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Posted: 4/19/2007 6:44:47 PM EDT
No link up yet, just the tease:

"WE ARE GLAD HE IS DEAD: The grandad of university mass killer Cho Seung-Hui said tonight: 'Son of a bitch. He deserved to die'... "

Update:

Well, this is all there is to the story:

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/topstories/tm_headline=we-are-glad-he-is-dead-by-cho-s-family--&method=full&objectid=18931479&siteid=89520-name_page.html
SON OF A BITCH
EXCLUSIVE: Grandad's anger at uni murderer
Graham Brough In South Korea 20/04/2007

THE grandfather of Cho Seung-Hui said yesterday: "Son of a bitch. It serves him right he died with his victims."

Kim Hyang-Sik, 82, said he had a doom-laden dream of Cho's parents the night of his murderous rampage - and woke to hear the news of the massacre and his grandson's death.

He watched Cho's sick video of himself holding a gun to his head.

His sister Kim Yang-Sun, 85, who also saw it, told the Mirror that afterwards her brother was so distraught he had "gone away for a few days to calm himself down and avoid more questions".

She too repeatedly referred to the killer as "son of a bitch" or "a***hole" and said his mother Kim Hyang-Yim had problems with him from infancy.

Yang-Sun revealed the eight-year-old was diagnosed as autistic soon after his family emigrated to the US.

She said: "He was very quiet and only followed his mother and father around and when others called his name he just answered yes or no but never showed any feelings or motions.

"We started to worry that he was autistic - that was the big concern of his mother. He was even a loner as a child.

"Soon after they got to America his mother was so worried about his inability to talk she took him to hospital and he was diagnosed as autistic."

Yang-Sun spoke at her tiny one roomed shack inside a vinyl farm shelter in the Gohyang area of South Korea's capital Seoul.

The family had stayed there the night before they emigrated in 1992. Yang-Sun said Cho's mother had been reluctant to marry her older husband.

She said: "She had five brothers and sisters and she was the second eldest child. She took care of them after she graduated from high school, which meant a lot of self-sacrifice.

"Hyang-Yim was a full-time house person on one of her parents' small farms outside Seoul. She stayed at home like that for years and was still single at home when she was 29.

"We became worried that she was spending too much time at home with her brothers and sisters and family and getting to old for a husband.

"So the family decided to force her into a blind date to find a husband. She met Cho Sung-Tae on that date. He was 10 years older at 39 and still single too. They decided to get married soon after that.

"She didn't want to but her family insisted because we thought she was getting past the right age and it would be good for her.

"Her husband was very serious and quiet and careful with money. He was not very sociable and not very friendly to his mother-in-law and father-in-law.

"After they were married he went away twice to Saudi Arabia in the 80s to try to make some money in the construction boom. He came back with about £2,000, which was enough to buy a small house in Seoul. He also ran a second-hand bookstore. His mother was living in the States on a long term visit to stay with his sister. She asked him to bring his family to live there.

"His sold the house to pay for the emigration costs and rented instead but there were lots of delays and eventually the whole process to get the permissions and organise things took eight years.

"By that time the money from the house was nearly gone. They were barely making ends meet so they had nothing to lose and had this idea of the American dream where there was a lot of money to be made."

She went on: "The reaction of my brother was that Seung-Hui was a troublemaker and it served him right that he died because he caused his mother a lot of problems. He was more worried about his daughter.

"He spoke to a few reporters to express sympathy to victims' families on behalf of our family but now he has gone away. He is 82 and lives quietly on a small farm and all this is too much for him."

Other relatives admitted Cho's parents had always been aware of his problems but had neither the time nor money for specialist help.

His uncle Chan Kim, 56, said: "He wasn't like a normal kid. We were worried about him not talking.

"Both his parents knew he had mental problems but they were poor and they couldn't send him to a special hospital in the United States.

"His mother and sister were asking his friends to help instead.

"His parents worked and did not have time to look after his condition and didn't give him special treatment.

"They had no time or money to look after his special problem even though they knew he was autistic."

Link Posted: 4/19/2007 6:45:26 PM EDT
[#1]
ouchie wa wa.
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 6:46:26 PM EDT
[#2]
Link!

Link Posted: 4/19/2007 6:47:39 PM EDT
[#3]
He's a discrace to the family.

