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Posted: 1/27/2014 5:55:09 AM EDT
So I bought my first house 15 months ago, and everything was fine with the home inspection. House was built in 2007 and is an open concept style house (very few interior walls on first floor)

Recently I have noticed small hairline cracks running along the seams of the drywall on the ceilings both up and down stairs.

Is this a building flaw or something that I should expect as the house settles?

These are new from when I moved in a year ago.

Should I prepare my anus for expensive home repairs or is this normal settling?

Link Posted: 1/27/2014 5:57:34 AM EDT
[#1]
Seems strange it didn't happen before you moved in.

I am of no help though, my house has cracks in every corner, poor old thing must move an inch or more every winter.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 5:58:13 AM EDT
[#2]
cold temps.  
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 5:59:32 AM EDT
[#3]
seams between the sheets of drywall or at corners?






If corners caulk them with acrylic DAP painters caulk and repaint







If cracks between sheets on an open wall you are much more fucked, the wall will need to be stripped down to studs and sheathed with plywood as it should have been a sheer wall to begin with, consult an engineer for specs and nailing patterns

 
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 5:59:38 AM EDT
[#4]
it happens as the house settles.  Hairline cracks can be covered with paint.  Larger cracks need more work..
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:00:17 AM EDT
[#5]
Your house done be shiftin on account of the seasonal changin the be happen'n
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:00:46 AM EDT
[#6]


Quoted:

So I bought my first house 15 months ago, and everything was fine with the home inspection. House was built in 2007 and is an open concept style house (very few interior walls on first floor)



Recently I have noticed small hairline cracks running along the seams of the drywall on the ceilings both up and down stairs.



Is this a building flaw or something that I should expect as the house settles?



These are new from when I moved in a year ago.



Should I prepare my anus for expensive home repairs or is this normal settling?



View Quote


Depends on the area you live in. Here in Texas, foundation issues are fairly common due to the subsurface soil composition. Correcting foundation issues using piers is a thriving industry here.



If this isn't common in your AO, I'd just keep an eye on it and figure it's just normal settling.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:01:04 AM EDT
[#7]
Well I don't think it helps that I have a 100lb dog romping around the place like a demolition derby. They don't appear to be stress cracks as they are straight and appear to be along the seams where they joined the 2 boards of drywall, (I've been under the impression stress fractures pull and crack at an angle) however I'm not sure which is why I'm asking about it.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:01:38 AM EDT
[#8]
This thread is unfortunately relevant to my situation.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:02:03 AM EDT
[#9]
It's west Las Vegas. So temp changes are between 30 and 115
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:02:21 AM EDT
[#10]
If somebody near you began pumping a lot of water from the ground, that can cause settlement too.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:02:29 AM EDT
[#11]
Depends on the area you live in and how the cracks are forming.


Sounds like your house is settling.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:03:13 AM EDT
[#12]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
it happens as the house settles.  Hairline cracks can be covered with paint.  Larger cracks need more work..
View Quote


This is what I was hoping it was. They are very small cracks.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:03:15 AM EDT
[#13]
I have read that they can crack if the installer used too much drywall mud at the joints, but I don't know if that's true.  Also read that drywall seams shouldn't be located at the corner of a door, but they often are.  I have some cracks myself.  I hope it's not a foundation issue.  Most are at doors.  One room has a crack opened all along the crown molding at the ceiling.



 
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:03:31 AM EDT
[#14]
Same problem here.Drywall seams coming apart a little.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:03:40 AM EDT
[#15]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Well I don't think it helps that I have a 100lb dog romping around the place like a demolition derby. They don't appear to be stress cracks as they are straight and appear to be along the seams where they joined the 2 boards of drywall, (I've been under the impression stress fractures pull and crack at an angle) however I'm not sure which is why I'm asking about it.
View Quote


I think it indicates the wall has twisted slightly, and the natural thing for the sheets to do is twist with it, causing the mud on the joints to crack.

