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Posted: 3/19/2013 7:52:34 AM EDT
Lil' Bear just spent a year in a Montessori school. I don't think her time is well utilized, but worse the liberal derp is strong with parents and teachers.

Mama Bear and I are looking into Classical Schools (2 day classroom, the rest is homeschooling). Is anyone trying Classical Schools? What is your experience?

Thanks Kbear.
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 7:56:22 AM EDT
Traditional private is the way to go. Homeschooling just doesn't expose kids to all the social interaction they would otherwise get. Not to mention the sports and club activities.
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 7:58:47 AM EDT
Originally Posted By AKengineer:
Traditional private is the way to go. Homeschooling just doesn't expose kids to all the social interaction they would otherwise get. Not to mention the sports and club activities.


In before all the homeschoolers tell you how wrong you are
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 8:06:09 AM EDT
Originally Posted By DukeFan23:
Originally Posted By AKengineer:
Traditional private is the way to go. Homeschooling just doesn't expose kids to all the social interaction they would otherwise get. Not to mention the sports and club activities.


In before all the homeschoolers tell you how wrong you are


i'm not telling anybody they're wrong or right....
i was mainly enrolled in private schools, but had a time at 100% homeschooling as well......i never lacked any socializing or sporting activities. granted, some were with the church, but i played baseball, football, and soccer with the local pee-wee type sports groups. there are valid reasons for not homeschooling, but if social interaction is a problem (as in there isn't enough) then the parents are being lazy.
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 8:09:28 AM EDT
I want to do private school, but the nearest non-religion based one is an hour away.

I am going to look into the homeschooling or see if there is any homeschooling groups in our area.

At 9th grade she can go to public school to play sports, go to prom, have cliques or whatever high school girls do.

A teacher I had in high school did that with all three of his kids. All of them are super smart, very social (normal) and very popular. They breezed through classes too since the standardized testing in elementary school didn't have a chance to ruin them.
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 8:10:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/19/2013 8:16:36 AM EDT by TrojanMan]
Well, the sales pitch is that Montessori leads into a classical-style guided education.
That Montessori gives kids the baseline fundamentals for both independent study and social collaboration.
That there is a cumulative effect to education, and that Montessori is the fastest way to build the required foundation.

Is that accurate? I don't know.


ETA: WRT public schools... if you're going to send your kids to public school (and there are reasons to do so, not the least of which is to introduce them to the failures of bureaucratic ineptitude), DO NOT do it for high school. At least, not if your kid thinks they might want to go to college.

Public high school (and this does vary), is basically 1.5 years of education stretched out over 4. They will waste a significant portion of your child's time. If they want to be academically challenged, don't do it.

Of course, middle or junior high is just as bad, but the advantage there is that extracurriculars don't take up so much time that you can't supplement at home to keep them on-pace with the rest of their civilized peers. You try to do this in high school, with higher workloads and more sports/activities, when they also want to date, go out with friends, learn to drive... Not going to happen.

The 5th to 8th grade window is the best target for public school indoctrination. It'll also help them to really appreciate their private high school, because they'll already know how bad it is on the other side.
You give them private school for their whole life and then throw them in a public high school? They're going to hate it for 4 years.
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 8:12:43 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 8:15:23 AM EDT
My daughter goes to a Private School now and will continue until my son who is six months old starts. Then we may have to evaluate Home Schooling because of the costs. The Church she goes to school at has a Classical School too which we may look into. It allows them access to Social Activities and Sports at the Private School but without the full costs or full time teaching.
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 8:25:37 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 8:28:54 AM EDT
Originally Posted By DukeFan23:
Originally Posted By AKengineer:
Traditional private is the way to go. Homeschooling just doesn't expose kids to all the social interaction they would otherwise get. Not to mention the sports and club activities.


In before all the homeschoolers tell you how wrong you are


He's so wrong..............

