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Posted: 4/30/2015 8:59:03 PM EDT
I have some pink salt cure, and I want to make smoked pork chops.

I want them to come out like smoky, bacony, ham chops.  I'm doing a half dozen 2 inch thick chops.

How much pink salt do I use in the brine?
Link Posted: 4/30/2015 8:59:54 PM EDT
Just use the same amount as you would rock salt.

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Link Posted: 4/30/2015 9:00:37 PM EDT
Don't know, but check out Survival Forum, lot's of knowledge there .
Link Posted: 4/30/2015 9:27:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/30/2015 9:39:05 PM EDT by Squatch]
Originally Posted By Cincinnatus:
I have some pink salt cure, and I want to make smoked pork chops.

I want them to come out like smoky, bacony, ham chops.  I'm doing a half dozen 2 inch thick chops.

How much pink salt do I use in the brine?
View Quote


2.5% of total weight, turning frequently in a sealed bag.

That's 2.5% total salt...which includes table salt and curing salts.

ETA...it's called an "equilibrium cure" and ensures your meat doesn't turn into a salt lick.

Link Posted: 4/30/2015 9:34:05 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/30/2015 9:41:21 PM EDT
is'nt pink salt KCl, vs reg table salt being NaCl?  Or does pink salt have N's in it?
Link Posted: 4/30/2015 9:45:45 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Gripy:
is'nt pink salt KCl, vs reg table salt being NaCl?  Or does pink salt have N's in it?
View Quote


He probably has number 1, sodium nitrite
Link Posted: 4/30/2015 9:48:30 PM EDT
As mentioned earlier 2.5% by weight.  Your cure will need sugar and regular salt.  Kosher, not iodized.

Make certain its #1 and not #2
Link Posted: 4/30/2015 10:04:09 PM EDT
So the 2.5 is proportionate to the meat weight, what about the amount of water?
Link Posted: 5/3/2015 8:34:04 PM EDT
Okay.  I just ate the pork chops.  They were tasty, but not exactly what I wanted.  

These were 12, one inch thick chops (5.9 pounds).   The brine was enough liquid to cover the meat in a pot.

The brine:   Brown sugar, kosher salt, juniper berries, bay leaves, and...  1 and a 1/4 teaspoon of Prague Powder  #1.

They soaked for 4 1/2 hours.   Smoked them for one hour.   Then finished on the grill with a maple glaze.


Not pink and bacony/hammy enough.

So what do I do?  More time in the brine?  Pink Salt in the brine?  ?

?
Link Posted: 5/3/2015 8:47:58 PM EDT
I don't think the cure no. 1 effects flavor.  It's mostly salt with a small amount of sodium nitrite in it.  The sodium nitrite is a bug killer, not a flavor enhancer.  its used to keep bacteria from developing in the meat if the meats temperature is held low enough for bugs to grow for a period of time.  Like smoking sausages for developing smoke flavors, but not necessarily cooking it.
Link Posted: 5/3/2015 8:51:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/3/2015 8:52:05 PM EDT by Cincinnatus]
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Originally Posted By johnh57:
I don't think the cure no. 1 effects flavor.  It's mostly salt with a small amount of sodium nitrite in it.  The sodium nitrite is a bug killer, not a flavor enhancer.  its used to keep bacteria from developing in the meat if the meats temperature is held low enough for bugs to grow for a period of time.  Like smoking sausages for developing smoke flavors, but not necessarily cooking it.
View Quote


I want the meat to be more like ham and less like pork chop; pink with a ham like texture.

My hickory smoke and maple combo will handle the flavor side.  
Link Posted: 5/3/2015 8:57:23 PM EDT
I would think you would need to brine a minimum of 24 hours. Might need more with thick chops.
Link Posted: 5/3/2015 9:01:26 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By mo98:
I would think you would need to brine a minimum of 24 hours. Might need more with thick chops.
View Quote


The pink, smoked pork chop is indeed an elusive creature.  

