Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
BCM
User Panel

Site Notices
Posted: 6/21/2011 11:02:02 PM EDT
What do they do? Would it be worth it to join? Do they have age etc. standards? Are they considered LEO (they are part of homeland security).
And for those who want to get ignorant about joining the "real" military, I am ex-Army.(19E)  E-5 Desert Storm vet. I am too old to re-enlist and have a full time .gov job. I am just thinking about joining up to help out and get to play on water occasionally.
Link Posted: 6/21/2011 11:04:11 PM EDT
[#1]
I read this to say "Coast Guard Artillery" and got really excited that they were starting to take thier coastal defence mission seriously again... but alas...
Link Posted: 6/21/2011 11:46:36 PM EDT
[#2]
Quoted:
What do they do? Would it be worth it to join? Do they have age etc. standards? Are they considered LEO (they are part of homeland security).
And for those who want to get ignorant about joining the "real" military, I am ex-Army.(19E)  E-5 Desert Storm vet. I am too old to re-enlist and have a full time .gov job. I am just thinking about joining up to help out and get to play on water occasionally.


No LEO authority. No guns.  

Up here in AK the CG provides some 25ft safe boats to bolster the auxiliaries fleet of mostly slow fiberglass boats.  The do a lot of courtesy vessel safety checks and help out on minor SAR or tow cases.  They don't do much heavy weather SAR.  

A big part of their mission up here is boater education and helping people before they leave the dock so the Coast Guard doesn't have to go rescue people later.

As far as I know, there are no age restrictions.  You see lots of older people (60's to 70's) out on the auxiliary boats.
Link Posted: 6/22/2011 2:47:05 AM EDT
[#3]
Believe me, no age limits.

I went to a meeting a couple years ago to check them out.  I was 49 at the time.

I mentioned it to a Coastie buddy and he laughed, saying, "I'll bet you were the youngest one there!"

Almost - there was one person younger than me.

Here in Charleston they mainly do boating safety inspections.
Link Posted: 6/22/2011 2:53:44 AM EDT
[#4]
I met one at a 10 a lake doing inspections all decked out in bdu's with his boots bloused taking his job way too seriously
Link Posted: 6/22/2011 3:09:04 AM EDT
[#5]
Quoted:
I met one at a 10 a lake doing inspections all decked out in bdu's with his boots bloused taking his job way too seriously

BDU's?

Or are you talking ODU's?

Big difference, one looks military and the other looks like a janitor.


I'm in the CG btw.

The Aux is allowed to wear our ODU's and yes some do take their job to seriously, but without them we would be overworked.
Link Posted: 6/22/2011 3:19:42 AM EDT
[#6]
23 years on active duty, still in.   I've spent hundreds of hours with Auxies and will always cherish the wisdom and experience they bring not to mention the dedication and shear number of hours they are willing to volunteer.   I've known guys who want to do nothing but work in the comms room answering phones to running radios planning search grids and training the younger active duty members.  There is something to be said about guys who have lived in an area for 35 plus years when the average CG member is only there for 3-4 years.   That local area knowledge can mean life or death at times.   I've also know many that will do just about anything from help cook in the galley, fix engines, work on the grounds or even come in everyday to post colors with a salute.  There are hundreds of them that use their own equipment for patrols from boats to planes to SUV's on beach patrol.  

 

My favorite memory will be sitting in a boat on the river at the end of the runway at NAS Jacksonville, FL during an airshow with my dad.  We were so close we had to wear ear plugs and could read the pilots names painted near the cockpit.   We were one of two picket boats keeping the area clear the whole weekend.    (Dad lost his battle with cancer March of 2010, he was always proud to put on a blue uniform and go out with me when he could, I'll miss those days for sure)


If you want to look for a sense of purpose and surround yourself with dedicated members of the service then jump at it.
Link Posted: 6/22/2011 3:31:21 AM EDT
[#7]
They're one of only 2 military auxiliaries (Civil Air Patrol being the USAF aux) and probably the only one well respected by their parent branch.

You won't see CAP aircrews working side by side with USAF aircrews for anything, although they do use CAP chaplains when they're short. USCG Aux guys, once trained, can do just about anything a fulltime coastie will do short of the LE and rescue swimmer stuff. In areas where there's no USCG activity most of what they do is boat inspections and courtesy stuff on the local lakes.

We got a couple of retirees in my ARES group who are never home, they're working Auxie stuff somewhere.
Link Posted: 6/22/2011 3:47:26 AM EDT
[#8]
My best friend in in the CG Aux here and is their recruiting officer, which is why I'm always fnding CG Aux brochures on my coffee table when he leaves. The biggest thing they do is the education and shore side checks. They do have a qualification for their boat crews and the boat crews are limited to what they are supposed to do on the water etc.