Not a drywall guy though, just a humble mason, I do my best right off the bat to make sure your house doesn't move, but they all do, especially up here when its fucking cold half the year and then hot as shit the other half.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:04:17 AM EDT
[#16]
Could be just a shitty tape and mud job.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:05:25 AM EDT
[#17]
Had a similar issue with my last home.  Turns out those seams were never taped, just mudded.  Not a big deal to retape/paint.  I do like the caulk idea though, as I have some happening in my current house as well.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:05:55 AM EDT
[#18]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Could be just a shitty tape and mud job.
View Quote


It's a competitive market, I have seen some real yahoo's slinging joint compound, must have given them a price too good to pass on.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:08:26 AM EDT
[#19]


Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I think it indicates the wall has twisted slightly, and the natural thing for the sheets to do is twist with it, causing the mud on the joints to crack.



Not a drywall guy though, just a humble mason, I do my best right off the bat to make sure your house doesn't move, but they all do, especially up here when its fucking cold half the year and then hot as shit the other half.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Quoted:

Well I don't think it helps that I have a 100lb dog romping around the place like a demolition derby. They don't appear to be stress cracks as they are straight and appear to be along the seams where they joined the 2 boards of drywall, (I've been under the impression stress fractures pull and crack at an angle) however I'm not sure which is why I'm asking about it.




I think it indicates the wall has twisted slightly, and the natural thing for the sheets to do is twist with it, causing the mud on the joints to crack.



Not a drywall guy though, just a humble mason, I do my best right off the bat to make sure your house doesn't move, but they all do, especially up here when its fucking cold half the year and then hot as shit the other half.


Thermal expansion and contraction of the drywall sheets is a viable possibility now that we know the area the OP lives in. That would tend to evenly stress the mud joints and cause them to crack along the joint lines.



Makes me wonder if the trim molding is separating at the joints too. Drywall and wood trim would have different thermal expansion characteristics.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:09:12 AM EDT
[#20]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
It's a competitive market, I have seen some real yahoo's slinging joint compound, must have given them a price too good to pass on.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Quoted:

Could be just a shitty tape and mud job.




It's a competitive market, I have seen some real yahoo's slinging joint compound, must have given them a price too good to pass on.
If I recall there are three different types of mud compounds to be used, I did my garage a couple years ago and I have CRS disease but there is a joint, filling and finish compound.  To cold to go to my shop and look at the old leftover buckets.



Shoddy (lowest bidder) usually do everything with one compound.



 
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:11:29 AM EDT
[#21]
My house is developing cracks all over this winter due to the very cold temperatures.  Changes between hot and cold will expand and contract all the materials in a house.  The colder it gets the more things contract.  I've lived in my 100 year old house for 12 years and this winter has been worse on the house compared to all the others I've seen.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:13:23 AM EDT
[#22]
One, your house lacks structural support with few interior walls (unless it's a dome type)..

Square type homes flex with wind and tempature.

I'm not saying your house will fall down, it won't, but you'll just have to get used to those craks and interior fill and paint will be as common as pulling weeds in your yard.


The previous owner most likely did this right before the sale.

My house is a 40 year old single story 3 bed 2 bath 1100sq foot home with lots of interior walls.

I never see cracks, and the workmanship was probably better in the 60's
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:17:29 AM EDT
[#23]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Could be just a shitty tape and mud job.
View Quote

I'm going with this.  Usually takes a while to rear it's ugly head.  

Post pics if possible.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:17:39 AM EDT
[#24]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Could be just a shitty tape and mud job.
View Quote


I'm going to go with this.  I have them in the ceiling in the garage, and you can see the difference in quality between that and inside the house.  But since it's in the garage, I haven't even bothered to do anything about it.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:18:50 AM EDT
[#25]
Ive built alot of homes.
The cracks are normal as the house settles/temp changes
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:19:32 AM EDT
[#26]
My garage drywall looks better then the house, but then I did it and used 5/8" drywall.



ETA: I also shimmed and shaved the 2x4s before sheeting.  Very few drywall guys do that anymore except for the top shelf home builders.



