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Posted: 1/8/2006 4:30:24 AM EDT
I live where there is not DSL ( and no future chance)and my only option is Direcway satellite service. I want to have it installed and split it with the neighbor via a wireless router. It is 550 foot to his house with no obstacles. It is around $70 per month with taxes and crap.

Ya I know this probably is not the correct thing to do but WTF. Is this possible and reliable. We live in a very, and I mean very rural area and no reasonable chance of people sharing our hopefully secure network.

Chime in.

Where to get long range routers?
Price to set this network up.
Anything else needed to set this up?
Can I do this myself being a novice.?


Thanks in advance.


Bob
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 4:51:51 AM EDT
Cat 5 cable is good to 1,000 ft.

Just hardwire a peer to peer setup, or install a switch/router and network the 2 houses.
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 5:18:08 AM EDT
Check out the new kid on the block as far as Satellite Internet is concerned Wild Blue

Once, you have the ip traffic at either house you can do a couple of things.
1. Run your satellite modem into a Router and run Cat5e to the other house
2. Run your satellite modem into a wireless router and have a microwave link to the other house

How many computers are you going to have at each site? If you have multiple computers at each site, you can run the satellite modem into a router at the primary site and then cat5/microwave link the other site and run that into a router and split it off from there.
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 12:17:07 PM EDT
Thanks for the info. What would the microwave link cost for the setup? Wildblue seems like the value. I am spoiled the wifi at work goes at 54MBS. I have 25bps at home and this sucks. Thanks again guys.


Bob
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 2:05:57 PM EDT
I'd like to do this also.
tag
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 2:15:36 PM EDT
Why do you say no chance for DSL? There are new technologies being fielded such as extended range DSL. There are also wireless networks based on relay hops between subscribers. I'd do a little more research like calling ISP's in local cities before I gave up.
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 2:21:02 PM EDT
My ISP used to provide a wireless service. They mounted a 24 dB gain directional antenna on my roof shooting line of sight (no trees) about 1000 ft and had a full signal. I have no idea how much it costs...

http://www.radiolabs.com/products/antennas/2.4gig/2.4-aluminum-parabolic.php
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 2:35:33 PM EDT
Actually, Just get a couple of Yagi Antaneas and a wi-fi repeater that will act as a receiver on your friends end (two routers have a hard time talking to each other).

Check out what they folks offer, they are very inexpensive.

www.engeniustech.com/
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 2:38:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ar-wrench:
Cat 5 cable is good to 1,000 ft.

Just hardwire a peer to peer setup, or install a switch/router and network the 2 houses.



I'd like to see a 1,000 foot ethernet run that worked.
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 2:39:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/8/2006 2:40:34 PM EDT by SWIRE]
You should be able to get a connection using a combination of standard Wireless G router/access points I setup a wireless link to my neighbors which I would guess to be about 500ft away. I'm on one end of a city block and they are on the other. We had to go up to our second floors to get line of site and then we each setup a wireless access point in the windows facing each other. there was a solid connection between the two. Of course we both had DSL and were just doing it to see if it was possible and it was. I was able to transfer a couple hundred Gigs of data using it with no problem.

What we were using were the Dell TrueMobile 2300 Wireless Router setup in access point mode and then tied into each of our networks with a standard network cable. At the time they were going for about $70 on eBay but now you can find them for under $20! It would definately be much cheaper to try that first and see if it works. If it doesn't you still get a good wireless router for your house for $20!
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 2:48:33 PM EDT
First, know that using a hawking amplifier in conjunction with any high gain antenna will be in violation of FCC EIRP regs. Basically the FCC says nothing more than 4 W EIRP (Effective Isotropic Radiated Power).

Antennas

Here is a good source for cheap effective antennas. If you have your range extender/bridge in an ammo can, everything will be waterproof and you will minimize any coax runs.
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 2:51:10 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 2:55:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ar-wrench:
Cat 5 cable is good to 1,000 ft.

Just hardwire a peer to peer setup, or install a switch/router and network the 2 houses.



Wrong --330 ft is the max for cat 5 (100 yards)

Take a look at the Linksys wireless units. They will also double as a point to point bridge. 2 of these (1 at each end) with range boosters and larger antennas and it should work.
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 3:05:38 PM EDT

Originally Posted By odontia32m:
I live where there is not DSL ( and no future chance)and my only option is Direcway satellite service. I want to have it installed and split it with the neighbor via a wireless router. It is 550 foot to his house with no obstacles. It is around $70 per month with taxes and crap.