Link Posted: 4/19/2007 6:58:37 PM EDT
[#4]

Quoted:
Link!



No link yet -sometimes he gets tips on upcoming news stories and posts the tease first and follows up with the link an  hour or two later.
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 6:58:45 PM EDT
[#5]
son of a bitch?  
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 7:00:02 PM EDT
[#6]

Quoted:
son of a bitch?  


maybe he's the paternale not maternal grandfather
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 7:00:28 PM EDT
[#7]

Quoted:
son of a bitch?  


I guess he didn't like his wife either.

eta: I can't read, I'm stupid.
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 7:00:45 PM EDT
[#8]
Orientals take honor very seriously.  Cho brought shame upon the family, and there is no greater infraction in their culture than disgracing the family.
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 7:06:33 PM EDT
[#9]
I hope Cho is sucking cock in hell right now.
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 7:14:54 PM EDT
[#10]
U.S. Shooter Troubled Parents As Kid

Thursday, April 19, 2007

 www.townhall.com/News/NewsArticle.aspx?contentGUID=46b58986-81c6-4824-bbf2-6f9223dd709e

The shooter in the Virginia Tech massacre had troubled his parents as a child because of speech difficulties, a newspaper reported Thursday.

Cho Seung-hui left South Korea with his family in 1992 to seek a better life in the United States, Cho's grandfather told the Dong-a Ilbo daily. Cho killed himself and 32 others at Virginia Tech in the deadliest shooting rampage in U.S. history.



South Korean citizens participate in a candlelight vigil for the victims of the Virginia Tech shooting massacre in Blacksburg, Va., in front of Seoul City Hall Wednesday, April 18, 2007. South Korea expressed shock after learning that the suspect in a shooting rampage at Virginia Tech university in the United States was a South Korean native, and said it hoped the tragedy would not incite racial hatred. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon) Relatives said they had minimal contact with the family after they left South Korea.

"How could he have done such a thing if he had any sympathy for his parents, who went all the way to another country because they couldn't make ends meet and endured hardships," Cho's maternal grandfather, identified only by his last name Kim, was quoted as saying.

The 81-year-old Kim said Cho "troubled his parents a lot when he was young because he couldn't speak well, but was well-behaved," the report said.

Kim said he had little communication with Cho's family after they left for the U.S.

Cho's uncle _ his mother's younger brother _ also told the newspaper that he was unaware of how Cho's family was doing.

"I don't even know my sister's phone number," the uncle said, adding he last talked to Cho's mother in October, the report said.

"Before she emigrated in 1992, she told me she was leaving for her childrens' education. Since she emigrated, I haven't seen her for nearly 15 years," the uncle _ also identified by just his last name Kim _ was quoted as saying.

Meanwhile, South Koreans mourned the deaths of those killed in the Virginia Tech shootings at a special church service Thursday, some fighting back tears from the guilt that a fellow South Korean was responsible for the massacre.

About 130 people gathered at Myeongdong Cathedral in central Seoul, casting their heads low as they sang sad hymns and prayed for the souls of those killed. A small table adorned with white flowers, candles and a U.S. flag was set up in the center of the chapel in memory of the victims.

"As a mother myself, my heart really aches as if it happened to my own children," said Bang Myung-lan, a 48-year-old housewife, holding back tears. "As a Korean, I am deeply sorry for the deceased."

"Among the 32 killed were bright students who could have contributed greatly to society, and it's a big loss for all of us," Cardinal Nicolas Cheong Jin-suk told parishioners. "As a South Korean, I can't help feeling apologetic about how a Korean man caused such a shocking incident."

The cardinal said everyone should work together to prevent a recurrence of "such an unfortunate event."

"It is beyond my understanding how such a thing can occur _ especially to think a Korean is responsible for this," said 68-year-old Lee Chun-ja after the service. "It really tears my heart. Something like this should never happen again."


Link Posted: 4/19/2007 7:15:38 PM EDT
[#11]

Quoted:
Orientals take honor very seriously.  Cho brought shame upon the family, and there is no greater infraction in their culture than disgracing the family.


Link Posted: 4/19/2007 7:18:17 PM EDT
[#12]

Quoted:
Orientals take honor very seriously.  Cho brought shame upon the family, and there is no greater infraction in their culture than disgracing the family.