Frankly, having been surrounded by homeschooled kids for several years now, I have forgotten what the problem was..........homeschooling is so common now that the social objections are irrelevant.
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 8:35:54 AM EDT
Originally Posted By MRW:
Montessori is the anti-classical. Classical schooling is curriculum based and assumes there is a set curriculum that students should learn, including the seven liberal arts of grammar, logic, rhetoric, mathematics, music, geometry, and astronomy (now expanded to all physical sciences), and seeks to train the student to think and reason, not just memorize and mimic. The end goal of most classical schools is to teach students how to learn, rather than merely job-train them. this basic model of education traces its roots clear back to the ancient Greeks, and is called Liberal Arts because it was the education of free men, or education that makes one free, as opposed to a slave who only has to be trained to do a particular job. (servile arts)
There are different styles of classical education, so do some research. See my sig line.

Montessori is the "progressive" approach to education that is student based. The kids explore what interests them and choose for themselves what they will learn.

Do you let your 5 year old decide what he will eat for dinner, or do you choose for him or allow him to choose from several options because you know what makes for a healthy human? Your answer will determine which education system you prefer.



If you are interested in homeschooling, look up "classical conversations" in your area.

<-- classical HS teacher


As much a fan of homeschooling as I am, if I lived close to a school that had a curriculum as described above and teachers - with the freedom to control their classrooms - like MRW to teach, I'd be perfectly comfortable sending my kids there.

+1 to MRW's contrast of Classical with Montessori.
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 8:46:00 AM EDT

Originally Posted By arowneragain:


He's so wrong..............

Frankly, having been surrounded by homeschooled kids for several years now, I have forgotten what the problem was..........homeschooling is so common now that the social objections are irrelevant.

Tell me about your senior prom.
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 8:55:11 AM EDT
Originally Posted By AKengineer:

Originally Posted By arowneragain:


He's so wrong..............

Frankly, having been surrounded by homeschooled kids for several years now, I have forgotten what the problem was..........homeschooling is so common now that the social objections are irrelevant.

Tell me about your senior prom.


Hell, I went to public school and to my senior prom, both sucked.

Other than getting really good at slacking off and copying homework most of my learning was done in trade school or at work. Beyond 9th grade math and english I really don't use a lot of the things I learned in school.

The rest that I know I either learned via reading on my own time, or out of necessity at work.

And I still actively seek knowledge, I always have a few books being read at one time, and a new skill set I am trying to learn. I am hoping that homeschooling my daughter will teach her to learn on her own terms, so after the basics she can seek out what interests her and hopefully make a living off it some day.

My teachers hated me in school, I refused to do homework and barely paid attention but aced tests and quizes and breezed through most of the standardized tests (my year was the last year before the new batch of mandatory ones behind us)

I didn't care to learn what they were cramming down our throats, but luckily my retention skills are borderline ridiculous so I was able to just sort of glide through high school, good thing there was trade school for two years of it or I would have gone insane.
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 9:00:36 AM EDT

Originally Posted By MRW:
Montessori is the anti-classical. Classical schooling is curriculum based and assumes there is a set curriculum that students should learn, including the seven liberal arts of grammar, logic, rhetoric, mathematics, music, geometry, and astronomy (now expanded to all physical sciences), and seeks to train the student to think and reason, not just memorize and mimic. The end goal of most classical schools is to teach students how to learn, rather than merely job-train them. this basic model of education traces its roots clear back to the ancient Greeks, and is called Liberal Arts because it was the education of free men, or education that makes one free, as opposed to a slave who only has to be trained to do a particular job. (servile arts)
There are different styles of classical education, so do some research. See my sig line.

Montessori is the "progressive" approach to education that is student based. The kids explore what interests them and choose for themselves what they will learn.

Do you let your 5 year old decide what he will eat for dinner, or do you choose for him or allow him to choose from several options because you know what makes for a healthy human? Your answer will determine which education system you prefer.



If you are interested in homeschooling, look up "classical conversations" in your area.

<-- classical HS teacher

pretty much all the sources i am finding for Classical schooling seem to be religion based. are there secular schools that have a Classical curriculum?
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 9:01:03 AM EDT
Originally Posted By AKengineer:

Originally Posted By arowneragain:


He's so wrong..............

Frankly, having been surrounded by homeschooled kids for several years now, I have forgotten what the problem was..........homeschooling is so common now that the social objections are irrelevant.

Tell me about your senior prom.


You make my point. That isn't socialization. That's whoring your daughters out.

Link Posted: 3/19/2013 9:02:06 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 9:09:47 AM EDT
Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:
Originally Posted By mcantu:
pretty much all the sources i am finding for Classical schooling seem to be religion based. are there secular schools that have a Classical curriculum?

