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Posted: 9/27/2004 1:16:45 PM EST
Do you leave 'em in the wrapper or let 'em breathe?
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 1:21:02 PM EST

Originally Posted By RustyTX:
Do you leave 'em in the wrapper or let 'em breathe?



Should make no difference...the plastic wrappers on most cigars are loose enough to allow outside air in...keep your stogies around 70/70 and you'll be good to go...
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 1:24:36 PM EST
I keep mine wrapped............I have had no problems.
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 1:25:10 PM EST

Originally Posted By IamtheNRA:

Originally Posted By RustyTX:
Do you leave 'em in the wrapper or let 'em breathe?



Should make no difference...the plastic wrappers on most cigars are loose enough to allow outside air in...keep your stogies around 70/70 and you'll be good to go...




+1 but the most I see are not in plastic...
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 1:32:52 PM EST
Thanks men... In arfcom fashion I did BOTH. Some wrapped and top-shelf unwrapped.

How long will they keep (at 70%)?
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 1:36:19 PM EST
cellos on of course.

It helps keep the moisture IN the cigar, and also prevents the spread of the dreaded tobacco beetle in the event that you have one break out.
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 1:40:02 PM EST

Originally Posted By RustyTX:
How long will they keep (at 70%)?



at a stable 65F and 65-70% humidity the gars can keep for many years. I have some that are 10 and 15 years old...like fine wine they get better with age. Oh yea if you do store them for long durations- ensure that you have a very stable humidity and temp, or else you will get "swings" which can stress a cigar and can ruin good smokes.
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 1:41:25 PM EST

Originally Posted By gaspain:
cellos on of course.

It helps keep the moisture IN the cigar, and also prevents the spread of the dreaded tobacco beetle in the event that you have one break out.



Good point, dude...thanks!
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 1:43:54 PM EST

Originally Posted By IamtheNRA:

Originally Posted By gaspain:
cellos on of course.

It helps keep the moisture IN the cigar, and also prevents the spread of the dreaded tobacco beetle in the event that you have one break out.



Good point, dude...thanks!


Also keeps the unique flavor of the individual cigar to the individual cigar.
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 1:43:57 PM EST

Originally Posted By RustyTX:
Thanks men... In arfcom fashion I did BOTH. Some wrapped and top-shelf unwrapped.

How long will they keep (at 70%)?


At 70 % they will last at least a lifetime. Keeping cigars in cello is just personal preference.
Are you in Austin, by chance?
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 1:45:45 PM EST
whats the deal with "Brandy soaked cigars"? (terminology)?
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 1:48:00 PM EST

Originally Posted By twonami:
whats the deal with "Brandy soaked cigars"? (terminology)?



Those are usually cheap cigars with brandy flavor...not my cup o' tea...
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 1:52:30 PM EST
I've got to vote keep your humidor below 75 degrees and cigars unwrapped. The flavor mixing myth is way overated.....that is unless you are stupid enough to keep some candyassed flavored cigars in your humidor. JMHO of course.
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 2:42:02 PM EST

Originally Posted By Flushdraw:

Originally Posted By RustyTX:
Thanks men... In arfcom fashion I did BOTH. Some wrapped and top-shelf unwrapped.

How long will they keep (at 70%)?


At 70 % they will last at least a lifetime. Keeping cigars in cello is just personal preference.
Are you in Austin, by chance?



Negative. Nearer to Cowtown.
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 2:51:20 PM EST

True cigar aficionados know that keeping cigars in a real (Spanish cedar lined) humidor unwrapped lets them naturally age and become vintage. Smoother, sweeter, better tasting.

If you leave the plastic wrapper on them, they won't do that.

People pay big money for aged vintage cigars. But you can do the same thing yourself. If you buy good cigars and age them, they will become vintage. (and much better)

If you have relatively cheap cigars and a cheap humidor, and you smoke them pretty quickly, then leaving the wrapped may be the best idea.


Zen

"This is my cigar, there are many like it, but this one is aged properly"

Link Posted: 9/27/2004 5:26:01 PM EST
Amen. It won't really matter how you store a bad cigar.
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 5:35:35 PM EST
I just bought a brand new humidor, it was a private sale and did not come with instructions. How do I "break it in" ?
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 5:40:23 PM EST
Good cigars, distilled water.
Keep the humidity constant.

<­BR>


Bolivar Belicoso Fino..... I just like to say it.
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 5:41:33 PM EST

Originally Posted By MrClean4Hire:
I just bought a brand new humidor, it was a private sale and did not come with instructions. How do I "break it in" ?



I've never heard of a 'break in period' for humidors.

Just make sure it is properly humidified.

Most people make the big mistake of over humidifying their humidors.

It is better to have it a bit dryer than to moist.