 
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:31:47 AM EDT
[#27]
Meh, houses settle a little after construction and thermal expansion & contraction creates those little cracks you refer to.  Not necessarily a big deal if they don't continue to open up.  Most silicone caulks these days are paintable, so fill the cracks with a flexible material like that, trowel down & sand smooth, then reapply paint.  It's fixed!  

I did this to a crack in the ceiling of my living room about 5 years ago and the crack has never reappeared.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:33:04 AM EDT
[#28]
My townhouse is brand new, moved in two years ago after it was finished being built and I have the same thing. The house constantly creeks and stuff. I'm convinced the builders are just cheap but it is what it is.

Also your icon freaked me out because I though "Man did I get drunk and ask this question last night?"
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:33:49 AM EDT
[#29]
Would compacting the soil before setting the foundation help any?

Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:35:26 AM EDT
[#30]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Would compacting the soil before setting the foundation help any?



View Quote
Only if the base soil was fill or imported, hence digging foundations is desirable because it gets into naturally compacted soil.



 
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:37:23 AM EDT
[#31]
I deal with this also. My walls and ceilings are plaster. Caulking/painting last for about two to three years and the cracks show back up again. I found out if I open up the cracks abit almost a inch and then spackle/paint them they haven't come back.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:48:32 AM EDT
[#32]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

I'm going with this.  Usually takes a while to rear it's ugly head.  

Post pics if possible.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Could be just a shitty tape and mud job.

I'm going with this.  Usually takes a while to rear it's ugly head.  

Post pics if possible.


I can't do pics now, my phone is my only camera and I have no cell service where I live. The house was built right at the beginning of the housing boom here so the lack of tape is a real possibility.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:50:14 AM EDT
[#33]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
My townhouse is brand new, moved in two years ago after it was finished being built and I have the same thing. The house constantly creeks and stuff. I'm convinced the builders are just cheap but it is what it is.

Also your icon freaked me out because I though "Man did I get drunk and ask this question last night?"
View Quote


Lol. I didn't know anyone else had this avatar. Time to change it I spose.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:50:38 AM EDT
[#34]
Catastrophic global climate change did this. Al Gore tried to warn us.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:51:38 AM EDT
[#35]
Thx for the responses all. I was thinking it was settling, you all secured that thought for me. Time to seal em up and paint.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:53:46 AM EDT
[#36]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Would compacting the soil before setting the foundation help any?

View Quote


Doubt it, the soil here is like concrete. It's why very few houses have basements here, they are a bitch to dig and not cost effective.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 6:57:06 AM EDT
[#37]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Would compacting the soil before setting the foundation help any?



View Quote


foundations should be placed on undisturbed soil.



 
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 7:00:55 AM EDT
[#38]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
 Turns out those seams were never taped, just mudded.
View Quote

I've seen this more than a couple times.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 7:01:44 AM EDT
[#39]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Thx for the responses all. I was thinking it was settling, you all secured that thought for me. Time to seal em up and paint.
View Quote


Could be season changes in soil humidity causing floating and movement, especially in an open concept building, combined with a crappy tape and mud job.



Or you might have added enough weight over the years to cause enough deflection to pop the seams.
 
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 7:02:49 AM EDT
[#40]
Cold weather.
Fast taping job.
It happens.
Worry about in a few years when you repaint the room.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 7:03:11 AM EDT
[#41]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

foundations should be placed on undisturbed soil.
 
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Would compacting the soil before setting the foundation help any?


foundations should be placed on undisturbed soil.
 


Maybe that's why they settle and crack.

A jumping jack soil compactor is commonly used to compact soils where commercial buildings and roads will be built.



Adds to the cost, but prevents settling of the foundation or uneveness in the road over time.

Link Posted: 1/27/2014 7:39:08 AM EDT
[#42]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Would compacting the soil before setting the foundation help any?

View Quote


You have to build on virgin soil, if the excavator over digs that means ordering more concrete for the footer.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 7:43:47 AM EDT
[#43]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Maybe that's why they settle and crack.



A jumping jack soil compactor is commonly used to compact soils where commercial buildings and roads will be built.



http://www.taylorrental.com/images/products/jumpingjack.jpg



Adds to the cost, but prevents settling of the foundation or uneveness in the road over time.



