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Posted: 1/7/2012 11:27:34 AM EDT
If you have some wooded land you want cleared, what is the best way to do this? I'm talking at least a couple acres maybe more. Will a logging company come in and pay you? Sorry if it's a dumb question.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 11:30:29 AM EDT
Depends where you are, how many trees, and what kinds. In the Hudson Valley there are a few places that do it for the wood but then you usually have to get the stumps out.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 11:30:35 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 11:31:05 AM EDT
A lot depends on type of trees and their size. Some trees are worth it and some aren't.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 11:31:20 AM EDT
I think they might pay you if you have a stand of old growth walnuts.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 11:34:07 AM EDT
In my area there are a few firewood companies that will take care of business for you. It is harder for them to get good wood than the big boys. Check your phone book for "firewood".
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 11:35:53 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/7/2012 11:36:34 AM EDT by MotorMouth]
A buddy of mine has some folks come by his farm every fifteen years or so to harvest trees off of his back 40. They pay him 15-25k depending on the harvest, but then again, they don't want anything less than 12 inches in diameter, and they leave behind the stumps and the tops.

So I don't think that a logging company will clear the land for you unless there is some additional consideration involved, like they get to keep all of the wood and they pay you nothing.

Of course, if the trees aren't worth anything to them, you'll have to pay them.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 11:38:32 AM EDT
The reason I ask is that in a couple years or less, I want to move away from the suburbs. I'm looking at some different property now just to get some ideas. Assuming things go well with my job and my girlfriend's job, I am finding some houses with a good amount of land that we could afford. Heck, one even has 25 acres, and it's still within 20 minutes to work.

Many of these lots are wooded with just a small amount cleared around the house. I want at least a couple more acres out back cleared so It can turn into a meadow with the woods farther behind that. I would also like paths cut through the woods for 4 wheeling.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 11:39:17 AM EDT
Originally Posted By MotorMouth:
A buddy of mine has some folks come by his farm every fifteen years or so to harvest trees off of his back 40. They pay him 15-25k depending on the harvest, but then again, they don't want anything less than 12 inches in diameter, and they leave behind the stumps and the tops.

So I don't think that a logging company will clear the land for you unless there is some additional consideration involved, like they get to keep all of the wood and they pay you nothing.

Of course, if the trees aren't worth anything to them, you'll have to pay them.


That's called high-grading and will eventually ruin the guy's place. The loggers know this.

That stuff they leave behind? It's probably just as old as the stuff they cut, but has been suppressed so long that it will never amount to anything more than stubby junk. Generally speaking (and there are exceptions) he's much, MUCH better off clearcutting hardwoods and starting over with a new stand.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 11:40:29 AM EDT
Originally Posted By RAL:
The reason I ask is that in a couple years or less, I want to move away from the suburbs. I'm looking at some different property now just to get some ideas. Assuming things go well with my job and my girlfriend's job, I am finding some houses with a good amount of land that we could afford. Heck, one even has 25 acres, and it's still within 20 minutes to work.

Many of these lots are wooded with just a small amount cleared around the house. I want at least a couple more acres out back cleared so It can turn into a meadow with the woods farther behind that. I would also like paths cut through the woods for 4 wheeling.


Timber could be worth $5k per acre or it could be useless trash and the only way to know for sure is to find a local forester (not a logger who won't have your best interests in mind) and have them cruise the place.

Link Posted: 1/7/2012 11:42:10 AM EDT
Is there a machine I could rent? I have a chainsaw, but that would be more work than I want to tackle by myself.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 11:44:16 AM EDT
Originally Posted By RAL:
Is there a machine I could rent? I have a chainsaw, but that would be more work than I want to tackle by myself.


It's called a bulldozer and it's not cheap.

Honestly, we're in the exact same boat; we're making an offer this weekend on a small farm that has 10-15 acres that needs to be cleaned up and reforested and I haven't made my mind up yet on how to go about it. I suppose I can figure that out once it's bought.

Link Posted: 1/7/2012 11:44:19 AM EDT
Originally Posted By arowneragain:
Originally Posted By MotorMouth:
A buddy of mine has some folks come by his farm every fifteen years or so to harvest trees off of his back 40. They pay him 15-25k depending on the harvest, but then again, they don't want anything less than 12 inches in diameter, and they leave behind the stumps and the tops.

So I don't think that a logging company will clear the land for you unless there is some additional consideration involved, like they get to keep all of the wood and they pay you nothing.

