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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 1/26/2006 6:43:58 PM EDT
Does anyone else here have a taste for classical music?
I find it is great for relaxing or studying. I wanted to se if any of you could recomend some good pieces... I don't just want the names of composers, i'd like to find actual pieces. Thanks.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 6:45:28 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2006 10:40:24 AM EDT by Greenhorn]
That's all I listen to. But not for relaxing. I find most classical period music boring. I like listening to deeper music, like that of the later classical composers such as Lizst, Rimski-Korsakov, Brahms, etc. I listen to tons of that stuff, and write in that style too.

Anything I suggested probably would not help you study. Some of my favorites are:

Brahms, Symphony no. 4
Lizst, Les Preludes
Rimski-Korsakov, Scheherazade
Holst, The Planets
Debussy, La Mer
Berlioz, Symphony Fantastique
Stravinski, The Rite of Spring
Saint-Saens, Organ Symphony no. 3
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 6:47:31 PM EDT
I turn it on if I feel the need to catch a nap, or if I'm driving around and there's nothing on the radio.

Link Posted: 1/26/2006 6:49:31 PM EDT
What's good? Anything by Mozart.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 6:50:11 PM EDT
Wager "Death of Arthur" and surrounding pieces.

Also...

Beethoven "Moonlight Sonet" and surrounding pieces...

then I would suggest Tcaikpovsy but he can get a sleepy...
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 6:54:02 PM EDT
Hrm.

I like Hans Zimmer.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 6:58:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/26/2006 7:01:24 PM EDT by Pangea]
"Duettino - Sull'aria"
from opera "Le nozze di Figaro (The Marriage of Figaro)"
Composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte (uncredited)
Performed by Edith Mathis and Gundula Janowitz (uncredited)
Chor und Orchester der Deutschen Oper Berlin
Conducted by Karl Böhm
Courtesy of Duetsche Grammophon, by arraingement with PolyGram Special Markets

------- as heard in The Shawshank Redemption. That is the only classical song that I like. It's awsome.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 7:21:25 PM EDT
I always liked the easily recognizable stuff like

(MY SPELLING OF COMPOSERS AND THEIR WORKS SUCK)

Mozart "Eine Kleine Nacht Musik" or Symphony No. 40

Mahler's 3rd or 5th.

Bethoven's 9th, and I like the 3rd too.

Holst (As mentioned above)

Check out a modern composer by the name of Vaughn Williams. He did a piece called "The Lark Ascending" that I love. Kinda sounds asian woodwinds meets waves of strings.

My suggestion is make the move over to opera and let a couple of Arias take you away.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 7:25:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By atomicferret:
Does anyone else here have a taste for classical music?
I find it is great for relaxing or studying. I wanted to se if any of you could recomend some good pieces... I don't just want the names of composers, i'd like to find actual pieces. Thanks.



Yes I love classical music. I've spent most of my youth performing it.

I like just about everything, but Beethoven really stands out for me. Listen to his 3rd, 5th, 6th, and 9th Symphonies. They are really great.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 7:29:56 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/26/2006 7:31:07 PM EDT by nfleming]
Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Handel. Pachelbel are my favorites. I listen to it everynight before I go to sleep, and I listen to it alot when I get done with a lot of drinking and want to have a couple more drinks before I turn in. I used to play saxophone, and kinda still do, and thats where I got my appreciation for it.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 7:30:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/26/2006 7:32:48 PM EDT by Tomislav]
Check out some Aaron Copland. If you have seen any decent Westerns, you've already heard his stuff.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 7:32:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2006 10:39:15 AM EDT by GunLogic]
Here's a good website to learn what's what and who's who in classical music. It includes nearly 200 excerpts to listen to through Real Audio.

Essentials of Music

I'm running short on time now, but maybe I'll add more to this entry later.

GL

Edit: see next page
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 7:35:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Pangea:
"Duettino - Sull'aria"
from opera "Le nozze di Figaro (The Marriage of Figaro)"
Composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte (uncredited)
Performed by Edith Mathis and Gundula Janowitz (uncredited)
Chor und Orchester der Deutschen Oper Berlin
Conducted by Karl Böhm
Courtesy of Duetsche Grammophon, by arraingement with PolyGram Special Markets

------- as heard in The Shawshank Redemption. That is the only classical song that I like. It's awsome.



I buyed that exact recording by accident. I was buying a highlights CD of Figaro.

