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Posted: 10/30/2010 3:59:46 AM EDT
I'm looking for some input as far as schools that have good communications programs. I generally don't know a lot about colleges as I went into the trades after some community college.

My daughter is 15 now with Honors in most classes, speech/debate team, band, and conservative minded. I want to steer her to the best school I can ( the least liberal too). After a bit of searching I found these schools...

1. University of Missouri-Columbia

2. Northwestern University

2. Syracuse

4. Minnesota

5. University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

6. University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

7. University of Wisconsin-Madison

8. Ohio State University Columbus

9. Michigan State University (MSU)

10. University of Southern California

Thoughts?
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 4:01:31 AM EDT
Like a TV newscaster job? Or corporate communications?
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 4:04:14 AM EDT
Most probably corporate
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 4:08:13 AM EDT
Don't take this the wrong way because I mean no disrespect, but push her/help her decide on a more marketable degree choice.


There's an old adage that states "only football players and frat boys who want to get drunk 24/7 take communications as a major".... if she has the intellect you say she does, help her make a better decision.


Just my $.02 though
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 4:10:15 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/30/2010 4:11:39 AM EDT by Kharn]
If my kid ever received a communications degree, he should be prepared to communicate in detail why I should not beat his ass for wasting four years of his life and my money. Communications degrees are also known as MRS degrees for a reason.

Kharn
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 4:14:06 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/30/2010 4:16:06 AM EDT by Ciph]

Originally Posted By Your1Savior:
Don't take this the wrong way because I mean no disrespect, but push her/help her decide on a more marketable degree choice.


There's an old adage that states "only football players and frat boys who want to get drunk 24/7 take communications as a major".... if she has the intellect you say she does, help her make a better decision.


Just my $.02 though

Nah I appreciate it. She's a great student and loves reading, writing, and arguing (politics too). I'm just looking to help her figure out what direction to go. She has said that she wants Zero's job if that's any kind of indicator.

ETA: She's also wanted to go into law and journalism
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 4:18:46 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/30/2010 4:21:37 AM EDT by Bladeswitcher]
I graduated from the University of Missouri School of Journalism about 25 years ago. It's a very good school, but centered more on journalism rather than corporate communications, though they do have a "strat-com" tract now. That said, I ended up working in corporate communications after a few years of working in journalism. That's actually a pretty common course, as a lot of folks find daily journalism to be a real drag after awhile. Journalism is actually a great foundation for communications work. There's no better school for learning to write than a daily newspaper.

I somewhat disagree with the previous poster who said that communications is not a marketable skill. It seems like these days fewer and fewer people know how to write and corporations are desperate for people who can string a coherent sentence together. Even in these tough times, there's are at least some jobs out there for people with communications skills. That said, finding a job often means being willing to travel to different markets. It's probably not a job for someone who insists on staying close to mommy (at least not during the early years of a career). It's also a career that tends to be somewhat limiting, in that eventually you find that your only options are other communications gigs. Though, there are plenty of examples of people making the job from PR/Communications positions to executive management. A lot of it probably depends on how pliable you are. Too strict interpretations of ethics, etc. is probably not cohesive to corporate advancement. That's probably another strike against a University of Missouri education.

Oh yeah, Mizzou is a fun school. Big time party school. And liberal as sin.

ETA: Journalism is an excellent pre-law degree –– especially when combined with a couple of years on a reporting beat. I can't figure out these kids who go straight from undergrad to grad school.
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 4:22:01 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Ciph:

Originally Posted By Your1Savior:
Don't take this the wrong way because I mean no disrespect, but push her/help her decide on a more marketable degree choice.


There's an old adage that states "only football players and frat boys who want to get drunk 24/7 take communications as a major".... if she has the intellect you say she does, help her make a better decision.


Just my $.02 though

Nah I appreciate it. She's a great student and loves reading, writing, and arguing (politics too). I'm just looking to help her figure out what direction to go. She has said that she wants Zero's job if that's any kind of indicator.

That's a worthy goal, and she could probably do it better than him too


With that said, I would recommend any of the core business majors or possibly a political science degree followed up with a JD if she's serious about politics. Otherwise, as I'm sure many here will tell you, an engineering degree is a great way to go... Or any of the hard sciences too.


Link Posted: 10/30/2010 4:31:53 AM EDT
First off, she is 15 years old, stop worrying about which college she is going to attend. She will likely change her mind several times before she graduates high school.
When she does graduate, send her to the local CC for two years. This gives her time to decide on a major based on her classroom experiences, rather than dragging out her time (and your money) at a four year school by turning it into a 6 or 8 year ordeal because she changed her mind a couple of times.