I've searched the internet and arrived at my recipes and times from seeing what "most" people say.  But they're wrong.

Next weekend, I'm going to have to experiment.

Link Posted: 5/3/2015 9:04:25 PM EDT
I've never done a ham, but the recipe for dry cured virginia ham calls for 1-1/2 days per lb.  So maybe more time in the brine is correct.

dry cure Virginia Ham
Link Posted: 5/3/2015 9:06:41 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By johnh57:
I've never done a ham, but the recipe for dry cured virginia ham calls for 1-1/2 days per lb.  So maybe more time in the brine is correct.

dry cure Virginia Ham
View Quote



Ham I get.  It's the pork chop thing I'm struggling with.
Link Posted: 5/4/2015 6:37:15 AM EDT
bump...
Link Posted: 5/4/2015 6:45:28 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cincinnatus:
Okay.  I just ate the pork chops.  They were tasty, but not exactly what I wanted.  

These were 12, one inch thick chops (5.9 pounds).   The brine was enough liquid to cover the meat in a pot.

The brine:   Brown sugar, kosher salt, juniper berries, bay leaves, and...  1 and a 1/4 teaspoon of Prague Powder  #1.

They soaked for 4 1/2 hours.   Smoked them for one hour.   Then finished on the grill with a maple glaze.


Not pink and bacony/hammy enough.

So what do I do?  More time in the brine?  Pink Salt in the brine?  ?

?
View Quote



We brine bacon for a week. If you want it to penetrate its going to take some time. 4.5 hours wont be enough if you want it cured like back bacon.
Link Posted: 5/4/2015 6:47:07 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/4/2015 6:47:35 AM EDT by delemorte]
these are the droids you are looking for.


This recipe says 72 hours in the brine. never used this recipe it just seems like its what you are looking for.

http://www.foodiewithfamily.com/homemade-maple-canadian-bacon-smoker-optional/
Link Posted: 5/4/2015 6:50:23 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/4/2015 7:55:32 AM EDT by delemorte]
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Originally Posted By johnh57:
I don't think the cure no. 1 effects flavor.  It's mostly salt with a small amount of sodium nitrite in it.  The sodium nitrite is a bug killer, not a flavor enhancer.  its used to keep bacteria from developing in the meat if the meats temperature is held low enough for bugs to grow for a period of time.  Like smoking sausages for developing smoke flavors, but not necessarily cooking it.
View Quote



Cures do effect texture and flavor. Not as much as smoke or other flavors but if you were to cure a piece of meat with no other flavorents and cook it next to a raw piece of meat the texture and taste are not the same.
Link Posted: 5/4/2015 6:52:47 AM EDT
If you're talking about himylan salt, it has minerals in it making it much less salty. Plus the minerals may impart an off taste to the food.

I got some and don't really use it for those reasons. It's hyped for supplying trace minerals and I'm sure it does but it doesn't taste the same, to me anyway.

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Link Posted: 5/4/2015 7:30:47 AM EDT
I'd brine for several days. When I do hams I use a syringe and inject the brine into the meat.

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Link Posted: 5/4/2015 7:46:55 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/4/2015 7:54:02 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By dog-meat:
I'd brine for several days. When I do hams I use a syringe and inject the brine into the meat.

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this is the one I have, works great:

http://www.amazon.com/Grill-Beast-Stainless-Injector-Professional/dp/B00MNSGWIQ
Link Posted: 5/4/2015 8:09:55 AM EDT
I"ve made the kind of thing you're looking to do.  The #1 cure salt is for a pleasant pink color as well as extending shelf life in the fridge.

I would suggest brining the pork chops at least 2 days with the cure you are using.  I've brined pork loin for a week in a similar cure to achieve the pink "hammy" type look.

With the #1 cure, salt, sugar base cure, I've brined for as long as 10 days.
Link Posted: 5/4/2015 8:26:25 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/4/2015 8:29:23 AM EDT by TxRabbitBane]
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Originally Posted By Cincinnatus:


The pink, smoked pork chop is indeed an elusive creature.  