Of course, if the trees aren't worth anything to them, you'll have to pay them.


That's called high-grading and will eventually ruin the guy's place. The loggers know this.

That stuff they leave behind? It's probably just as old as the stuff they cut, but has been suppressed so long that it will never amount to anything more than stubby junk. Generally speaking (and there are exceptions) he's much, MUCH better off clearcutting hardwoods and starting over with a new stand.


Really? Shit, I'll have to pass it along to him. Damned Amish tricksters. (Seriously, they're Amish.)

I don't know that he'll care though. He, and his father before him, have been doing that for as long as they've owned the property, and they still get plenty of what they have woods for - deer.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 11:47:27 AM EDT
If you have amish nearby some of them will come and either do it for free, or a bit of money either way depending on the tree types/sizes. One place I lived they'd usually pay a small amount and would totally clear it for you. They used it all for firewood and lumber for the furnature and crafts they sell.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 11:50:08 AM EDT
Originally Posted By arowneragain:
Originally Posted By RAL:
Is there a machine I could rent? I have a chainsaw, but that would be more work than I want to tackle by myself.


It's called a bulldozer and it's not cheap.

Honestly, we're in the exact same boat; we're making an offer this weekend on a small farm that has 10-15 acres that needs to be cleaned up and reforested and I haven't made my mind up yet on how to go about it. I suppose I can figure that out once it's bought.



A professional land clearing company will come in, clear, grub (remove stumps) push all the debris into a pile, secure the proper permits, burn it and attend to the pile. As arowneragain said, not cheap.

Then again if you could sell some of the timber you may be able to have a clearing crew come in behind, grub and burn and not be out of pocket by a whole lot.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 11:51:22 AM EDT
Originally Posted By MotorMouth:
Originally Posted By arowneragain:
Originally Posted By MotorMouth:
A buddy of mine has some folks come by his farm every fifteen years or so to harvest trees off of his back 40. They pay him 15-25k depending on the harvest, but then again, they don't want anything less than 12 inches in diameter, and they leave behind the stumps and the tops.

So I don't think that a logging company will clear the land for you unless there is some additional consideration involved, like they get to keep all of the wood and they pay you nothing.

Of course, if the trees aren't worth anything to them, you'll have to pay them.


That's called high-grading and will eventually ruin the guy's place. The loggers know this.

That stuff they leave behind? It's probably just as old as the stuff they cut, but has been suppressed so long that it will never amount to anything more than stubby junk. Generally speaking (and there are exceptions) he's much, MUCH better off clearcutting hardwoods and starting over with a new stand.


Really? Shit, I'll have to pass it along to him. Damned Amish tricksters. (Seriously, they're Amish.)

I don't know that he'll care though. He, and his father before him, have been doing that for as long as they've owned the property, and they still get plenty of what they have woods for - deer.


Like I said, there are cases where diameter-limit-cutting can be beneficial to a stand of timber. However, 90% of the time, especially here in the south, you're better off clearcutting the place and starting a new stand.

This assumes that you start with an even-aged mixed stand of timber, and take out the dominant (fastest growing) desireable trees and leave the subdominant (slower growing) undesireables.

Now, if, on the other hand, you start with a more-or-less pure stand of one species or several equally desireable species and harvest the site so much that a new cohort of desireables can begin to grow, then you later harvest those remaining trees to 'release' the second generation, you can end up with a perpetually sustained uneven-aged stand of timber.

I can't say what's going on with your friend; I can only say that it's very common for loggers to sell people a shuck-and-jive story about 'thinning your timber' when in reality they're thinning out all the good stuff and leaving you a pile of junk that will never be worth anything. this is why you should always hire a forester, not a logger, to give advice on timber management.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 11:53:47 AM EDT
Originally Posted By wilNva:
If you have amish nearby some of them will come and either do it for free, or a bit of money either way depending on the tree types/sizes. One place I lived they'd usually pay a small amount and would totally clear it for you. They used it all for firewood and lumber for the furnature and crafts they sell.


Down by my father's property there are Amish just down the street. My father may sell me his property this spring. This was another reason I asked this question, because if I buy this I will want some land cleared there also. Thank you, I didn't think of this.

Link Posted: 1/7/2012 11:55:32 AM EDT
Originally Posted By RAL:
Is there a machine I could rent? I have a chainsaw, but that would be more work than I want to tackle by myself.



Depending on how much and difficulty involved, you could easily get in over your head. I do this for a living and have for over 25 years. What looks easy to most is not and can in fact be very dangerous depending on your experience, the conditions, etc.

