Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 7/2/2003 7:22:51 AM EDT
I'm stupid, so please bare with me... So when I bought my computer, the model I chose came with 256MB of RDRAM (PC800). I want to upgrade to at least double that. So in looking at prices, I'm discovering that I might be an idiot for originally getting the RDRAM since its still so much more expensive then the DDR. So, is RDRAM really any better than DDR? If so, how? Or am I screwed? Here's the way I look at it, I could get more than double the DDR per dollar vs RDRAM. So, stupid question, is their a possibility that my motherboard supports RDRAM and DDR, so I could get rid of what I have and start over with a big chunk of DDR? If not, and I have to stick to RDRAM, will this stuff ever go down in price? Do I have to make sure it's compatible with my current stuff (same PC800, whatever the hell that means). And for future reference, what important numbers/feature do you look at when buying RAM? What the hell does the PC### mean? My lesson has been learned, next time I get a new computer, I'm going to try to build it myself after a lot of research and a lot of guidance from people that know what the hell they're doing....
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 7:49:32 AM EDT
PC XXX is the speed in Megaherts of the memory, so the higher, the better (to keep up with the processor) I don't think you can mix different types of memory, but if you can, it will work using the lowest common speed. If your motherboards supports it, you can stuff it with "cheap" memory, and you'll be able to do what more memory allows you to do (no using the HD for swapping), but the performance will suffer, as it will not be as fast as it could go. Now, note there's e big IF in here, as I don't remember if the laters processors can use DDR NsB
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 7:51:33 AM EDT
If you have RDRAM, you're stuck with using it on that motherboard. Intel tried to push this stuff, but all the AMD boards went with DDR. Then people started making Intel boards with DDR and RDRAM became an artifact. I suppose it will drop in price some; that's how memory usually goes. It's a shrinking market, though, so it won't drop as fast as DDR. For now, I would just get the RDRAM and keep your current motherboard. [url=www.pricewatch.com]Pricewatch[/url] says it's $50 / 256 MB vs $25 for DDR, but that's still not much money. You'll want RAM at least as fast as you have now (PC800). If you decide to get a module greater than 256 MB, make sure your motherboard can support it. PCXXX started as a reasonable way of indicating memory speed for SDRAM. PC66 ran at 66 MHz, PC133 ran at 133 MHz, etc. DDR & RDRAM changed that: PC800 RDRAM, for example, runs at a 400MHz clock but transfers data twice/cycle leading to an effective speed of 800MHz. At 2 bytes/cycle (the data path width), that's 1600 MB/s. Take DDR200 (PC1600). It runs at 100 MHz but also transfers twice per cycle ==> 200 MHz. It has an 8 byte data path, so it also has a transfer speed of 1600 MB/s. More confused yet?
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 8:18:12 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/2/2003 8:25:09 AM EDT by HKocher]
Originally Posted By fizassist: More confused yet?
View Quote
Yes and no. [;)] The first half of your post answered my question perfect. But I did get a bit confused with the PCXXX explanation, but I suppose it is a moot point, since I'm stuck with RDRAM for now. So is it fair to say, that the cheaper DDR that is greater than PC1600, are better than the PC800 RDRAM that I will pay more for? So why would anyone choose PC1600, when I see PC3500 for about the same price? Is it simply a matter of buying what you are currently using? I'd love to be able to someday build a kick ass machine, but it seems hard to keep up with the technology and the market. If you build your own machine, is it possible to better configure it so that you can upgrade more easily. Or is it better to start from scratch each time your computer becomes a dinosaur? Another thing, I'm such a pack rat when it comes to anything, so my HD is always running near the max capacity. I could probably benefit a lot performance wise from deleting a bunch of stuff, but I can never bring myself to do it. Oh, and my backup HD is full, so that is no longer an option. Thanks for the help!
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 8:18:47 AM EDT
And, Don't forget, RDRAM must be installed in pairs. So if you want to increase by 256M, you will need two 128M modules.
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 8:21:00 AM EDT
Originally Posted By XM777: And, Don't forget, RDRAM must be installed in pairs. So if you want to increase by 256M, you will need two 128M modules.
View Quote
Only if you have DUAL CHANNEL RDRAM. Gets complicated, huh?
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 8:25:40 AM EDT
I think i have two 128 sticks of viking rdram. The sticks are unopened in the original box. I can let you have them for 40 $ plus shipping
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 8:27:54 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Matthew_Q:
Originally Posted By XM777: And, Don't forget, RDRAM must be installed in pairs. So if you want to increase by 256M, you will need two 128M modules.
View Quote
Only if you have DUAL CHANNEL RDRAM. Gets complicated, huh?
View Quote
Aw crap! How can I tell? I had always read that RDRAM must be installed in pairs. You mean that is not always the case???
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 8:30:29 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Matthew_Q:
Originally Posted By XM777: And, Don't forget, RDRAM must be installed in pairs. So if you want to increase by 256M, you will need two 128M modules.
View Quote
Only if you have DUAL CHANNEL RDRAM. Gets complicated, huh?
View Quote
You have it backwards. Dual Channel (32-bit) RIMMs can be installed in singles. Single Channel (16-bit) RIMMs like HKocher's PC800's MUST be installed in pairs.
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 8:31:35 AM EDT
Originally Posted By HKocher:
Originally Posted By Matthew_Q:
Originally Posted By XM777: And, Don't forget, RDRAM must be installed in pairs. So if you want to increase by 256M, you will need two 128M modules.
View Quote
Only if you have DUAL CHANNEL RDRAM. Gets complicated, huh?
View Quote
Aw crap! How can I tell? I had always read that RDRAM must be installed in pairs. You mean that is not always the case???
View Quote
How many slots are on your motherboard? 2? Then it's single channel. 4? Then it's Dual Channel. If it's single channel, you can mix SIZE. I.E. one 128MB and one 256MB. SOME chipsets will let you mix speeds, but to be on the safe side, use the same speed. If it's dual channel, you need to run pairs. What's in the first slot has to match what's in the second. Then what's in the third has to match what's in the fourth. But the first and third don't have to match. Get it? you could do 128 128 128 128 or 128 128 256 256
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 8:37:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/2/2003 8:37:37 AM EDT by HKocher]
I get it. I'll open the case when I get home, I'm not sure. So in either case, I should get probably opt for the largest chunk of RAM I can afford, since after this, all my slots will be full.
Link Posted: 7/2/2003 8:43:28 AM EDT
For the Record, I'm pretty sure the Pentium Spec Bus speeds are actually quad not double. Meaning 800 mhz is actually 200x4. DDR is double. So 400 mhz speed is actually 200x2. From this leads into the processor wars. Amd claims the DDR is a slower bus speed, but it's more "efficent", I.E, less bigger bigger pipes then having more smaller pipes.
Top Top