Go to: cigaraficianado.com they have some good faqs about this sort of thing.

Enjoy your cigars!!!



Zen



<­BR>

"This is my rifle, there are many like it, but this one is mine"
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 5:47:07 PM EST
Unwrapped in the dry box, wrapped in the long term storage box.
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 5:54:56 PM EST
The general consensus of the cigar sites I frequent ( Cigar Utopia, Cigar Weekly and Cigar Aficionado) is that it really makes little to no difference. I've found I prefer to keep the cello on because I rearrange my stash somewhat frequently.

Look around at the sites I mentioned above, and you will find numerous debates on this subject, as well as others.

Jonathan

Link Posted: 9/27/2004 5:58:47 PM EST

Originally Posted By MrClean4Hire:
I just bought a brand new humidor, it was a private sale and did not come with instructions. How do I "break it in" ?



Fire 5 rounds clean the bore and fire 5 more. Clean again. do this for 4 times... Oops wrong break in.

I keep my unwrapped.
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 6:03:06 PM EST
... I prefer unwrapped

Link Posted: 9/27/2004 6:06:56 PM EST
I'd post some cigar porn but the wife may get PO'd if I post pics of cigars in the pie
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 6:12:05 PM EST
UNwrapped
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 6:15:44 PM EST
My overflow cooler the day before I got another one to ease the humidity control:



Jonathan
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 7:43:05 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/27/2004 7:58:32 PM EST by gaspain]

Originally Posted By ZEN:

Originally Posted By MrClean4Hire:
I just bought a brand new humidor, it was a private sale and did not come with instructions. How do I "break it in" ?



I've never heard of a 'break in period' for humidors.

Just make sure it is properly humidified.

Most people make the big mistake of over humidifying their humidors.

It is better to have it a bit dryer than to moist.

Go to: cigaraficianado.com they have some good faqs about this sort of thing.

Enjoy your cigars!!!



Zen



OMG! dont just throw the cigars in there without breaking it in!!!! The dry wood will suck the moisture right out of your precious cigars!!!! a dry cigar sux more ass than a porta potty



instead of the sponge, I use a couple of shot glasses filled with distilled water. Also dont season it too quickly with large glasses of water or you could warp the wood- making your box not close right- making air leak out- ruining the box. It is suposed to be a slow process and should take about a week of humidity at about 70% depending on the size of the idor, you should notice a visual difference in the wood too, instead of being a pale/dry color it will soak up the moisture and will give it a warmer/redish look to the spanish cedar. Use a good hydrometer that has been calibrated with a salt test to make sure you dont get the humidity too high(75+). Only use distilled water or you will grow mold and ruin the box forever. Do it right the first time and you wont have any troubles.

FYI google has several sites to tell you how to season humidors

follow this procedure taken from: http://www.uptowncigar.com
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SEASONING A PERSONAL HUMIDOR

Cigars, with their delicate balance of moisture, need to be stored properly. This is easy, low-tech,and important. Most cigars are made in the tropics, and the aim of "seasoning a humidor" is to try and recreate this tropical environment. It takes time, patience, and a little know-how to "season" or ready a new humidor, and the process cannot be rushed.

Most humidors have an interior made of untreated Spanish cedar, the preferred wood for humidifying and aging premium cigars. This wood needs to be humidified, or seasoned, before the box is ready to hold the cigars.

Take a new sponge, (make sure it is unscented and free of soap), and wet it with a liberal dose of distilled water. Wipe down all the exposed wood, including any trays and dividers, and the interior lid. Avoid using a paper towel or a fraying cloth; these will literally leave a paper trail on the wood. After you've wiped down the wood, squirt the sponge with more distilled water, then place it inside the humidor on a plastic bag- to avoid direct contact with the wood- and close the lid.

Next, prepare your humidification device according to the manufacturer's instructions. Unless the manufacturer specifically states that you can use tap water, use only distilled water. (Tap water contains minerals that will destroy most humidification systems by leaving deposits that will clog the humidor element.) Once the humidification element is filled, be sure to wipe it down to remove all the excess water. Rest it on a hand towel for approximately 30 minutes.

Close the humidor with its humidifying element and the damp sponge, and leave it overnight. The next day, refresh the humidification device (it may not need it), and check the sponge. If it is fairly dry, add more distilled water. If it is very damp, leave it alone.

Let the humidor sit another night, and then remove the sponge and plastic bag. The walls of the humidor have now absorbed all the water they need, and now you can safely store your cigars.

Check your hygrometer daily. If the humidity is too high (optimum range is 65% to 75% Relative Humidity), simply open the lid for a short time. If it is too low, add more distilled water to the humidification unit. Occasionally, a damp sponge may need to be left inside for another day. Make sure it is on plastic and doesn't touch either the wood or cigars. You may even wish to remove your cigars and store them in a ziploc bag with a DHS while you do this. Most humidification units will need to be refilled with distilled water about once a month, and recharged with recharging solution about twice a year.