For a person to commit such a heinous crime, I would like to in any culture.  
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 7:19:08 PM EDT
[#13]

Quoted:

Quoted:
Orientals take honor very seriously.  Cho brought shame upon the family, and there is no greater infraction in their culture than disgracing the family.




If you didn't know, most (aka, more than half) of asians are offended by that term thanks to its racist use wayyy back in the day, kind like how "chinamen" and "yellows" is also offensive.

The polite, and correct term for a general descriptor of people from Asia is "asian"

In other news, all asians hate Rosie O'Donnell.
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 7:19:39 PM EDT
[#14]

Quoted:

Quoted:
Orientals take honor very seriously.  Cho brought shame upon the family, and there is no greater infraction in their culture than disgracing the family.




He could've done a lot worse.
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 7:27:04 PM EDT
[#15]

Quoted:
Orientals take honor very seriously.  Cho brought shame upon the family, and there is no greater infraction in their culture than disgracing the family.


+1

Too fucking late, grandpa.
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 7:29:07 PM EDT
[#16]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
Orientals take honor very seriously.  Cho brought shame upon the family, and there is no greater infraction in their culture than disgracing the family.




If you didn't know, most (aka, more than half) of asians are offended by that term thanks to its racist use wayyy back in the day, kind like how "chinamen" and "yellows" is also offensive.

The polite, and correct term for a general descriptor of people from Asia is "asian"

In other news, all asians hate Rosie O'Donnell.


Offensive, maybe to some, but it is more accurate than saying Asian - you know, like those folks from Russia or India, or even the ones from Bangladesh.

Some just want to be offended.
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 7:29:41 PM EDT
[#17]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
Orientals take honor very seriously.  Cho brought shame upon the family, and there is no greater infraction in their culture than disgracing the family.




He could've done a lot worse.


i can think of 5 words he could have used that he would have had to edit his post or get bannzored.

obviously i wont say em but, i dont get how saying oriental is so bad.

Just to cover my ass.........

Rascists like Cityslicker need to burn!!!
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 7:31:40 PM EDT
[#18]
I always thought it was OK to use the term oriental as long as you didn't use a fake Chinese accent.
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 7:36:48 PM EDT
[#19]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
Orientals take honor very seriously.  Cho brought shame upon the family, and there is no greater infraction in their culture than disgracing the family.




He could've done a lot worse.


i can think of 5 words he could have used that he would have had to edit his post or get bannzored.

obviously i wont say em but, i dont get how saying oriental is so bad.


Ditto! For fuck's sake....
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 7:40:54 PM EDT
[#20]

Quoted:
I always thought it was OK to use the term oriental as long as you didn't use a fake Chinese accent.


Heck, I'm always out of the loop. I remember using the term 'japanimation' and got the weirdest look. I never knew it as anime. People just want EVERYTHING to be 'offensive' nowadays. I want to punch the idiot who invented PC. Wonder if he would be offended by it.
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 7:43:22 PM EDT
[#21]

Quoted:
I hope Cho is sucking cock in hell right now.


And receiving it at the same time... hopefully a great big barbed penis. I hope he is someones bitch.

Nothing says "I love you" than being ass-raped by a fiery cock for 1,000 years.  


/Yeah. I'm still bitter.

Link Posted: 4/19/2007 7:48:59 PM EDT
[#22]
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 7:53:24 PM EDT
[#23]

Quoted:

Quoted:
Orientals take honor very seriously.  Cho brought shame upon the family, and there is no greater infraction in their culture than disgracing the family.




Yeah, you know, as in a person from the Orient?
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 7:57:27 PM EDT
[#24]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
Orientals take honor very seriously.  Cho brought shame upon the family, and there is no greater infraction in their culture than disgracing the family.




If you didn't know, most (aka, more than half) of asians are offended by that term thanks to its racist use wayyy back in the day, kind like how "chinamen" and "yellows" is also offensive.

The polite, and correct term for a general descriptor of people from Asia is "asian"

In other news, all asians hate Rosie O'Donnell.


Someone please explain this to me.  It doesn't make any fucking sense whatsoever?  All it means is "Easterner."  Is this a buy-in to Edward Said's Orientalism?  If so it's total nonsense.   And why's it still OK for rugs and food?  