You may also have other hoops to jump through such as erosion control, zoning, etc. It all depends on your locale and you better find out before you start. Otherwise you could find yourself side ways of the law.

Link Posted: 1/7/2012 11:57:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/7/2012 11:58:27 AM EDT by pilotman]
Originally Posted By rebel_rifle:
Originally Posted By RAL:
Is there a machine I could rent? I have a chainsaw, but that would be more work than I want to tackle by myself.



Depending on how much and difficulty involved, you could easily get in over your head. I do this for a living and have for over 25 years. What looks easy to most is not and can in fact be very dangerous depending on your experience, the conditions, etc.

You may also have other hoops to jump through such as erosion control, zoning, etc. It all depends on your locale and you better find out before you start. Otherwise you could find yourself side ways of the law.



Yup. Lot of places may require a land disturbance permit and all work must be done in accordance with E&S regs. Can lead to BIG $$$$ fines, too.

And after you're done you're going to have one hell of a mess that will need to be graded. Anyone can jump on a D6 and tear some stuff up, that's not grading.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 12:08:42 PM EDT
Originally Posted By pilotman:
Originally Posted By rebel_rifle:
Originally Posted By RAL:
Is there a machine I could rent? I have a chainsaw, but that would be more work than I want to tackle by myself.



Depending on how much and difficulty involved, you could easily get in over your head. I do this for a living and have for over 25 years. What looks easy to most is not and can in fact be very dangerous depending on your experience, the conditions, etc.

You may also have other hoops to jump through such as erosion control, zoning, etc. It all depends on your locale and you better find out before you start. Otherwise you could find yourself side ways of the law.



Yup. Lot of places may require a land disturbance permit and all work must be done in accordance with E&S regs. Can lead to BIG $$$$ fines, too.

And after you're done you're going to have one hell of a mess that will need to be graded. Anyone can jump on a D6 and tear some stuff up, that's not grading.



Darn, this maybe harder than I thought.

If I buy my families place, It's only about 5 1/2 acres. It's real secluded in the hills near the PA. border. This is just a recreational place, not a permanent residence. We have a range set up, shooting up into the hill side. I would want to clear more out to lengthen and widen the range. I would like to take out a few trees around the house to open up the area a little more.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 12:13:43 PM EDT
I love clearing land and do it as a side job. You need to rent a 15 or 20 ton excavator with a thumb, clear it and pile it all up, wait for a good rain and set it on fire.

To rent a 15 or 20 ton hoe isent going to be cheap. For a John deere 160 your looking at $4000 for a month, and for a 200 excavator about $5000 a month. You can split those numbers by four and get your weekly rental rate.

Link Posted: 1/7/2012 12:22:19 PM EDT
Originally Posted By icex:
I love clearing land and do it as a side job. You need to rent a 15 or 20 ton excavator with a thumb, clear it and pile it all up, wait for a good rain and set it on fire.

To rent a 15 or 20 ton hoe isent going to be cheap. For a John deere 160 your looking at $4000 for a month, and for a 200 excavator about $5000 a month. You can split those numbers by four and get your weekly rental rate.



I do this also and agree, However make sure you can burn as some counties were I live will not let you burn
And disposal fees are higher sometimes than clearing




Link Posted: 1/7/2012 12:29:04 PM EDT
it depends on the size and type of tree, and also your soil, here I have shallow soil so the trees don't have tap roots.
My trees were mostly 12" and smaller but I had 40 yo cedar stumps that were 2-3' across.
I used a jd350 and medium excavator (tilt trailer not lowboy) the excavator is nice because you can haystack the stumps for burning.
I would suggest a layer of stumps then branches then stumps, cover it and let it season over summer then burn in the rainy fall.
the excavator can easily move your logs to where you want them.

another option is a cat with a spike on the back, it quarters the stump then pushes out 1 quarter at time, but doesn't stack worth shit (but is cheaper).
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 12:34:32 PM EDT
Originally Posted By RAL:
Is there a machine I could rent? I have a chainsaw, but that would be more work than I want to tackle by myself.


C'mon man. This is ARFCOM GD. You're gonna need AT LEAST a Tigercat 718. Minimum.
Link Posted: 1/7/2012 12:37:29 PM EDT
Depends on timber value if someone will pay you for it

And then you have to deal with stumps.

Stumps are best dealt with using a D7.

Figure $800-1200 per acre depending your local pricing and how much diesel is at the time.
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