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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/29/2005 4:14:53 AM EDT
Conditions Primitive in Texas After Rita

By PAM EASTON, Associated Press Writer
31 minutes ago

WOODVILLE, Texas - Five days after Hurricane Rita came ashore, conditions remained primitive in parts of Texas, where some residents were taking baths and brushing their teeth using water from the Neches River and others were sleeping in tents.

The plywood sign outside the home in East Texas where eight Beaumont families had sought refuge from Hurricane Rita carried a simple message: "Help Needed. Ice and Water. 43 People."

The evacuees had no electricity and little water or food after the storm. As temperatures neared triple-digits, adults used paper towels dampened with bottled water to keep children from overheating. A campfire was built to keep mosquitoes away.

"The only thing we could think of to survive was to put out that sign," said Tiffany Moten, 24, who was staying at the home near Livingston. "Luckily, we were blessed, and we have a lot of friendly people who came up and brought us water and ice and things like that. We are trying to make it."

The Federal Emergency Management Agency delivered ice, water and packaged meals Wednesday to residents who rode out the storm, but some officials in hard-hit areas criticized the agency's response, with one calling for a commission to examine the emergency response.

In Houston, FEMA closed a disaster relief center just hours after its doors opened when some of the hundreds of hurricane victims in line began fainting in the heat. FEMA officials said they were caught off-guard by the roughly 1,500 people who showed up, but said it would reopen the center Thursday morning.

Remainder of article

Link to Survival Forum

Link Posted: 9/29/2005 4:50:27 AM EDT

"The only thing we could think of to survive was to put out that sign," said Tiffany Moten, 24, who was staying at the home near Livingston."




Ah. Um. Maybe you could prepare by storing some food and water for such an emergency?

Just a thought . . .





CMOS
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 4:58:47 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 4:59:50 AM EDT
<---- wacko

CMOS
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 5:01:25 AM EDT

The Federal Emergency Management Agency delivered ice, water and packaged meals Wednesday to residents who rode out the storm, but some officials in hard-hit areas criticized the agency's response, with one calling for a commission to examine the emergency response.


What does FEMA have to do in order for people to be happy? Supply a full time butler to each house?
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 5:05:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By CMOS:

"The only thing we could think of to survive was to put out that sign," said Tiffany Moten, 24, who was staying at the home near Livingston."




Ah. Um. Maybe you could prepare by storing some food and water for such an emergency?

Just a thought . . .





CMOS


I believe in the being prepared thing myself, but consider that the average US house only has a total of 2 weeks worth of food in it of ANY type..then consider you have 43 people suddenly living in a house that WAS holding, maybe, 5 or 6, and I could see where any sort of normal supplies would quickly be exhausted.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 5:11:00 AM EDT
How hard is it to have a water filter or iodine tablets? On top of that a couple cases of tuna or vienna sausage would be less than a family trip out to the movies.

Hell I would love a week of primative camping.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 5:12:33 AM EDT
I live up in the affected zone. We have no power, water, or sewer. We are getting along fine. We don't want or need FEMA's help. In fact, I don't want any government help. I haven't gotten in line for any water, food, or ice. I would like for the power company to come and restore power in the area I live in.
FWIW I work 45 miles southwest of where I live, and we never lost power here.

John
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 5:13:25 AM EDT

Originally Posted By tc556guy:

Originally Posted By CMOS:

"The only thing we could think of to survive was to put out that sign," said Tiffany Moten, 24, who was staying at the home near Livingston."




Ah. Um. Maybe you could prepare by storing some food and water for such an emergency?

Just a thought . . .





CMOS


I believe in the being prepared thing myself, but consider that the average US house only has a total of 2 weeks worth of food in it of ANY type..then consider you have 43 people suddenly living in a house that WAS holding, maybe, 5 or 6, and I could see where any sort of normal supplies would quickly be exhausted.





Agreed. - That means if EVERY household made that 2-week preparation there wouldn't be a shortage. Pretty simple.


Once again - total lack of personal responsibility.


CMOS
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