Any Oriental can feel free to refer to me as an Occidental and I promise I won't feel offended.
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 8:08:10 PM EDT
[#25]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
Orientals take honor very seriously.  Cho brought shame upon the family, and there is no greater infraction in their culture than disgracing the family.




Yeah, you know, as in a person from the Orient?


It's funny... threads come up on this every now and then.

I use "Oriental" instead of the latest PC fad term "Asian" mainly because it's more precise.  The media was saying the killer was Asian, and we were left wondering if he was Arab, Oriental, Indian, whatever.  

Some in the PC crowd try to make the claim that Oriental applies to inanimate objects but not people, but I've seen nothing to substantiate that.

Of course, the folks I know are Korean (or Chinese, Vietnamese, etc.) in terms of their anscestry, but if I don't know, and description is needed, I use Oriental.  The only place I've heard it's "not nice" is from a few here on arfcom.

But then again, I refer to myself as "white" and the black folks I know as "black," not "afro-American" or whatever the latest PC term is.  I'm a friendly guy, and like everybody, I'm just not too PC.


Link Posted: 4/19/2007 8:10:17 PM EDT
[#26]
o·ri·en·tal (ôr'ē-ĕn'tl, ōr'-) pronunciation
adj.

  1. often Oriental Of or relating to the countries of the Orient or their peoples or cultures; eastern.
  2. Oriental Of or designating the biogeographic region that includes Asia south of the Himalaya Mountains and the islands of the Malay Archipelago.
  3. Lustrous and valuable: oriental pearls.
  4.
        1. Of or relating to a genuine or superior gem: an oriental ruby.
        2. Relating to or designating corundum that resembles another stone in color.

n.

often Oriental Often Offensive. An Asian.
orientally o'ri·en'tal·ly adv.

USAGE NOTE   Asian is now strongly preferred in place of Oriental for persons native to Asia or descended from an Asian people. The usual objection to Oriental—meaning “eastern”—is that it identifies Asian countries and peoples in terms of their location relative to Europe. However, this objection is not generally made of other Eurocentric terms such as Near and Middle Eastern. The real problem with Oriental is more likely its connotations stemming from an earlier era when Europeans viewed the regions east of the Mediterranean as exotic lands full of romance and intrigue, the home of despotic empires and inscrutable customs. At the least these associations can give Oriental a dated feel, and as a noun in contemporary contexts (as in the first Oriental to be elected from the district) it is now widely taken to be offensive. However, Oriental should not be thought of as an ethnic slur to be avoided in all situations. As with Asiatic, its use other than as an ethnonym, in phrases such as Oriental cuisine or Oriental medicine, is not usually considered objectionable.
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 8:18:37 PM EDT
[#27]
I'm of Chinese descent. I never even knew the term "Oriental" could be considered offensive. Like other posters have said, it's just a more precise term than Asian.

Just PC bullshit that shouldn't bother anyone. Sort of like saying "African-American" instead of "black." I'm surprised nobody's renamed the United Negro College Fund.
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 8:22:10 PM EDT
[#28]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
Orientals take honor very seriously.  Cho brought shame upon the family, and there is no greater infraction in their culture than disgracing the family.




If you didn't know, most (aka, more than half) of asians are offended by that term thanks to its racist use wayyy back in the day, kind like how "chinamen" and "yellows" is also offensive.

The polite, and correct term for a general descriptor of people from Asia is "asian"

Oriental means someone from the Orient. Asian means someone from Asia, which means Orientals, or Arabs, or Turks, or Jews, or Indians, or Persians, or Slavs, or... well, you get the idea.

If someone is offended by it, they can fall off a cliff, just like the blacks who are offended by being called blacks. Unless of course I'm allowed to have a cow whenever someone refers to me as "white" and demand everyone begin referring to me more respectfully as a "Czech-German European-American."

Seriously.
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 8:22:43 PM EDT
[#29]

Quoted:
I always thought it was OK to use the term oriental as long as you didn't use a fake Chinese accent.


...owiental...


Link Posted: 4/19/2007 8:31:30 PM EDT
[#30]
I wouldn't mind if East Asian folks referred to me as an "occidental".
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 8:31:47 PM EDT
[#31]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
Orientals take honor very seriously.  Cho brought shame upon the family, and there is no greater infraction in their culture than disgracing the family.