Go watch

Amadeus
and see if ya like the music.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 7:38:51 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/26/2006 7:41:01 PM EDT by 4v50]
Schubert's, "The Trout"
Beethoven's "Concerto for piano, chorus and orchestra in A-minor" or "Choral Fantasy".
Rossini's, "La Donna mobile" from his opera, Rigoletto (google the lyrics and see the translation).
Verdi's, "Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves" from Nabucco (Nebekenezer - sp).
Verdi's, "Triumphal March" from Aida.
Mozart, "Rhondo ala Turko" (if I gawt the nayme rite).
Respigi, "The Birds"
Handel, "Royal Fireworks Suite" and "Watermusic"
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 7:40:27 PM EDT
Ralph Vaughan Williams -

Symphony #2 - "London"
Symphony # 7 - "Antartica" (I know that is misspelled, that is how he wrote it)
"The Lark Ascending"
"An Oxford Elegy"
"Flos Campi"

Paul Hindemith -
"Ludus Tonalis"
"Symphonic Metamorphosis"*
"Mathis der Maler"**

Carl Orff -
"Carmina Burana"

Benjamin Britten -
"Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra"

Sergei Rachmaninoff -
Piano Concerto #1, #2, #3

Johann Sebastian Bach -
"Goldberg Variations"
"The Art of the Fugue"

Wolfgang Mozart -
"Bassoon Concerto"
"Requiem"

Sergei Prokofiev -
"Romeo and Juliet"

Just to name a few.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 8:40:51 PM EDT
I've developed a taste of classical music over the years mainly because as I got older, the rock & roll just became too dissonant. I like most any composers, I just tune in to the 105.1 KMZT-Los Angeles(K-Mozart) on the old over-the-air radio. They stream on the internet also, but it takes up bandwidth so I don't.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 8:51:41 PM EDT
Listen to it while driving alot.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 9:24:13 PM EDT
John Dowland: Complete Lute Works, Paul O'dette, lute
Michael Praetorius: Dances from Terpsichore
The Artistry of Christopher Parkening (classical guitar)
J.S. Bach: Julian Bream (classical guitar)
Saint-Saens: Symphony #3 "Organ Symphony"
Most pieces composed by Maurice Ravel, Claude Debussy, Erik Satie, Alexander Boradin (sp) (did some beautiful melodic stuff). Way too many to think of/list.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 9:26:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2006 7:03:58 AM EDT by pv74]
I like the Baroque era...

I particularly like organ pieces by Bach and other composers.

The pipe organ is a magical instrument...

Try the classical music archives...

You can download a TON of music for $25 a year.

www.classicalarchives.com/

These are nice and short little pieces by Bach...

Prelude and Fugue in C, BWV553

This is a very famous piece...

Fugue in G-, BWV578 ('Little Fugue')

Link Posted: 1/26/2006 9:33:52 PM EDT
I'll recommend Beethoven's Violin Concerto in D maj, Op. 61:
1st movement - Allegro ma non troppo
2nd movement - Larghetto
3rd movement - Rondo

This is usually followed (on a cd) by two more pieces: Romance in F, and Romance in F Andante
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 9:48:03 PM EDT
I'll just echo a couple other posters

Carmina Burana

Goldberg Variations

Horowitz' 1957 performance of Rachmaninov's Piano Concerto #3. THis one's a doozy. There was a movie made about it.

Beethoven's Symphony #5

Honestly, I think that if you picked up a copy of any of these pieces you would very likely enjoy them quite a bit. I'd personally rank them as follows.

Goldberg variations, Rocky 3, Carmina Burana, and Beethoven 5. They're all great though and you could probably get them at your local library.

Carmina Burana is the theme music to the last Dracula movie. It's hot.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 10:20:06 PM EDT
I really like the Russian composer (The Russian 5)

Rimsky-Korsakov, Glinka, Mussorgsky (The Great Gate of Kiev),
Rachmanioff.

Of course, you'll have to get Samual Barber's "Adagio for Strings" (The song in Platoon) and Albinoni's "Adagio for Organ and Strings" (song in the movie Gallipoli)
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 10:31:20 PM EDT
I like mozart beethoven and vivaldi the most. I also like phillip glass, who isn't dead yet and I don't know if technically he is considered classical.

I find I cannot listen to classical music and sleep, it seems to exite me or something, it's just so intense, I can't not listen to it, as in have it be background music. On the other hand it's not something I exercise to either. I have listened to it while riding my bicycle though.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 10:53:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By guardian855:
I really like the Russian composer (The Russian 5)

Rimsky-Korsakov, Glinka, Mussorgsky (The Great Gate of Kiev),
Rachmanioff.

Of course, you'll have to get Samual Barber's "Adagio for Strings" (The song in Platoon) and Albinoni's "Adagio for Organ and Strings" (song in the movie Gallipoli)



That's only 4 my brother...for a free CD, who's your number five?! For a second CD...tell me who The Five (or Могучая кучка - Mighty Handful) correctly are! You might as well cheat and use the web....the offer is still good.


Originally Posted By atomicferret:
Does anyone else here have a taste for classical music?
I find it is great for relaxing or studying. I wanted to se if any of you could recomend some good pieces... I don't just want the names of composers, i'd like to find actual pieces. Thanks.



Man, if it's relaxing you want then go with most "classical" composers. Pick up the soundtrack to Amadeus and go from there. Get the Platoon soundtrack (as mentioned above)....or better yet the soundtrack to Lorenzo's Oil. You'll be good to go.

For a little more pizzaz look into the "romantic" composers. Beethoven is the meat and potatoes here. Brahms is also very good. Mahler in underappreciated. I know you didn't just want names, but pick up a "best of" cd and you'll open new doors. Or go by the soundtracks to Fantasia and Fantasia 2000.....see what you like and go from there.