I'm relatively young (26) and I feel that people are pushed entirely too much to plan out their lives during high school. 15-18 year olds don't have a clue for the most part what they want to do for a career, and often times they are pushed too hard by their parents. Limit your 'steering' to keeping her on the road and out of the bad parts of town, so to speak.
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 4:32:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/30/2010 4:33:20 AM EDT by Your1Savior]

Originally Posted By Bladeswitcher:
I graduated from the University of Missouri School of Journalism about 25 years ago. It's a very good school, but centered more on journalism rather than corporate communications, though they do have a "strat-com" tract now. That said, I ended up working in corporate communications after a few years of working in journalism. That's actually a pretty common course, as a lot of folks find daily journalism to be a real drag after awhile. Journalism is actually a great foundation for communications work. There's no better school for learning to write than a daily newspaper.

I somewhat disagree with the previous poster who said that communications is not a marketable skill. It seems like these days fewer and fewer people know how to write and corporations are desperate for people who can string a coherent sentence together. Even in these tough times, there's are at least some jobs out there for people with communications skills. That said, finding a job often means being willing to travel to different markets. It's probably not a job for someone who insists on staying close to mommy (at least not during the early years of a career). It's also a career that tends to be somewhat limiting, in that eventually you find that your only options are other communications gigs. Though, there are plenty of examples of people making the job from PR/Communications positions to executive management. A lot of it probably depends on how pliable you are. Too strict interpretations of ethics, etc. is probably not cohesive to corporate advancement. That's probably another strike against a University of Missouri education.

Oh yeah, Mizzou is a fun school. Big time party school. And liberal as sin.

ETA: Journalism is an excellent pre-law degree –– especially when combined with a couple of years on a reporting beat. I can't figure out these kids who go straight from undergrad to grad school.


The part in bold is mostly what I was referring to as being more marketable. With a business degree for example, you could land a communications job or a handful of any other jobs in the business field.

I will say that the University of Missouri indeed does have the #1 rated J-school in the nation though... however that's not going to help them in Lincoln when the Huskers go on a safari hunt in 7 hours
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 4:32:28 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Bladeswitcher:
I graduated from the University of Missouri School of Journalism about 25 years ago. It's a very good school, but centered more on journalism rather than corporate communications, though they do have a "strat-com" tract now. That said, I ended up working in corporate communications after a few years of working in journalism. That's actually a pretty common course, as a lot of folks find daily journalism to be a real drag after awhile. Journalism is actually a great foundation for communications work. There's no better school for learning to write than a daily newspaper.

I somewhat disagree with the previous poster who said that communications is not a marketable skill. It seems like these days fewer and fewer people know how to write and corporations are desperate for people who can string a coherent sentence together. Even in these tough times, there's are at least some jobs out there for people with communications skills. That said, finding a job often means being willing to travel to different markets. It's probably not a job for someone who insists on staying close to mommy (at least not during the early years of a career). It's also a career that tends to be somewhat limiting, in that eventually you find that your only options are other communications gigs. Though, there are plenty of examples of people making the job from PR/Communications positions to executive management. A lot of it probably depends on how pliable you are. Too strict interpretations of ethics, etc. is probably not cohesive to corporate advancement. That's probably another strike against a University of Missouri education.

Oh yeah, Mizzou is a fun school. Big time party school. And liberal as sin.

ETA: Journalism is an excellent pre-law degree –– especially when combined with a couple of years on a reporting beat. I can't figure out these kids who go straight from undergrad to grad school.

Thanks, she has a lot of thinking to do as far as what direction and I as far as what I'm willing to pay for. Much appreciated.
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 4:36:59 AM EDT
I'd suggest a business degree with a double major or minor in communications....then an MBA down the road

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 4:37:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ZootTX:
First off, she is 15 years old, stop worrying about which college she is going to attend. She will likely change her mind several times before she graduates high school.
When she does graduate, send her to the local CC for two years. This gives her time to decide on a major based on her classroom experiences, rather than dragging out her time (and your money) at a four year school by turning it into a 6 or 8 year ordeal because she changed her mind a couple of times.

I'm relatively young (26) and I feel that people are pushed entirely too much to plan out their lives during high school. 15-18 year olds don't have a clue for the most part what they want to do for a career, and often times they are pushed too hard by their parents. Limit your 'steering' to keeping her on the road and out of the bad parts of town, so to speak.