Yeah, you know, as in a person from the Orient?



No shit... Who comes up with this PC crap ?!  I mean, really....  It's a word that was used forever and suddenly now, in the last couple years, it's racist ????

WTF ???  Who the fuck DECIDES this stuff ???  Does ANYONE know ???


Hell, I never heard it called racist and I'm only 38.  I remember it used in text books and everywhere else and nobody said squat back then... None of the Chinese, Japanese or Korean kids I went to school with ever seemed to be bothered by it.  

 This world is so fucking retarded sometimes.

Link Posted: 4/19/2007 8:36:44 PM EDT
[#32]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
Orientals take honor very seriously.  Cho brought shame upon the family, and there is no greater infraction in their culture than disgracing the family.




If you didn't know, most (aka, more than half) of asians are offended by that term thanks to its racist use wayyy back in the day, kind like how "chinamen" and "yellows" is also offensive.

The polite, and correct term for a general descriptor of people from Asia is "asian"

In other news, all asians hate Rosie O'Donnell.


I wish that were true.
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 8:45:54 PM EDT
[#33]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
Orientals take honor very seriously.  Cho brought shame upon the family, and there is no greater infraction in their culture than disgracing the family.




Yeah, you know, as in a person from the Orient?


It's funny... threads come up on this every now and then.

I use "Oriental" instead of the latest PC fad term "Asian" mainly because it's more precise.  The media was saying the killer was Asian, and we were left wondering if he was Arab, Oriental, Indian, whatever.  

Some in the PC crowd try to make the claim that Oriental applies to inanimate objects but not people, but I've seen nothing to substantiate that.

Of course, the folks I know are Korean (or Chinese, Vietnamese, etc.) in terms of their anscestry, but if I don't know, and description is needed, I use Oriental.  The only place I've heard it's "not nice" is from a few here on arfcom.

But then again, I refer to myself as "white" and the black folks I know as "black," not "afro-American" or whatever the latest PC term is.  I'm a friendly guy, and like everybody, I'm just not too PC.




oriental , would be like calling you a westerner.  its just weird, not bad, but just weird, no?
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 8:49:19 PM EDT
[#34]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
Orientals take honor very seriously.  Cho brought shame upon the family, and there is no greater infraction in their culture than disgracing the family.




Yeah, you know, as in a person from the Orient?


It's funny... threads come up on this every now and then.

I use "Oriental" instead of the latest PC fad term "Asian" mainly because it's more precise.  The media was saying the killer was Asian, and we were left wondering if he was Arab, Oriental, Indian, whatever.  

Some in the PC crowd try to make the claim that Oriental applies to inanimate objects but not people, but I've seen nothing to substantiate that.

Of course, the folks I know are Korean (or Chinese, Vietnamese, etc.) in terms of their anscestry, but if I don't know, and description is needed, I use Oriental.  The only place I've heard it's "not nice" is from a few here on arfcom.

But then again, I refer to myself as "white" and the black folks I know as "black," not "afro-American" or whatever the latest PC term is.  I'm a friendly guy, and like everybody, I'm just not too PC.




oriental , would be like calling you a westerner.  its just weird, not bad, but just weird, no?


Not really weird, people get called 'southerners' all the time.

Link Posted: 4/19/2007 8:53:05 PM EDT
[#35]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
Orientals take honor very seriously.  Cho brought shame upon the family, and there is no greater infraction in their culture than disgracing the family.




If you didn't know, most (aka, more than half) of asians are offended by that term thanks to its racist use wayyy back in the day, kind like how "chinamen" and "yellows" is also offensive.

The polite, and correct term for a general descriptor of people from Asia is "asian"


It's archaic is all. Like calling a black person negro, not racist, but weird.
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 9:01:55 PM EDT
[#36]

Quoted:

Quoted:
oriental , would be like calling you a westerner.  its just weird, not bad, but just weird, no?


Not really weird, people get called 'southerners' all the time.

It refers to where you're from, for pete's sake.

"You look European. You look like a westerner." Well, I damn well hope so, it's only where I'm from genetically! Seriously, how can you be offended by someone referring to the part of the world you're from? I can't see someone being offended by that unless they're secretly ashamed of their own heritage.
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 9:02:23 PM EDT
[#37]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
Orientals take honor very seriously.  Cho brought shame upon the family, and there is no greater infraction in their culture than disgracing the family.




