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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 2/8/2006 8:09:06 PM EDT
I just had to reformat my harddrive (my, how much faster it runs without virii and spyware!) and I want to make a DVD with an image of my hard drive as it is now.

I want to be able to just stick a DVD and restore my system to its current state from a complete format.

How do I do this?

I have a plextor px-716a. Currently running Windows XP pro. 512 mb ram, AMD 2600+ blah blah...

Any help would be appreciated.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 8:23:39 PM EDT
I would recommend Norton Ghost for this. You should be able to make the DVD bootable, and away you go!!
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 8:26:43 PM EDT
Acronis True Image

www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/trueimage/


2 disks.... 1 recovery disk you boot with and choose recover, the other disk (cd or DVD) has all the data (a copy of the HDD) 10-15 minutes from start your done and running again. No need to reinstall programs, or cd/reg keys.....
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 8:37:47 PM EDT
Thanks for the tips guys.

BTW, NEVER EVER EVER EVER disable the RPC service in Windows XP.
Link Posted: 2/8/2006 8:39:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
Thanks for the tips guys.

BTW, NEVER EVER EVER EVER disable the RPC service in Windows XP.



[nelson]HA HA!!![/nelson]
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 9:48:39 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
I just had to reformat my harddrive (my, how much faster it runs without virii and spyware!) and I want to make a DVD with an image of my hard drive as it is now.




Since now you have a new, clean system, why don't you keep it that way and stop surfing the web an an Administrator account? If you had been using a User/Limited account you never would've gotten infected in the first place.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 9:50:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By JavaMan:

Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
I just had to reformat my harddrive (my, how much faster it runs without virii and spyware!) and I want to make a DVD with an image of my hard drive as it is now.




Since now you have a new, clean system, why don't you keep it that way and stop surfing the web an an Administrator account? If you had been using a User/Limited account you never would've gotten infected in the first place.



Never is a strong term.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 2:45:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JavaMan:
Since now you have a new, clean system, why don't you keep it that way and stop surfing the web an an Administrator account? If you had been using a User/Limited account you never would've gotten infected in the first place.


---There was a editorial linked to on numerous tech sites a few days ago that pointed out that "not regularly using an admin account" is really a false sense of security in a way.

The reasoning that's always been given for this is that when you use a limited account, only your own personal files are at risk--but the problem here is that the only files you really care about are your personal files. A limited-user account on an OS that lets them get wiped out but protects the core OS files doesn't really do the typical user any good.

The general conclusion was that if you could choose between running protected user accounts and insecure programs, or unprotected user accounts and secure programs, you are really better off with the latter.
~
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 2:50:54 PM EDT
What are virii?

Macintosh Powerbook G4 user.

Link Posted: 2/9/2006 3:21:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/9/2006 3:21:48 PM EDT by Floppy_833]
Virii for Macs are special programs that are "currently in development"--just like OSx86.
~
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 3:25:37 PM EDT
Using a limited/guest account you can an will still get viri/spyware. Not as much no, but you will still get it....
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 3:48:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Floppy_833:

Originally Posted By JavaMan:
Since now you have a new, clean system, why don't you keep it that way and stop surfing the web an an Administrator account? If you had been using a User/Limited account you never would've gotten infected in the first place.


---There was a editorial linked to on numerous tech sites a few days ago that pointed out that "not regularly using an admin account" is really a false sense of security in a way.

The reasoning that's always been given for this is that when you use a limited account, only your own personal files are at risk--but the problem here is that the only files you really care about are your personal files. A limited-user account on an OS that lets them get wiped out but protects the core OS files doesn't really do the typical user any good.

The general conclusion was that if you could choose between running protected user accounts and insecure programs, or unprotected user accounts and secure programs, you are really better off with the latter.
~




1. Good backups
2. Limited rights
3. Turn off unneeded services
4. Review logfiles
5. Smart computing practices
6. antivirus/spyware for the windows users

Great plan, so it's better for the entire machine to be compromised than just a few files? The very thing that makes unix/linux/mac operating systems secure is file permissions and the inability of programs to compromise the operating system.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 4:39:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Floppy_833:
---There was a editorial linked to on numerous tech sites a few days ago that pointed out that "not regularly using an admin account" is really a false sense of security in a way.




You gotta link? It's obvious that you don't understand the issues involved and I need to see exactly what you're talking about to make sense of it.


The reasoning that's always been given for this is that when you use a limited account, only your own personal files are at risk--but the problem here is that the only files you really care about are your personal files. A limited-user account on an OS that lets them get wiped out but protects the core OS files doesn't really do the typical user any good.



No, the reasoning is Windows will not let anything - no virus, no trojan, no spyware, no browser helper objects, no Active-X plugins, not even a new font - install under a User (XP Pro) or Limited (XP Home) account. And if they can't install, you can't get infected.


The general conclusion was that if you could choose between running protected user accounts and insecure programs, or unprotected user accounts and secure programs, you are really better off with the latter. ~


What are these "insecure programs" you're talking about? Got any names or details on how they're "insecure?" Yes, there are some programs, like Nero Burning ROM, that have to run as an Admin. In that case all you have to do is right-click on the icon, select "Run-as.." and give an Admin login. And that program ONLY will run as an Admin, leaving all other processes to run under the protected account.

There is absolutely no reason internet-related programs like IE, Outlook, Mozilla, etc., need to run under an Admin account to work properly. But by doing so you leave yourself wide open for all sorts of malware to install itself. OTOH, by surfing under a Limited account, you block all these nasties from successfully installing no matter how may popups you click "Yes" to or how many picture attachments named "BrittneySpearsNaked.jpg.exe" you double-click on.
Link Posted: 2/9/2006 5:49:54 PM EDT
Thanks Nick Burns. I'm not a computer tech expert. I don't normally run on an admin account and the only insecure software I'm running is Windows XP.
Link Posted: 2/10/2006 12:59:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By nightstalker:
What are virii?

Macintosh Powerbook G4 user.



+1

Knoppix bootable CD ("LiveCD") user.
www.knoppix.net/
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