And if you're super curious and have time on your hands, go take one of those general music courses at the local community college. You'll get your fill.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 11:00:22 PM EDT
I throw some classical into the mix when I feel like it. Its very relaxing.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 5:17:12 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2006 6:31:37 AM EDT by guardian855]

Originally Posted By Ocorvo:

Originally Posted By guardian855:
I really like the Russian composers (The Russian 5)

Rimsky-Korsakov, Glinka, Mussorgsky (The Great Gate of Kiev),
Rachmanioff.

Of course, you'll have to get Samual Barber's "Adagio for Strings" (The song in Platoon) and Albinoni's "Adagio for Organ and Strings" (song in the movie Gallipoli)



That's only 4 my brother...for a free CD, who's your number five?! For a second CD...tell me who The Five (or Могучая кучка - Mighty Handful) correctly are! You might as well cheat and use the web....the offer is still good.


Well, of course there is the father of russian music, Piotr Ilyitch Tchaikovsky, but I always found he was just ok. He wrote more like a European than a Russian, but sometimes you could hear his Russian side (1812 Overture, some sections of his Serenade For Strings)

As far as the Russian 5, I used to know this. Rimsky-Korsakov, and I believe his two students, Prokoiev (can't spell it) and Mussorsky (and that's without using the web). Doh, I was wrong about Prokoiev (although he was a student of R-K) and it was Borodin (good music, especially for the cello), Balakriev (not familiar with his work), Cui (not familiar with his work), Musorosky, and R-K. Tchaikovsky is widely considered the "sixth member of the five" but I don't agree with that, he had a different style.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 5:47:06 AM EDT
Mozart (Happy Birthday Wolfgang!)

Liszt (Les Preludes)

Beethoven (All of his symphonies)

Puccini operas...especially La Boheme and Turandot

Tchaikovsky (Pick your poison)

Vivaldi's The Four Seasons

Modest Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition...especially the "Great Gates of Kiev"

Bolero by Maurice Ravel

J. S. Bach is very good too...just pick anything...

The best orchestra and composer are the Berliner Philharmonic under the direction of Herbert von Karajan. He's long dead...but you can find their magic under the Duetsche Gramophone label.


Link Posted: 1/27/2006 6:05:38 AM EDT
All LV Beethovens Symphs.
Mozarts "Requeum" while at the reloading bench. (Also Dvoraks' 6th symph)
Try Dvoraks "Symphony from the New World" first. It was inspired by a tour of these United States, & it shows!
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 6:11:57 AM EDT

Originally Posted By LWilde:
Mozart (Happy Birthday Wolfgang!)

Beat me too it!

Link Posted: 1/27/2006 6:24:41 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2006 6:37:54 AM EDT by Greenhorn]

Originally Posted By c130montana:
All LV Beethovens Symphs.



Beethoven wrote 55 symphonies?
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 6:26:22 AM EDT
Yep
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 7:06:35 AM EDT
Forgot to add, I also much of the symphonic written by Alan Havonas, and there was another guy who used to be in rock band, but now is writing symphonies.

Today is Mozart's 250th birthday.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 8:41:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By guardian855:

Originally Posted By Ocorvo:

Originally Posted By guardian855:
I really like the Russian composers (The Russian 5)

Rimsky-Korsakov, Glinka, Mussorgsky (The Great Gate of Kiev),
Rachmanioff.

Of course, you'll have to get Samual Barber's "Adagio for Strings" (The song in Platoon) and Albinoni's "Adagio for Organ and Strings" (song in the movie Gallipoli)



That's only 4 my brother...for a free CD, who's your number five?! For a second CD...tell me who The Five (or Могучая кучка - Mighty Handful) correctly are! You might as well cheat and use the web....the offer is still good.


Well, of course there is the father of russian music, Piotr Ilyitch Tchaikovsky, but I always found he was just ok. He wrote more like a European than a Russian, but sometimes you could hear his Russian side (1812 Overture, some sections of his Serenade For Strings)

As far as the Russian 5, I used to know this. Rimsky-Korsakov, and I believe his two students, Prokoiev (can't spell it) and Mussorsky (and that's without using the web). Doh, I was wrong about Prokoiev (although he was a student of R-K) and it was Borodin (good music, especially for the cello), Balakriev (not familiar with his work), Cui (not familiar with his work), Musorosky, and R-K. Tchaikovsky is widely considered the "sixth member of the five" but I don't agree with that, he had a different style.



Now, wasn't that fun? I agree with you about Tchaikovsky...not a huge fan. There is the popular stuff of his, and of course The Nutcracker every year just because. I like the other guys more. You need to check out Shostakovich. I'll throw a disc together for you.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 10:29:28 AM EDT
I like String Quartets.

Bartok, Alfred Schnitte, Charles Ives, Samuel Barber, Shostakovitch, Eliot Carter, Verdi, Sibelius, Saint-Saens, Faure, Ravel, Debussy, Mozart, Beethoven, Philip Glass, Ned Rorem, Edgar Meyer, John Harbison, Richard Wernick, Gunther Schuller.

GL

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