If you didn't know, most (aka, more than half) of asians are offended by that term thanks to its racist use wayyy back in the day, kind like how "chinamen" and "yellows" is also offensive.

The polite, and correct term for a general descriptor of people from Asia is "asian"


It's archaic is all. Like calling a black person negro, not racist, but weird.


When? When did it become archaic?  I first hear this no more than two years ago.  Was it suddenly decreed archaic in 2005?  Who decided this?

It pisses me off to no end when I'm told that a word or turn of phrase I grew up using is no longer "socially acceptable" just because it isn't.  F that right in the neck.
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 9:05:00 PM EDT
[#38]
With a loving supportive family such as that, is it any wonder he turned out as he did?
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 9:09:33 PM EDT
[#39]

Quoted:
With a loving supportive family such as that, is it any wonder he turned out as he did?




Ever have a scumbag in your family? Did you guys do the Tammy Wynette for them?

I cant blame the Grandfather, I could easily see me saying, "If I had a half a clue he was that phuckt up, I would have killed him myself."

Link Posted: 4/19/2007 9:12:55 PM EDT
[#40]
CavVet.  I understand exactly what you are saying.

My family has a crazy member, and he's been cut.  He's violent, so he's not allowed to come around.
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 9:13:00 PM EDT
[#41]

Quoted:

Quoted:
With a loving supportive family such as that, is it any wonder he turned out as he did?




Ever have a scumbag in your family? Did you guys do the Tammy Wynette for them?

I cant blame the Grandfather, I could easily see me saying, "If I had a half a clue he was that phuckt up, I would have killed him myself."



He was diagnosed with autism, so he ruined his mother's life?

Is different than saying, they did the best they could raising him, and he still turned out like he did.

It sounds like the apple doesn't fall far from the tree.
Link Posted: 4/19/2007 9:19:48 PM EDT
[#42]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
oriental , would be like calling you a westerner.  its just weird, not bad, but just weird, no?


Not really weird, people get called 'southerners' all the time.

It refers to where you're from, for pete's sake.

"You look European. You look like a westerner." Well, I damn well hope so, it's only where I'm from genetically! Seriously, how can you be offended by someone referring to the part of the world you're from? I can't see someone being offended by that unless they're secretly ashamed of their own heritage.


heh Can this Racist get banned once and for all??? Seriously I take it very seriously when people start calling my european.

Thats an insult where i come from!
Link Posted: 4/20/2007 5:56:58 AM EDT
[#43]
Bump for full story

SON OF A BITCH
EXCLUSIVE: Grandad's anger at uni murderer
Graham Brough In South Korea 20/04/2007

THE grandfather of Cho Seung-Hui said yesterday: "Son of a bitch. It serves him right he died with his victims."

Kim Hyang-Sik, 82, said he had a doom-laden dream of Cho's parents the night of his murderous rampage - and woke to hear the news of the massacre and his grandson's death.

He watched Cho's sick video of himself holding a gun to his head.

His sister Kim Yang-Sun, 85, who also saw it, told the Mirror that afterwards her brother was so distraught he had "gone away for a few days to calm himself down and avoid more questions".

She too repeatedly referred to the killer as "son of a bitch" or "a***hole" and said his mother Kim Hyang-Yim had problems with him from infancy.

Yang-Sun revealed the eight-year-old was diagnosed as autistic soon after his family emigrated to the US.

She said: "He was very quiet and only followed his mother and father around and when others called his name he just answered yes or no but never showed any feelings or motions.

"We started to worry that he was autistic - that was the big concern of his mother. He was even a loner as a child.

"Soon after they got to America his mother was so worried about his inability to talk she took him to hospital and he was diagnosed as autistic."

Yang-Sun spoke at her tiny one roomed shack inside a vinyl farm shelter in the Gohyang area of South Korea's capital Seoul.

The family had stayed there the night before they emigrated in 1992. Yang-Sun said Cho's mother had been reluctant to marry her older husband.

She said: "She had five brothers and sisters and she was the second eldest child. She took care of them after she graduated from high school, which meant a lot of self-sacrifice.

