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Posted: 4/18/2007 4:10:55 PM EDT
For those of you who have taken the course (any state), do you feel like it was in-depth enough or needing improvement? Just pondering on the fact that LEOs spend a lot more in training, learning how to have a certain mindset concerning carrying a weapon, when to draw, when not to draw, etc. Would a day or two really be enough to sufficiently train someone on that? Does the course even really cover this point?

I ask because after the past 48 hours, I've heavily reconsidered it. I wonder if I could really trust myself not to change my attitude or to have the correct attitude. I be no means a violent person, but don't ever want to make a bad mistake in drawing a weapon when it was not necessary.

What have been your experiences in dealing with situations while armed and the individual(s) was unaware? Thanks guys for your time and opinions.
Link Posted: 4/18/2007 4:17:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By memyselfandi:
Just pondering on the fact that LEOs spend a lot more in training, learning how to have a certain mindset concerning carrying a weapon, when to draw, when not to draw, etc.


Are you joking? Or smoking crack?

I'm not dogging the LEO folks. But look at your "average" LEO. They write tickets, respond to the loud party calls. Yes, some are pretty darn good with a gun. But many can't even strip their own weapons.

Forgive me if i'm generalizing. But would have to say the average "gun guy" probably trains just as much, if not more, than the majority of LEO's.

No disrespect intended.

Link Posted: 4/18/2007 4:19:42 PM EDT
Well I'm not referring to their everyday shooting skill, field stripping skill, or nunchuck skill. I'm talking about mindset of when to draw when not to draw and the attitude of carrying a gun. See the difference? Some may only be patrol officers that right tickets, but they remember their training just like a soldier from Vietnam would.

And Im not an 'average gun guy'. I dont train for stuff like that. Theres no where around here for me to do that without lots of $$$. Im simply a gun enthusiast.
Link Posted: 4/18/2007 4:20:42 PM EDT
In my opinion CCW training in KY is very preliminary. You should try to get all of the additional training you can.

And practice shooting frequently.
Link Posted: 4/18/2007 4:23:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By KyBlaster:
In my opinion CCW training in KY is very preliminary. You should try to get all of the additional training you can.

And practice shooting frequently.


+1

The best part about doing additional training is that it's fun! Treat it as useful recreation.
Link Posted: 4/18/2007 4:26:07 PM EDT
Well I have a CCP and I still want more training.
Is the training lacking? well yes but Rome was not bulit in a day.
Taking the CCP class is not an end to training. It is just another step on the stair to higher training.
Link Posted: 4/18/2007 5:21:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/18/2007 5:23:07 PM EDT by Stryfe]

Originally Posted By Ripak:
Well I have a CCP and I still want more training.
Is the training lacking? well yes but Rome was not bulit in a day.
Taking the CCP class is not an end to training. It is just another step on the stair to higher training.

+1.
It's like anything else, you get what you pay for.
You can probably find a number of classes, and instructors, that meet the necessary guidlelines for what your states requirements. But some are going to be better than others. Some are going to cost more. Some are going to be longer.

I got lucky, I took a course because it was convenient, but the instructors had a lot of training, and were very knowledgeable on the subject. But I didn't really research the matter, I just took the quickest course I could get in.

On the other hand, my Dad took a different course from a different set of instructors. I talked to him about his course before taking mine, so I had an idea what to expect and how to prepare. I feel I got a lot more out of the course I took, than the one he did.

The upside, is that you can always take more classes. And practice at home.
Link Posted: 4/18/2007 7:38:26 PM EDT
Pardon me, but one of my shooting buddies is a LEO that teaches those courses, as well as his department.

I'll just say he has learned a lot from me over the years. I've been involved with firearms a very long time.

And I think I have enough inate intelligence to know when I need to draw, when to shoot, and who to shoot however many times.
Link Posted: 4/18/2007 7:45:56 PM EDT
Ohio requires a 12 hour CCW class -- 10 hours of "book learning" and two hours of range time -- when you apply for you CCW.

Out of 15 students in my class, I would say 3 or 4 had never fired a handgun.

I've taken a couple of "big name" pistol/defensive classes and make a trip to the range at least twice a month.

If you carry, ya gotta practice . . .
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