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Posted: 12/1/2018 11:48:12 PM EST
I have a D7200 that I’m perfectly happy with, but the Adorama emails in my inbox are tempting me and I want o go full frame (mostly full frame lenses anyway).

Is the D750 worthwhile versus my D7200, or should I just wait a bit and buy the D850?

I’ve invested mostly in glass to date, and have a wide range of photography interests. Everything from portraits to landscapes.
Link Posted: 12/1/2018 11:57:45 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/2/2018 12:36:47 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Zack3g:
What sort of shooting do you do, and what do you think the D750 will do better?

The IQ will be about on par with each other, the ISO performance won't be that far off. They're both ~24MP sensors, so you'll be cropping the D750 more (and losing the full frame ~stop or so noise advantage) so unless you're primarily shooting stuff that fills the frame ( think landscapes / portraits ) you'd be as well or better served by the D7200 you already have.
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That’s what I’m wondering. I do shoot a lot of wildlife, in which case I’m imagining it won’t make a difference.

So it’s really for portraits and landscapes.

That and the fact that photography has been a pretty serious hobby for me for about 12 years and I’ve never had a full frame camera so want to see what, if anything, I’m missing.
Link Posted: 12/2/2018 12:41:40 AM EST
Link Posted: 12/2/2018 12:56:38 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Zack3g:
I bought a D750 because I had the same questions you had.

I then sold the D750 because while the full frame look came in handy occasionally, it wasn't really pulling its weight with the shooting I was doing. The D500 was a better camera to keep for me.

My interests are mainly wildlife and macro, two disciplines that crop sensors excel at. The occasional bit of portrait/street/landscape/etc that I do couldn't justify the cash tie up in the D750.

The only full frame that would make sense for me is the D850, as it's got a similar pixel density to the D500 so cropping it would never be any worse than the D500 which is pretty damn good.

That's something to consider as well, shake things up and get a used D850.
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Originally Posted By Zack3g:
Originally Posted By 999monkeys:

That’s what I’m wondering. I do shoot a lot of wildlife, in which case I’m imagining it won’t make a difference.

So it’s really for portraits and landscapes.

That and the fact that photography has been a pretty serious hobby for me for about 12 years and I’ve never had a full frame camera so want to see what, if anything, I’m missing.
I bought a D750 because I had the same questions you had.

I then sold the D750 because while the full frame look came in handy occasionally, it wasn't really pulling its weight with the shooting I was doing. The D500 was a better camera to keep for me.

My interests are mainly wildlife and macro, two disciplines that crop sensors excel at. The occasional bit of portrait/street/landscape/etc that I do couldn't justify the cash tie up in the D750.

The only full frame that would make sense for me is the D850, as it's got a similar pixel density to the D500 so cropping it would never be any worse than the D500 which is pretty damn good.

That's something to consider as well, shake things up and get a used D850.
Thanks, that confirms my thinking and is the reason I’ve haven’t pulled the trigger on it for the last few days.

I’ll hold off.
Link Posted: 12/2/2018 7:48:30 AM EST
You might consider renting one. I did that for a vacation one year to test whether full frame was right for me (it is), and it's a great way to try before you buy. LensRentals.com has served me well.
Link Posted: 12/2/2018 2:59:13 PM EST
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Originally Posted By tknogeek:
You might consider renting one. I did that for a vacation one year to test whether full frame was right for me (it is), and it's a great way to try before you buy. LensRentals.com has served me well.
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Thanks, good suggestion
Link Posted: 12/2/2018 5:23:48 PM EST
+1 on Zack’s post. Honestly if I didn’t need the wider shots for aurora and similar, I’d have picked up a D500 instead of a D850. Rent a D750 and see how FX feels to you, as coming from a DX body the perceived change in lenses is a bit disconcerting. Figure a 70-200mm f/2.8 looks like exactly that on a FX camera, but on a DX it looks equivalent of a 135-300mm f/2.8 due to sensor size changes, plus you’re using the ‘sweet spot’ of the glass so things can be sharper, more contrasts, etc. Mostly it’s because the sensor is using the sharpest parts of the lens instead of the full thing. That said, I’d absolutely invest in quality FX glass either way.
Link Posted: 12/3/2018 12:27:16 AM EST
look around and pick up a cheap D700.

i luv mine.
Link Posted: 12/3/2018 1:23:59 AM EST
Link Posted: 12/3/2018 1:35:34 AM EST
i can only talk from my experience as the boyfriend of a professional couples and landscape photographer for the past few years but... we had lots of troubles with her D7100's, and the D7200's we hear have fixed those but weren't real 'upgrades'. We did step from those to the D750's which I personally love and the camera is more capable then I am of course. My girlfriend however practically lost her shit when she added a 3rd camera and made it a D850. The leap in features and capabilities (low-light, focus points, etc) was apparently 'game changing'. She won't go back down to a D750 again if we need to buy a new one replace one (which we might have to unfortunately now). She's D850 and up going forward. It's apparently WELL worth step up in price if you're looking for a camera.
Link Posted: 12/3/2018 1:38:20 AM EST
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