They do provide a public service and it's not a bad why to spend you're weekend/days off if your in to that kind of thing.
Link Posted: 6/22/2011 4:17:52 AM EDT
[#9]
Quoted:
23 years on active duty, still in.   I've spent hundreds of hours with Auxies and will always cherish the wisdom and experience they bring not to mention the dedication and shear number of hours they are willing to volunteer.   I've known guys who want to do nothing but work in the comms room answering phones to running radios planning search grids and training the younger active duty members.  There is something to be said about guys who have lived in an area for 35 plus years when the average CG member is only there for 3-4 years.   That local area knowledge can mean life or death at times.   I've also know many that will do just about anything from help cook in the galley, fix engines, work on the grounds or even come in everyday to post colors with a salute.  There are hundreds of them that use their own equipment for patrols from boats to planes to SUV's on beach patrol.  
[red][/red(The Coast Guard provides the fuel.)
 

My favorite memory will be sitting in a boat on the river at the end of the runway at NAS Jacksonville, FL during an airshow with my dad.  We were so close we had to wear ear plugs and could read the pilots names painted near the cockpit.   We were one of two picket boats keeping the area clear the whole weekend.    (Dad lost his battle with cancer March of 2010, he was always proud to put on a blue uniform and go out with me when he could, I'll miss those days for sure)


If you want to look for a sense of purpose and surround yourself with dedicated members of the service then jump at it.


All true.  We've had guys (and gals) stand comms watch 4-5 days a week, a HUGE help.   I think it beats the hell out of sitting around an empty house or with a nagging spouse in your old age.
Link Posted: 6/22/2011 5:35:23 AM EDT
[#10]
Ex coastie here. Do it it's a huge help to the full timers and the younger guys love the extra body during watch.  Its pretty fun too from what my old buddy doc used to tell me when he stood watch with me.
Link Posted: 6/22/2011 9:37:35 AM EDT
[#11]
Ok, you fellers convinced me, I will look into it.
Link Posted: 6/22/2011 10:42:33 AM EDT
[#12]
Link Posted: 6/22/2011 11:02:39 AM EDT
[#13]
I went fishing with a couple of friends of mine. We were out by the Farallones, along the coast by Muir beach and Stinson. When we came back in the gate, we saw a sail boat in distress. Weather was drizzle/fog, cold and getting worse. These 2 guys were drunk as hell and one was in the water! Too stupid to know how close he came to dieing.

Anyway, we get them on shore in Sausalito and are making our way back to the Berkeley marina when we run out of gas.

We are stuck off the Richmond shore and starting to drift towards it. We drop anchor.The wind was picking up and wasn't helping matters. A call to the CG resulted in, we're busy with a couple of other "real" emergencies.

They notify the auxiliary.They responded as  they were making they're last patrol.

These "old coots" show up in a 35 foot wooden yacht. I thought "oh brother, here we go".

That old guy lashed us to side of his boat, brought us into the harbor and put us right into the slip just as gently as you please, the first time, with no damage to either boat! They of course, would accept no money, gathered up their ropes, gave a wave and were off. Never even got their names. And they gave us some coffee from their thermos!

They surely saved us from a miserable, dangerous situation that day.

I will always remember them and their selfless dedication to help other boaters.
Link Posted: 6/22/2011 11:23:00 AM EDT
[#14]
Quoted:
23 years on active duty, still in.   I've spent hundreds of hours with Auxies and will always cherish the wisdom and experience they bring not to mention the dedication and shear number of hours they are willing to volunteer.   I've known guys who want to do nothing but work in the comms room answering phones to running radios planning search grids and training the younger active duty members.  There is something to be said about guys who have lived in an area for 35 plus years when the average CG member is only there for 3-4 years.   That local area knowledge can mean life or death at times.   I've also know many that will do just about anything from help cook in the galley, fix engines, work on the grounds or even come in everyday to post colors with a salute.  There are hundreds of them that use their own equipment for patrols from boats to planes to SUV's on beach patrol.  



Thanks - I'm coxswain qualified and I've spent countless hours on patrols in Tampa Bay, both on my operational facility ('boat' to you landlubbers) and on other vessels. Now that I've moved to Utah, it's time to get involved here.

Before you can take any training around operations quals, you'll need to complete an SF-86 and get fingerprinted. Some quals require ICS/FEMA courses, some of which can be taken online.

I became coxswain qualified at age 42, the youngest in my Flotilla 71 and 74.

USCGA is a lot of fun and work - I can't recommend it highly enough.
Link Posted: 6/22/2011 11:34:38 AM EDT
[#15]
I was in the USCG for 24.5 years and worked with many in the Auxiliary over the years.  I always appreciated the dedication and hard work they do.  I have a great respect for all of them.  To those who are on this board that are members.  Many thanks!
Close Join Our Mail List to Stay Up To Date! Win a FREE Membership!

Sign up for the ARFCOM weekly newsletter and be entered to win a free ARFCOM membership. One new winner* is announced every week!

You will receive an email every Friday morning featuring the latest chatter from the hottest topics, breaking news surrounding legislation, as well as exclusive deals only available to ARFCOM email subscribers.


By signing up you agree to our User Agreement. *Must have a registered ARFCOM account to win.
Top Top