"Hyang-Yim was a full-time house person on one of her parents' small farms outside Seoul. She stayed at home like that for years and was still single at home when she was 29.

"We became worried that she was spending too much time at home with her brothers and sisters and family and getting to old for a husband.

"So the family decided to force her into a blind date to find a husband. She met Cho Sung-Tae on that date. He was 10 years older at 39 and still single too. They decided to get married soon after that.

"She didn't want to but her family insisted because we thought she was getting past the right age and it would be good for her.

"Her husband was very serious and quiet and careful with money. He was not very sociable and not very friendly to his mother-in-law and father-in-law.

"After they were married he went away twice to Saudi Arabia in the 80s to try to make some money in the construction boom. He came back with about £2,000, which was enough to buy a small house in Seoul. He also ran a second-hand bookstore. His mother was living in the States on a long term visit to stay with his sister. She asked him to bring his family to live there.

"His sold the house to pay for the emigration costs and rented instead but there were lots of delays and eventually the whole process to get the permissions and organise things took eight years.

"By that time the money from the house was nearly gone. They were barely making ends meet so they had nothing to lose and had this idea of the American dream where there was a lot of money to be made."

She went on: "The reaction of my brother was that Seung-Hui was a troublemaker and it served him right that he died because he caused his mother a lot of problems. He was more worried about his daughter.

"He spoke to a few reporters to express sympathy to victims' families on behalf of our family but now he has gone away. He is 82 and lives quietly on a small farm and all this is too much for him."

Other relatives admitted Cho's parents had always been aware of his problems but had neither the time nor money for specialist help.

His uncle Chan Kim, 56, said: "He wasn't like a normal kid. We were worried about him not talking.

"Both his parents knew he had mental problems but they were poor and they couldn't send him to a special hospital in the United States.

"His mother and sister were asking his friends to help instead.

"His parents worked and did not have time to look after his condition and didn't give him special treatment.

"They had no time or money to look after his special problem even though they knew he was autistic."


Link Posted: 4/20/2007 6:10:27 AM EDT
[#44]
It's nice to finally hear families call it like it is for once, none of that "he was a good kid, he wouldn't hurt anyone" bullshit.
Link Posted: 4/20/2007 6:18:54 AM EDT
[#45]

Quoted:
Bump for full story

SON OF A BITCH
EXCLUSIVE: Grandad's anger at uni murderer
Graham Brough In South Korea 20/04/2007

THE grandfather of Cho Seung-Hui said yesterday: "Son of a bitch. It serves him right he died with his victims."

Kim Hyang-Sik, 82, said he had a doom-laden dream of Cho's parents the night of his murderous rampage - and woke to hear the news of the massacre and his grandson's death.

He watched Cho's sick video of himself holding a gun to his head.

His sister Kim Yang-Sun, 85, who also saw it, told the Mirror that afterwards her brother was so distraught he had "gone away for a few days to calm himself down and avoid more questions".

She too repeatedly referred to the killer as "son of a bitch" or "a***hole" and said his mother Kim Hyang-Yim had problems with him from infancy.

Yang-Sun revealed the eight-year-old was diagnosed as autistic soon after his family emigrated to the US.

She said: "He was very quiet and only followed his mother and father around and when others called his name he just answered yes or no but never showed any feelings or motions.

"We started to worry that he was autistic - that was the big concern of his mother. He was even a loner as a child.

"Soon after they got to America his mother was so worried about his inability to talk she took him to hospital and he was diagnosed as autistic."

Yang-Sun spoke at her tiny one roomed shack inside a vinyl farm shelter in the Gohyang area of South Korea's capital Seoul.

The family had stayed there the night before they emigrated in 1992. Yang-Sun said Cho's mother had been reluctant to marry her older husband.

She said: "She had five brothers and sisters and she was the second eldest child. She took care of them after she graduated from high school, which meant a lot of self-sacrifice.

"Hyang-Yim was a full-time house person on one of her parents' small farms outside Seoul. She stayed at home like that for years and was still single at home when she was 29.

"We became worried that she was spending too much time at home with her brothers and sisters and family and getting to old for a husband.

"So the family decided to force her into a blind date to find a husband. She met Cho Sung-Tae on that date. He was 10 years older at 39 and still single too. They decided to get married soon after that.