Since part of the classical curriculum is the Bible (because it informs morality and ethics), how would you engage in secular Bible studies?


treat it as literature, as it should be
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 9:10:31 AM EDT
Originally Posted By mcantu:

Originally Posted By MRW:
Montessori is the anti-classical. Classical schooling is curriculum based and assumes there is a set curriculum that students should learn, including the seven liberal arts of grammar, logic, rhetoric, mathematics, music, geometry, and astronomy (now expanded to all physical sciences), and seeks to train the student to think and reason, not just memorize and mimic. The end goal of most classical schools is to teach students how to learn, rather than merely job-train them. this basic model of education traces its roots clear back to the ancient Greeks, and is called Liberal Arts because it was the education of free men, or education that makes one free, as opposed to a slave who only has to be trained to do a particular job. (servile arts)
There are different styles of classical education, so do some research. See my sig line.

Montessori is the "progressive" approach to education that is student based. The kids explore what interests them and choose for themselves what they will learn.

Do you let your 5 year old decide what he will eat for dinner, or do you choose for him or allow him to choose from several options because you know what makes for a healthy human? Your answer will determine which education system you prefer.



If you are interested in homeschooling, look up "classical conversations" in your area.

<-- classical HS teacher

pretty much all the sources i am finding for Classical schooling seem to be religion based. are there secular schools that have a Classical curriculum?


I have the same issue here. It's either catholic schools, or crazy hippy schools where the emphasis isn't on learning, but on "being free" and other stupid shit.
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 9:12:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:
Originally Posted By mcantu:
pretty much all the sources i am finding for Classical schooling seem to be religion based. are there secular schools that have a Classical curriculum?

Since part of the classical curriculum is the Bible (because it informs morality and ethics), how would you engage in secular Bible studies?


i was going off MRWs definition of Classical schooling having its roots in Ancient Greece
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 9:13:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By arowneragain:
Originally Posted By AKengineer:

Originally Posted By arowneragain:


He's so wrong..............

Frankly, having been surrounded by homeschooled kids for several years now, I have forgotten what the problem was..........homeschooling is so common now that the social objections are irrelevant.

Tell me about your senior prom.


You make my point. That isn't socialization. That's whoring your daughters out.

That's why my sisters went to uber conservative school that didn't have dances.

Link Posted: 3/19/2013 9:15:12 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 9:15:55 AM EDT
I have 3 kids in Classical Conversations. The curriculum is tough, but it is what they are used to. History from the ancient civilizations, they are just getting to the Roman Republic, to the writing assignments that are more in depth than what I did in college. I was a science guy. Wish I had gotten to do this stuff when I was their age. And yes at this time of year we spend a lot of time at the baseball field, all play sports and when we have free time we fish and hunt. It is the way to go.

Try it, you may like it too.
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 9:18:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/19/2013 9:19:36 AM EDT by BSWilson]
Biggest no-shit investment in my kids education:

iPad Mini


The amount of high-quality educational content is staggering. I mean truly staggering. It's interesting, well made, and my kids take to it. They also have a thing where they're partnering with major universities and offering their classes & content for free as well, so it offers more than apps reinforcing K-12 curriculum (which it does so well), but whole curriculum on software development, physics, photography, or any of a number of other interesting and worthwhile subjects that I would like to cram into their little heads in a manner not unlike learning kung-fu in the matrix.


I'm sure most of this will trickle over to Android, in time, but right now that little $300 device offers greater depth and breadth of education, dollar for dollar, than anything else available.



Can't contribute on classical schools though, sorry.
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 9:19:44 AM EDT
i was rereading a John Adams biography recently and it pointed out that his children were were reading Roman and Greek philosophers (in the original Latin and Ancient Greek) by their mid-teens. thats the kind of education i wish i had...
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 9:35:00 AM EDT
Originally Posted By MRW:
Montessori is the anti-classical. Classical schooling is curriculum based and assumes there is a set curriculum that students should learn, including the seven liberal arts of grammar, logic, rhetoric, mathematics, music, geometry, and astronomy (now expanded to all physical sciences), and seeks to train the student to think and reason, not just memorize and mimic. The end goal of most classical schools is to teach students how to learn, rather than merely job-train them. this basic model of education traces its roots clear back to the ancient Greeks, and is called Liberal Arts because it was the education of free men, or education that makes one free, as opposed to a slave who only has to be trained to do a particular job. (servile arts)
There are different styles of classical education, so do some research. See my sig line.