I have considered this as well. The group she hangs with is pre-absorbed with higher schooling and is driving this issue. Personally I would even like her to looking into becoming a zoomie.
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 4:39:25 AM EDT
Ditto one a usable degree! I work at USC and have spent the past 20 years in broadcast. Journalism is a VERY hard arena to make it big in. I cannot tell you how many students I have worked with that were lucky to make over $8 per hour their first two or three years out of school. And USC has one of the top Journalism schools in the country. Too many unemployeed lawyers in the unemployment line these days too.
Does she have the personality to go into a medical career? My wife is an RN and just graduated from USC as a CRNA. Now there is some big bucks the day after passing boards!
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 4:41:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ZootTX:
First off, she is 15 years old, stop worrying about which college she is going to attend. She will likely change her mind several times before she graduates high school.
When she does graduate, send her to the local CC for two years. This gives her time to decide on a major based on her classroom experiences, rather than dragging out her time (and your money) at a four year school by turning it into a 6 or 8 year ordeal because she changed her mind a couple of times.

I'm relatively young (26) and I feel that people are pushed entirely too much to plan out their lives during high school. 15-18 year olds don't have a clue for the most part what they want to do for a career, and often times they are pushed too hard by their parents. Limit your 'steering' to keeping her on the road and out of the bad parts of town, so to speak.

This is really good advice, especially the part about CC for a couple years. I went to CC and got my gen. eds. out of the way... even then I didn't know exactly what I wanted to do. I ended up wasting a bunch of time, and money (sucks when you're paying for it yourself!), before finally deciding. I just graduated this year with a BS in business administration and I'm also 26.
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 4:45:23 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Your1Savior:
Don't take this the wrong way because I mean no disrespect, but push her/help her decide on a more marketable degree choice.


There's an old adage that states "only football players and frat boys who want to get drunk 24/7 take communications as a major".... if she has the intellect you say she does, help her make a better decision.


Just my $.02 though


I am going to +1 this.

My original intention was to post "SEC, Big 10, PAC 10, Big 12, and Boise State –– because they have the best football teams". That is the stereo type
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 4:45:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ScottsGT:
Ditto one a usable degree! I work at USC and have spent the past 20 years in broadcast. Journalism is a VERY hard arena to make it big in. I cannot tell you how many students I have worked with that were lucky to make over $8 per hour their first two or three years out of school. And USC has one of the top Journalism schools in the country. Too many unemployeed lawyers in the unemployment line these days too.
Does she have the personality to go into a medical career? My wife is an RN and just graduated from USC as a CRNA. Now there is some big bucks the day after passing boards!

Just from talking with her I would bet she doesn't have the stomach for it.
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 6:11:44 AM EDT
Eastern Michigan University.

When I went there their Communications program was considered to be the top in the nation, or so I was told.
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 6:16:17 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/30/2010 6:17:17 AM EDT by brickeyee]
Originally Posted By ZootTX:
First off, she is 15 years old, stop worrying about which college she is going to attend. She will likely change her mind several times before she graduates high school.
When she does graduate, send her to the local CC for two years. This gives her time to decide on a major based on her classroom experiences, rather than dragging out her time (and your money) at a four year school by turning it into a 6 or 8 year ordeal because she changed her mind a couple of times.

I'm relatively young (26) and I feel that people are pushed entirely too much to plan out their lives during high school. 15-18 year olds don't have a clue for the most part what they want to do for a career, and often times they are pushed too hard by their parents. Limit your 'steering' to keeping her on the road and out of the bad parts of town, so to speak.


Unless she is heading for hard science or engineering she has plenty of time.

This programs typically require four years of high school math, so a decision needs to be made early.

DO NOT pursue a hard science or engineering degree unless she really like it.

Doing something you hate can suck for the rest of your life.


The most important thing is WHAT DOES SHE WANT TO DO?
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 6:38:50 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 6:42:05 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Your1Savior:
Don't take this the wrong way because I mean no disrespect, but push her/help her decide on a more marketable degree choice.


There's an old adage that states "only football players and frat boys who want to get drunk 24/7 take communications as a major".... if she has the intellect you say she does, help her make a better decision.


Just my $.02 though


And that, good sir...it's a load of bullshit. We enjoy over 89 percent employment rate out of our college.
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 6:43:03 AM EDT
Lets see if I can break this down.

Engineering.
Accounting
Premed
Nursing
Hard science
Math

Not everyone can do it. If she's smart, she has an edge, and might be able to make it in one of those fields. With the exception of hard science/math, all of those options are virtually guaranteed cash, and in large quantities. Start by focusing your efforts here...
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 6:56:10 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Your1Savior:

I will say that the University of Missouri indeed does have the #1 rated J-school in the nation though... however that's not going to help them in Lincoln when the Huskers go on a safari hunt in 7 hours



Well, enjoy the hunt. Personally, I couldn't care less . . . though I understand Mizzou has done pretty well this year.
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 8:56:09 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/30/2010 9:05:18 AM EDT by AFARR]
Originally Posted By Couch-Commando:
Lets see if I can break this down.

Engineering.
Accounting
Premed
Nursing
Hard science
Math

Not everyone can do it. If she's smart, she has an edge, and might be able to make it in one of those fields. With the exception of hard science/math, all of those options are virtually guaranteed cash, and in large quantities. Start by focusing your efforts here...