[snip]


Bob



You never know where they'll put DSL...our cabin 50 miles north of Boise (boonies) has it.

Somewhat off-topic: If you have plans on using a VPN with Direcway, you may have some more homework in front of you. One of the best resources for Direcway is Direcway Uncensored. Before DSL hit the wilderness we were also considering Direcway and this site was well worth the small cost for info beyond the free stuff.
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 3:10:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ar-wrench:
Cat 5 cable is good to 1,000 ft.

Just hardwire a peer to peer setup, or install a switch/router and network the 2 houses.



Sorry dude, but that's wrong. Cat 5e is only good to 100 meters. Aprox 300 feet, without the use of some sort of repeater.
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 12:08:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Arlis:
Why do you say no chance for DSL? There are new technologies being fielded such as extended range DSL. There are also wireless networks based on relay hops between subscribers. I'd do a little more research like calling ISP's in local cities before I gave up.



Not possible, have been trying. We have wireless DSL here but I am out of range. They came out with a boom truch and an antenna and got no signal. My only and last option besides dialup is satellite.


Bob
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 2:13:28 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/20/2006 2:14:05 PM EDT by JB69]
Considering every satellite ISP setup I've seen requires you to have a phone line hooked up to the system, for uplink, How well will this work ? The dish itself is only for the downlink, after all.

I mean every time your neighbor wants to get online, YOUR phoneline will be tied up, as well, unless you get a 2nd dedicated line just for the internet.

Either way, in case you weren't aware of that, it's something to think about.


ETA: I do see though, that Wild Blue (link posted above) doesn't require a phone line. That may be your best option. I wasn't aware that there are two-way satellite systems out there yet.
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 2:50:04 PM EDT
Use a repeater in the middle OR
Get a pair of fiberoptic media converters and run a line between the houses. Older 10 Megabit is okay, lots of inexpensive ones can be found on eBay. Fiber is the most reliable and secure way to do this.
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 3:36:41 PM EDT
Dig a trench and run pvc with fiber.
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 4:00:28 PM EDT
Wireless router (802.11b/g/whatever) at the end with the dish, wireless networking card at the other end, 550 feet is nothing if it's an unobstructed path. You do NOT need "range extenders" or such nonsense for this kind of distance. You will probably need a couple of decent performance antennas, you can even make your own out of tin cans (the instructions are out there, and they work). Keep the coax cable length as short as possible to minimize loss to the antennas.
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 4:58:48 PM EDT
Neither Wild Blue (which I have) , Direc Way NOR StarBand require a telephone uplink.
They all are full duplex sat rigs.
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 5:01:15 PM EDT
This is something I'm considering as well. We can't get DSL or cable internet here, and we're down behind some hills so there's very short line-of-sight in any direction. We have dial-up, usually at 21kbps, but sometimes up to 26 kbps.

I want to get satellite internet, but to afford it I'll need to drop SBC altogether. That means VOIP for telephone, and they don't work with satellite.

I've got an e-mail in to Wild Blue, but haven't gotten a reply yet.

I'll be watching this thread..........
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 5:11:13 PM EDT


Believe it or not a Pringles can around the antenna can do wonders in distance. Look it up.
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 5:16:56 PM EDT
network stumbler is a cool diagnostic type program for seeing what wi-fi signals your system is picking up (gives signal levels, chanels and much more) freeware too

www.netstumbler.com/downloads/
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 5:28:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Breugel:
My ISP used to provide a wireless service. They mounted a 24 dB gain directional antenna on my roof shooting line of sight (no trees) about 1000 ft and had a full signal. I have no idea how much it costs...

http://www.radiolabs.com/products/antennas/2.4gig/2.4-aluminum-parabolic.php



Directional antenna is the way to go if your keeping to your original plan. You will have full signal with no worries. You have to have 2 of them facing one another. You can find them pretty cheap less than $200 online. search for wifi antenna or wifi directional antenna

Its fairly easy to do. You need either a access point/router of your own with 2 antenna outlets one for omni in your house, the other to hook the line up to your directional on your roof top or window lookin out towards neighbor, or you need a long cable from your desktop wifi card to the window/roof. Make sure your hardware (whatever you decide to get) has a removable antenna for the directional replacement
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