"She didn't want to but her family insisted because we thought she was getting past the right age and it would be good for her.

"Her husband was very serious and quiet and careful with money. He was not very sociable and not very friendly to his mother-in-law and father-in-law.

"After they were married he went away twice to Saudi Arabia in the 80s to try to make some money in the construction boom. He came back with about £2,000, which was enough to buy a small house in Seoul. He also ran a second-hand bookstore. His mother was living in the States on a long term visit to stay with his sister. She asked him to bring his family to live there.

"His sold the house to pay for the emigration costs and rented instead but there were lots of delays and eventually the whole process to get the permissions and organise things took eight years.

"By that time the money from the house was nearly gone. They were barely making ends meet so they had nothing to lose and had this idea of the American dream where there was a lot of money to be made."

She went on: "The reaction of my brother was that Seung-Hui was a troublemaker and it served him right that he died because he caused his mother a lot of problems. He was more worried about his daughter.

"He spoke to a few reporters to express sympathy to victims' families on behalf of our family but now he has gone away. He is 82 and lives quietly on a small farm and all this is too much for him."

Other relatives admitted Cho's parents had always been aware of his problems but had neither the time nor money for specialist help.

His uncle Chan Kim, 56, said: "He wasn't like a normal kid. We were worried about him not talking.

"Both his parents knew he had mental problems but they were poor and they couldn't send him to a special hospital in the United States.

"His mother and sister were asking his friends to help instead.

"His parents worked and did not have time to look after his condition and didn't give him special treatment.

"They had no time or money to look after his special problem even though they knew he was autistic."



but they can send him to VT and his sister to princeton WTF" edit refer to the last line
Link Posted: 4/20/2007 6:44:25 AM EDT
[#46]
I think calling an asian oriental is about the same level as calling a black guy negro.  While not really wrong...  You are still likely to get a WTF.

oriental is to negro
as chinc/gook/slope/slant is to ni**er

Just keep that in mind and save yourself a trip to the HR office.

-G

PS I do infact hate Rosie O'donnel.
Link Posted: 4/20/2007 6:46:31 AM EDT
[#47]

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
Orientals take honor very seriously.  Cho brought shame upon the family, and there is no greater infraction in their culture than disgracing the family.




Yeah, you know, as in a person from the Orient?



No shit... Who comes up with this PC crap ?!  I mean, really....  It's a word that was used forever and suddenly now, in the last couple years, it's racist ????

WTF ???  Who the fuck DECIDES this stuff ???  Does ANYONE know ???


Hell, I never heard it called racist and I'm only 38.  I remember it used in text books and everywhere else and nobody said squat back then... None of the Chinese, Japanese or Korean kids I went to school with ever seemed to be bothered by it.  

 This world is so fucking retarded sometimes.



That's because we asians are the silent minority.  We almost NEVER complain about anything.  We leave that to the others...

1st generation opens a business, 2nd generation ups the ante, 3rd generation are engineers / doctors.  That's how we roll.
Link Posted: 4/20/2007 7:40:49 AM EDT
[#48]

Quoted:
I'm of Chinese descent. I never even knew the term "Oriental" could be considered offensive. Like other posters have said, it's just a more precise term than Asian.

Just PC bullshit that shouldn't bother anyone. Sort of like saying "African-American" instead of "black." I'm surprised nobody's renamed the United Negro College Fund.


+1
Link Posted: 4/20/2007 9:32:50 AM EDT
[#49]

Quoted:
I think calling an asian oriental is about the same level as calling a black guy negro.  While not really wrong...  You are still likely to get a WTF.

oriental is to negro
as chinc/gook/slope/slant is to ni**er



Thank you for the sensitivity training.  
Link Posted: 4/20/2007 9:38:23 AM EDT
[#50]

Quoted:

Quoted:
I think calling an asian oriental is about the same level as calling a black guy negro.  While not really wrong...  You are still likely to get a WTF.

oriental is to negro
as chinc/gook/slope/slant is to ni**er



Thank you for the sensitivity training.  


STFU cracka!!!

About Cho's poor parents sending their kids to Vtech and Princeton... the kids most likely got shcolarships. Cho was getting Student Aid, and most students capable of getting into Princeton from a poor, korean, immigrant familiy most definately would have gotten scholarships and financial aid...
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