Couch....I'd skip 'pre-med' as a major...and go for a PharmD or Physician Assistant degree instead, then go from there for an MD/DO afterwards.


Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 9:05:13 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Bladeswitcher:
I graduated from the University of Missouri School of Journalism about 25 years ago. It's a very good school, but centered more on journalism rather than corporate communications, though they do have a "strat-com" tract now. That said, I ended up working in corporate communications after a few years of working in journalism. That's actually a pretty common course, as a lot of folks find daily journalism to be a real drag after awhile. Journalism is actually a great foundation for communications work. There's no better school for learning to write than a daily newspaper.

I somewhat disagree with the previous poster who said that communications is not a marketable skill. It seems like these days fewer and fewer people know how to write and corporations are desperate for people who can string a coherent sentence together. Even in these tough times, there's are at least some jobs out there for people with communications skills. That said, finding a job often means being willing to travel to different markets. It's probably not a job for someone who insists on staying close to mommy (at least not during the early years of a career). It's also a career that tends to be somewhat limiting, in that eventually you find that your only options are other communications gigs. Though, there are plenty of examples of people making the job from PR/Communications positions to executive management. A lot of it probably depends on how pliable you are. Too strict interpretations of ethics, etc. is probably not cohesive to corporate advancement. That's probably another strike against a University of Missouri education.

Oh yeah, Mizzou is a fun school. Big time party school. And liberal as sin.

ETA: Journalism is an excellent pre-law degree –– especially when combined with a couple of years on a reporting beat. I can't figure out these kids who go straight from undergrad to grad school.



I agree with this, my sister has a PhD in communications. She went on after graduation to become...a professor of communications. She would like to change directions, but it is way too late now.


Steve

Link Posted: 10/30/2010 9:16:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Couch-Commando:
Lets see if I can break this down.

Engineering.
Accounting
Premed
Nursing
Hard science
Math

Not everyone can do it. If she's smart, she has an edge, and might be able to make it in one of those fields. With the exception of hard science/math, all of those options are virtually guaranteed cash, and in large quantities. Start by focusing your efforts here...

I see you are not taking your own advice, Mr econ major
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 9:39:10 AM EDT

Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Originally Posted By ZootTX:
First off, she is 15 years old, stop worrying about which college she is going to attend. She will likely change her mind several times before she graduates high school.
When she does graduate, send her to the local CC for two years. This gives her time to decide on a major based on her classroom experiences, rather than dragging out her time (and your money) at a four year school by turning it into a 6 or 8 year ordeal because she changed her mind a couple of times.

I'm relatively young (26) and I feel that people are pushed entirely too much to plan out their lives during high school. 15-18 year olds don't have a clue for the most part what they want to do for a career, and often times they are pushed too hard by their parents. Limit your 'steering' to keeping her on the road and out of the bad parts of town, so to speak.


Unless she is heading for hard science or engineering she has plenty of time.

This programs typically require four years of high school math, so a decision needs to be made early.

DO NOT pursue a hard science or engineering degree unless she really like it.

Doing something you hate can suck for the rest of your life.


The most important thing is WHAT DOES SHE WANT TO DO?

She is all over the place. Last year it went from Lawyer to journalist, to politician to President. Perhaps it will come to her soon. She really loves reading,writing, and arguing issues. Math isn't her strongest nor the weakest and she likes the life sciences Biology etc.
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 9:50:27 AM EDT
Most of the media and journalism geeks I know get all gooey over Northwestern. Personally you couldn't pay me to live in Evanston no mater how good the school is.

The PR girl I have worked with in the past few years went to Minnesota. She knows her stuff. Of the schools listed, I would say Madison is the best overall. Then again I'm a little biased.

In communications it really boils down to hands on experience and internship opportunities. She may be better off going to a brown brick college if she can rise to the top faster. Once that happens she should be able to find those opportunities faster.
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 9:52:11 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/30/2010 9:53:08 AM EDT by Ewald]
Double tap
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 9:59:36 AM EDT
My brother in law has a Mass Com degree from SIU-Carbondale.

IT IS A PARTY SCHOOL. DO NOT SAY I DIDN'T WARN YOU.

Your kid should get an apartment off campus to avoid the crazy. My ex's brother partied too much and had to come home.
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 10:00:36 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Ciph:

I have considered this as well. The group she hangs with is pre-absorbed with higher schooling and is driving this issue. Personally I would even like her to looking into becoming a zoomie.


Where are you located? IM if necessary, I went to a VERY GOOD CC.
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 10:18:01 AM EDT
Have her look into English.
Link Posted: 10/30/2010 12:48:22 PM EDT
Earned mine from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington.
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