Montessori is the "progressive" approach to education that is student based. The kids explore what interests them and choose for themselves what they will learn.

Do you let your 5 year old decide what he will eat for dinner, or do you choose for him or allow him to choose from several options because you know what makes for a healthy human? Your answer will determine which education system you prefer.



If you are interested in homeschooling, look up "classical conversations" in your area.

<-- classical HS teacher


Thanks, you described the big issue I had with Montessori. Lil Bear did not choose any math at school, therefore we had to teach her at home.
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 10:00:58 AM EDT
Originally Posted By BSWilson:
Biggest no-shit investment in my kids education:

iPad Mini


The amount of high-quality educational content is staggering. I mean truly staggering. It's interesting, well made, and my kids take to it. They also have a thing where they're partnering with major universities and offering their classes & content for free as well, so it offers more than apps reinforcing K-12 curriculum (which it does so well), but whole curriculum on software development, physics, photography, or any of a number of other interesting and worthwhile subjects that I would like to cram into their little heads in a manner not unlike learning kung-fu in the matrix.


I'm sure most of this will trickle over to Android, in time, but right now that little $300 device offers greater depth and breadth of education, dollar for dollar, than anything else available.



Can't contribute on classical schools though, sorry.


The level of education available through the iTunes U app is amazing. World class schools, such at MIT, have placed their curricula on line for open access. There is something in every subject to suit all levels of education.
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 10:16:11 AM EDT
My kids are in a similar program called "Classical Conversations". It's a Christian program but focuses on "the trivium" which from my understanding is the basis of classical education. Grammar, logic and rhetoric. Learn your vocabulary so that you can formulate full thoughts, then learn to logically process information, and then learn how to present/defend/debate your beliefs so that you can better understand them.

They go one day a week and are homeschooled the rest. They really like it, and they get plenty of group interaction both on school days, and the mothers have get togethers/play dates through the week. Plus they have friends in church (the school program is not affiliated with the chruch we go to. Plus, at least in my county, home schooled kids are eligible to participate in the sports andextracurricular activites that the public school system offers, if they choose to.
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 10:21:56 AM EDT
The Jesuits are your best bet for the Classics.
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 10:22:30 AM EDT
Or you could move to a place with good public schools, might not be realistic depending on locale
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 10:25:30 AM EDT
Originally Posted By TheFreepster:
Or you could move to a place with good public schools, might not be realistic depending on locale


No many publics schools going the route of Latin and Ancient Greek during grade school, these days.

Link Posted: 3/19/2013 10:36:56 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Cincinnatus:
Originally Posted By TheFreepster:
Or you could move to a place with good public schools, might not be realistic depending on locale


No many publics schools going the route of Latin and Ancient Greek during grade school, these days.



Mine did Latin back in the day but that was a while ago
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 10:56:48 AM EDT
Originally Posted By MRW:
Montessori is the anti-classical. Classical schooling is curriculum based and assumes there is a set curriculum that students should learn, including the seven liberal arts of grammar, logic, rhetoric, mathematics, music, geometry, and astronomy (now expanded to all physical sciences), and seeks to train the student to think and reason, not just memorize and mimic. The end goal of most classical schools is to teach students how to learn, rather than merely job-train them. this basic model of education traces its roots clear back to the ancient Greeks, and is called Liberal Arts because it was the education of free men, or education that makes one free, as opposed to a slave who only has to be trained to do a particular job. (servile arts)
There are different styles of classical education, so do some research. See my sig line.

Montessori is the "progressive" approach to education that is student based. The kids explore what interests them and choose for themselves what they will learn.

Do you let your 5 year old decide what he will eat for dinner, or do you choose for him or allow him to choose from several options because you know what makes for a healthy human? Your answer will determine which education system you prefer.



If you are interested in homeschooling, look up "classical conversations" in your area.

<-- classical HS teacher


+1

In before the Liberal Arts haters.
Link Posted: 3/19/2013 12:31:38 PM EDT
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