View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Quoted:


Quoted:

Would compacting the soil before setting the foundation help any?





foundations should be placed on undisturbed soil.

 




Maybe that's why they settle and crack.



A jumping jack soil compactor is commonly used to compact soils where commercial buildings and roads will be built.



http://www.taylorrental.com/images/products/jumpingjack.jpg



Adds to the cost, but prevents settling of the foundation or uneveness in the road over time.





there is a difference between using compacted fill for slabs and using it for foundations/footers.



 
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 7:47:24 AM EDT
[#44]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
seams between the sheets of drywall or at corners?

If corners caulk them with acrylic DAP painters caulk and repaint

If cracks between sheets on an open wall you are much more fucked, the wall will need to be stripped down to studs and sheathed with plywood as it should have been a sheer wall to begin with, consult an engineer for specs and nailing patterns
 
View Quote


If it's open concept then maybe the walls are large enough they should have had control joints like they use in large commercial building walls.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 7:51:47 AM EDT
[#45]
Quoted:
So I bought my first house 15 months ago, and everything was fine with the home inspection. House was built in 2007 and is an open concept style house (very few interior walls on first floor)

Recently I have noticed small hairline cracks running along the seams of the drywall on the ceilings both up and down stairs.

Is this a building flaw or something that I should expect as the house settles?

These are new from when I moved in a year ago.

Should I prepare my anus for expensive home repairs or is this normal settling?

View Quote


Yet another situation where knowing someone's general location is really important.

But, by all means, continue being paranoid. Everyone......and I mean everyone, is out to get you. So stay on your toes, be safe. You should carry....like....5 gunz, 'cause bitchez be cray-cray yo.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 7:53:23 AM EDT
[#46]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:




This thread is unfortunately relevant to my situation.
View Quote


Same.







 
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:00:14 AM EDT
[#47]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Could be just a shitty tape and mud job.
View Quote


Agreed.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:01:51 AM EDT
[#48]
I wouldn't worry about hairline cracks in drywall. Our house is 10 years old and
full of them in some places. I have found from experience that mesh joint tape is much more

prone to seams cracking than paper tape. Contractors love the mesh tape because it is so

much quicker than using paper joint tape. It is like using PEX to plumb a house, it isn't better than

other more traditional methods, just quicker and cheaper to build with.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:03:49 AM EDT
[#49]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
seams between the sheets of drywall or at corners?

If corners caulk them with acrylic DAP painters caulk and repaint

If cracks between sheets on an open wall you are much more fucked, the wall will need to be stripped down to studs and sheathed with plywood as it should have been a sheer wall to begin with, consult an engineer for specs and nailing patterns
 
View Quote

HAHAH no...
No offense man but,that is not even remotely correct.. All you need to do is have a finisher re-run the joints. Bang the wall with you fist and see if it rattles. If it does rattle put a few nails in it to anchor it back solid then spot the nails and put stick on tape over the cracks and run the joints. (3rd gen drywall hanger/finisher here)
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:05:12 AM EDT
[#50]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:





HAHAH no...

No offense man but,that is not even remotely correct.. All you need to do is have a finisher re-run the joints. Bang the wall with you fist and see if it rattles. If it does rattle put a few nails in it to anchor it back solid then spot the nails and put stick on tape over the cracks and run the joints. (3rd gen drywall hanger/finisher here)
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Quoted:

seams between the sheets of drywall or at corners?



If corners caulk them with acrylic DAP painters caulk and repaint



If cracks between sheets on an open wall you are much more fucked, the wall will need to be stripped down to studs and sheathed with plywood as it should have been a sheer wall to begin with, consult an engineer for specs and nailing patterns

 


HAHAH no...

No offense man but,that is not even remotely correct.. All you need to do is have a finisher re-run the joints. Bang the wall with you fist and see if it rattles. If it does rattle put a few nails in it to anchor it back solid then spot the nails and put stick on tape over the cracks and run the joints. (3rd gen drywall hanger/finisher here)
I like screws, nails not so much.



 
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