It is recommended that you rotate your cigars both side to side and top to bottom. If you store cigars on top of one another, it is advised to place a thin straw between them to keep the air and moisture even.

Enjoy!
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 2:00:48 PM EST
Thanks for the info all... What's your favorite online source? I've been using www.thompsoncigar.com but I know there must be some more good ones out there (tried and true).

This cigar stuff can get just like colt vs bushmaster or 1911 vs glock
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 2:06:54 PM EST

Originally Posted By RustyTX:
Thanks for the info all... What's your favorite online source? I've been using www.thompsoncigar.com but I know there must be some more good ones out there (tried and true).

This cigar stuff can get just like colt vs bushmaster or 1911 vs glock



AHHHHH! You said the T-WORD

Just busting your balls. They're overpriced by miles for what they sell. Try a couple of the following:
JR Cigars
Lil' Brown Smoke Shack
Cigarbid which is a clearing house for Cigars International
Paradise Cigars (Website not fully functional yet)
And the ubiquitous Mr. Bundles

Hope that's a good start for you. Cigar Utopia also has a pretty big list of retailers.

Jonathan
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 2:08:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/28/2004 2:13:14 PM EST by gaspain]

Originally Posted By RustyTX:
Thanks for the info all... What's your favorite online source? I've been using www.thompsoncigar.com but I know there must be some more good ones out there (tried and true).

This cigar stuff can get just like colt vs bushmaster or 1911 vs glock



I like:

cigarinternational.com 5stars
cigarbid.com 5stars
lilbrown.com 5stars

ive heard jrcigars.com is good, but never ordered from them. I dont care for thompsons, I just dont like all their generic house brands- but thats just me. If you are new to gars, try some of these favs of mine

La Gloria Cubana Serie R #5
Any Arturo Fuente
Any Camacho
red band(not black and gold) Romeo y Julieta
Rocky Patel
Montecristo
Partagas
Torano Exodus 1959/1916
Hoyo De Monterry Excaliber
Punch
Onyx
Industrial Press
puros indios

also there is lots of previous posts in the search about cigars, and keep us posted on any new gars you try out

enjoy!

Link Posted: 9/28/2004 2:10:50 PM EST

Originally Posted By Winston_Wolf:
... I prefer unwrapped

members.cox.net/winston_wolf/cig1.jpg



mmmm cohiba
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 3:41:15 PM EST
Super cool. Thanks for the links.

I actually tried one of the thompson brand samplers because I was skeptical too and my favorite taste so far is one of theirs (dark maduro frisco). I'm sure I can find a snobby, expensive brand that tastes the same though. Gotta keep up appearances you know
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 3:46:36 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/28/2004 3:48:47 PM EST by GLOCKshooter]
I leave mine in the wrappers because I usually grab a few and stick them in my suit pocket to smoke later. I smoke relatively few straight out of the humidor.

If you like maduros, you may want to try Macanudo Maduro, CAO Aniversary, Hoyo Dark Sumatra. Those three are my current favorites. I liked Partegas Black Label, but got a few with bad draw, and haven't been back since.
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 3:59:28 PM EST
I prefer unwrapped.
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 4:01:40 PM EST
I actually think it's a good thing you like the Thompson's. It's a good thing because as you try new cigars, you'll find ones you like better and better... then one day, you'll spark one of those Thompson's and realize that you don't really care for them any more. You'll then appreciate the better cigars more. Of course, you may find that the Thompson's are GREAT and for the price, you'll be happy with them. Taste IS subjective...

I would reccomend participating in a "Newbie Sampler Trade" on CU or CW. The premise is you set the price, a FOG (opposite of FNG) with a good trade record picks out an item. You purchase said item for FOG, and in turn the FOG sends you a sampler of good to great cigars that are worth more than the item you purchased. I did one and found a lot of reccomended brands that I don't particularly care for, and a lot of brands I hadn't heard of that turned out to be great smokes.

Jonathan
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 4:09:16 PM EST

Originally Posted By DsrtEgl50:
I actually think it's a good thing you like the Thompson's. It's a good thing because as you try new cigars, you'll find ones you like better and better... then one day, you'll spark one of those Thompson's and realize that you don't really care for them any more. You'll then appreciate the better cigars more. Of course, you may find that the Thompson's are GREAT and for the price, you'll be happy with them. Taste IS subjective...




I know what you're saying. Its kind of like my choice in anything I guess. I can appreciate most import and home brew beers and sometimes they are just what I want, but most days I drink Bud



Thanks for the suggestions Glockshooter. I'll give them a try...
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