering if anyone who lives in a humid climate thinks these things make a difference in the home??

Thanks!

Yes


Seconded.


+87
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 11:54:23 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 11:55:59 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Mackinaw:


Agreed, but there's no free lunch.  Although the DR120 only pulls 7.3 amps compared to the 14+ amps of a typical a/c unit, you will find without a/c running the dehumidifier will probably run twice as much anyway.

Correct answer is get both.  

The most energy efficient way to dehumidify is to sub cool then reheat the air going to your space.  Probably not an option with your residential unit.


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Originally Posted By Mackinaw:
Originally Posted By alphajaguars:
Originally Posted By Mackinaw:
If your home is sealed well with a vapor barrier, a dehumidifier will pull the humidity level down.  Only thing is, usually if the humidity is high you are also likely running the a/c, so that should drain the humidity out of the air, and keep you cool at the same time.

Dehumidifiers are energy hogs, just like the a/c is.

While an AC does remove humidity from the air, because it does it's worked based on temperature and not the relative humidity level, you can get down to the temp setting but still have high humidity.  A whole house dehumidifier will remove the humidity while leaving your temperature relatively stable.

And a whole house dehumidifier like the Honeywell DR120 only pulls 7.3 amps while most AC's pull 14+ amps.  And you can be comfortable at a higher temperature if the humidity level is controlled.

In short, yes, get a whole house dehumidifier.


Agreed, but there's no free lunch.  Although the DR120 only pulls 7.3 amps compared to the 14+ amps of a typical a/c unit, you will find without a/c running the dehumidifier will probably run twice as much anyway.

Correct answer is get both.  

The most energy efficient way to dehumidify is to sub cool then reheat the air going to your space.  Probably not an option with your residential unit.



First Company makes an hydronic air handler with the heating coil after the cooling coil.  Had a contractor use one of those for a dehum/reheat solution for an indoor pool.
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 12:00:03 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 12:01:37 PM EDT
Think that depends on your situation.
There were times of the  year when the basement at my parents house growing up absolutely needed a humidifier to keep things tolerable.
During the winter when the wood heat was going it wasn't so bad. Summer, yeah, dehumidifier was essential.
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 12:02:09 PM EDT
No. No worth it in my AO. Why don't you move to a state where the air you breath isn't hostile?

Winter the wall heater, wood fireplace, and Hvac dry the air (95% and 40 degrees now). We are in a drought, but everything is constantly wet. Summer it's 90-110 degrees with 10-40% humidity pending temperature. Pretty common to see 95 degrees and 20%, which is perfect bikini weather.
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 12:05:14 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By CLICKBANGBANG:
No. No worth it in my AO. Why don't you move to a state where the air you breath isn't hostile?

Winter the wall heater, wood fireplace, and Hvac dry the air (95% and 40 degrees now). We are in a drought, but everything is constantly wet. Summer it's 90-110 degrees with 10-40% humidity pending temperature. Pretty common to see 95 degrees and 20%, which is perfect bikini weather.
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At 20% RH all the wood in your house is drying out and splitting.
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 12:10:48 PM EDT
I have a dehumidifier in my basement,  and it keeps the humidity down to the point where I can safely use the basement for storage of what ever I want.  It is an automatic unit, so I set the humidity and leave it plugged in and it runs when it needs to.  


My washing machine is running a load now and it is holding steady at 50% humidity.
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 12:10:54 PM EDT
I put a typical basement unit in my gun room and set it to as low a RH setting as it would go. The thing runs constantly and was well worth it. I bought one with a built in pump to take care of the water since I didn't feel like building a contraption with a harbor freight pump.
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 12:15:48 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By AspiringSamsquanch:
I put a typical basement unit in my gun room and set it to as low a RH setting as it would go. The thing runs constantly and was well worth it. I bought one with a built in pump to take care of the water since I didn't feel like building a contraption with a harbor freight pump.
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When I was setting mine up, I googled site:Arfcom (because the search function sucks), and I found some claims that the NRA museum has their humidity SRT atn50-55%

Link Posted: 1/2/2016 1:35:28 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By I_am_Dan:



When I was setting mine up, I googled site:Arfcom (because the search function sucks), and I found some claims that the NRA museum has their humidity SRT atn50-55%

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Originally Posted By I_am_Dan:
Originally Posted By AspiringSamsquanch:
I put a typical basement unit in my gun room and set it to as low a RH setting as it would go. The thing runs constantly and was well worth it. I bought one with a built in pump to take care of the water since I didn't feel like building a contraption with a harbor freight pump.



When I was setting mine up, I googled site:Arfcom (because the search function sucks), and I found some claims that the NRA museum has their humidity SRT atn50-55%


If you get the humidity too low the wood dries out and cracks.  That's why you want to dehumidify during the spring and summer, but humidify during the fall and winter.

45% RH is about ideal for the average home.
Link Posted: 1/2/2016 1:36:53 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By alphajaguars:

If you get the humidity too low the wood dries out and cracks.  That's why you want to dehumidify during the spring and summer, but humidify during the fall and winter.

45% RH is about ideal for the average home.
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Originally Posted By alphajaguars:
Originally Posted By I_am_Dan:
Originally Posted By AspiringSamsquanch:
I put a typical basement unit in my gun room and set it to as low a RH setting as it would go. The thing runs constantly and was well worth it. I bought one with a built in pump to take care of the water since I didn't feel like building a contraption with a harbor freight pump.



When I was setting mine up, I googled site:Arfcom (because the search function sucks), and I found some claims that the NRA museum has their humidity SRT atn50-55%


If you get the humidity too low the wood dries out and cracks.  That's why you want to dehumidify during the spring and summer, but humidify during the fall and winter.

45% RH is about ideal for the average home.



If your house gets too dry you will get nose bleeds and it seemed like we got sick more often

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