I've searched the internet and arrived at my recipes and times from seeing what "most" people say.  But they're wrong.

Next weekend, I'm going to have to experiment.

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
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Originally Posted By Cincinnatus:
Originally Posted By mo98:
I would think you would need to brine a minimum of 24 hours. Might need more with thick chops.


The pink, smoked pork chop is indeed an elusive creature.  

I've searched the internet and arrived at my recipes and times from seeing what "most" people say.  But they're wrong.

Next weekend, I'm going to have to experiment.




Hobby charcuterier here.

If work allows I will take this particular challenge and report.

My initial guess is that you need to increase your cure time.  Also, probably some pink salt and some real salt.
Link Posted: 5/4/2015 8:49:22 AM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cincinnatus:
I want the meat to be more like ham and less like pork chop; pink with a ham like texture.



My hickory smoke and maple combo will handle the flavor side.  

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cincinnatus:



Originally Posted By johnh57:

I don't think the cure no. 1 effects flavor.  It's mostly salt with a small amount of sodium nitrite in it.  The sodium nitrite is a bug killer, not a flavor enhancer.  its used to keep bacteria from developing in the meat if the meats temperature is held low enough for bugs to grow for a period of time.  Like smoking sausages for developing smoke flavors, but not necessarily cooking it.




I want the meat to be more like ham and less like pork chop; pink with a ham like texture.



My hickory smoke and maple combo will handle the flavor side.  

you can use a brine made pu of 1 cup salt, one cup sugar and 1 tablespoon pink #1 per gallon to cure meats with a brine.additional flavoring/brown sugar may be added to taste. allow at least 10 days in the brine for 2" thick chops. i went three weeks the last time i did some. you can soak them in clean water for 30 min-2 hours to remove some of the salt.

 
for a dry cure:4% salt cure- for every # meat, combine 18.1 grams pure salt, 6.8 grams or more to taste sugar  and 1.45 grams pink salt #1 and rub over exterior of meat.for 3% cure, reduce salt to 13.6 grams/#. allow 2 days/in thickness of meat+ 1 or more days. this is to allow cure to penetrate meat completely. if you cut to the center of your meat and you have a different  color, it hasn't cured completely. you can leave this cure on for a month and it won't get any saltier. put in plastic bag in refrigerator and turn every day or so. once cured, you can remove excess salt taste by soaking for 1/2-2 hrs. you can add additional seasoning / flavors to cure, instant coffee is kinda nice, as is black pepper, garlic etc.

we've done a couple-three cases of bacon so far this year along with some pork loins/canadian bacon and have gotten excellent results. sanitation is key, along with following directions.

here's a good forum for such shennanigans:











you cab also use mortons tenderquik, but i always thought that was like buying whitebox or rassling a 300 lb walmart greeter.ymmv
Link Posted: 5/4/2015 9:11:34 AM EDT
I cure a pork loin then smoke to make the British style bacon or back bacon. Which is similar to what you are doing minus the bones not being sliced. I cure mine in brown sugar salt and prauge powder (0.5 teaspoon per lb) for 4-5 days. Once the cure is finished I allow to air dry and form a pellicule then smoke for 4 hours. when smoking I use a rub that I would use on the butts I smoke. It comes out fantastic.
Link Posted: 5/4/2015 9:28:28 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/4/2015 11:07:37 AM EDT by mjohn3006]
I cured a pork tenderloin and it came out tasty.

I used 1.6 teaspoon of pink salt on 3 lbs of tenderloin
http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_1_5/1742967_I_m_curing_and_smoking_a_pork_tenderloin__UPDATE_done_and_delecious_.html


Link Posted: 5/4/2015 10:40:10 AM EDT
Brine it longer is what you need to do.

If, after a longer brine, you cannot get the result you are seeking, increase the pink salt a bit, try again.


Or, get "home production of quality meats and sausages" by Stanely Marianski and get reading. That book will tell you how it all works and will give you loads of recipes, if you really want to learn.
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