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Posted: 9/21/2014 6:52:28 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/21/2014 7:04:16 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2014 7:06:40 AM EST by FB41]
I use personally developed ones that I laminate.

I fly civilian fixed wing and have lists for over 35 types, piston and turboprop.

My checklists are created from experience with the aircraft and my preference for the way they're set-up and the flow system I use.
Link Posted: 9/21/2014 8:47:43 AM EST
I used laminated checklists for over 20 years while owning the Cessna 177 Cardinal. In rental planes I used what they provided. Most of those had laminated checklists. When I bought the Kitfox a week ago the first thing I did was make a laminated checklist for it.
Link Posted: 9/21/2014 9:26:34 AM EST
I had our checklist printed onto PVC. The checklist is what I made/changed from another operator. Gulfstream GV
I fly a Global on a contract basis and they use laminated paper.

My opinion is that the electronic checklists are just one more thing you have to screw with, printed checklists are always available.
Link Posted: 9/21/2014 10:16:50 AM EST
Company issued bi-fold paper card for everything but the before takeoff and before landing checklists. Those are on a mechanical checklist in the center console. Flip a switch one way to light up the before takeoff side, and another way for before landing. As you do each item, flip the switch next to it, the caption goes out, and a green light lights up.

I like the mechanical list. We don't always do the lists in strict order, and it makes it easy to see whats left. We also run the paper descent, and some items on the mechanical before landing at the same time. The climb, cruise and descent checklists are run silently by the PM, without the PF calling for them.

MD-80 for a 121 airline.
Link Posted: 9/21/2014 11:30:02 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2014 11:35:12 AM EST by twentyfourseven]
F-18. I use a paper checklist I made printed out and in a plastic sleeve on a 9g kneeboard. Under it I have more I commonly used info in more plastic sleeves (range info, local navaids, some quick reference emergency stuff, commonly used approaches, etc). I put that on my left leg. On my right leg I have another kneeboard with a pen dummy corded that I put the mission kneeboard card on, then some blank pieces of paper for writing.

I'm pretty jealous of the guys that are left handed. Must be nice to be able to have your right hand on the stick and write at the same time!

I do everything from habit pattern, and then review the checklist while I'm taxiing out or not doing anything to make sure I didn't miss anything. Same thing once airborne and getting combat systems set up. If you were to do everything prompted from the checklist it would take you 2 hours to get started up.

I'm pretty obsessed with cockpit organization and always trying to get better or be more efficient. You have to be organized when you're by yourself in a cramped cockpit. Example: flying a jet with a center stick you tend to anchor your forearm on your thigh//kneeboard. I got so tired of my forearm rubbing my kneeboard card off my right kneeboard, usually at the most inconvenient times (low altitude, BFMing, etc), that I started sliding blank pieces of paper in the top of my right kneeboard, then folding them down so I can write on them. Then I write all the stuff I really need from the kneeboard card onto the blank piece of paper. Now it's impossible for me to lose my paper from my right kneeboard. What a glorious day it was when I figured that trick out.

/OCD
Link Posted: 9/21/2014 11:42:37 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Dr_Nimslow:
Company issued bi-fold paper card for everything but the before takeoff and before landing checklists. Those are on a mechanical checklist in the center console. Flip a switch one way to light up the before takeoff side, and another way for before landing. As you do each item, flip the switch next to it, the caption goes out, and a green light lights up.

I like the mechanical list. We don't always do the lists in strict order, and it makes it easy to see whats left. We also run the paper descent, and some items on the mechanical before landing at the same time. The climb, cruise and descent checklists are run silently by the PM, without the PF calling for them.

MD-80 for a 121 airline.
View Quote
My friend who I did my instrument work with 35 years ago and I am now doing the tailwheel checkout that the insurance company wants used to fly the MD-80 he now flies 737 for his regular job. Insurance company wants me to get another 10 hours dual in the Kitfox since I haven't flown much tailwheel in the last 15 years. The discount on the insurance more than paid for the instructor time so it is well worth it to fly 10 hours with a good friend.

Link Posted: 9/21/2014 11:48:17 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2014 11:48:38 AM EST by kfs35]
I use laminated at work and in our 172. Company developed at work and Surecheck (I think, came with the plane) in the 172.
Link Posted: 9/21/2014 11:48:32 AM EST
In the lear and citation we use laminated paper for the normals, published checklists for the abnormals.

For ScanEagle and Heron we used electronic checklists due to the nature of UAS. They were convenient but it was easy to fat-finger which results in skipping things if you aren't on your game.

I love using an IPad as an EFB but for checklists I prefer paper.
Link Posted: 9/21/2014 4:02:48 PM EST
Laminated Paper. I've heard mixed reviews of the ForeFlight checklist app.
Link Posted: 9/21/2014 4:15:20 PM EST
.mil rotary wing

I use a combination. Take-off and landing checks are posted on the instrument panel. I usually use paper in plastic covers (in rings) for everything else. I do have an iPad that has expanded checklists and briefing guides, that I might use in conjunction with Foreflight for instrument stuff (normally VFR, so not that often).

My aircraft has a fair amount of space, so organization is centered more on convenience than access or reducing clutter, like a fighter cockpit.
Link Posted: 9/21/2014 5:22:55 PM EST
I have a Cherokee 140 and started with the generic laminated plastic one that came with the plane. It was ok but not perfect so I broke down and made my own. Printed it off in color on card stock and then laminated it.
Link Posted: 9/21/2014 5:44:15 PM EST
Civil. All the airplanes I fly have club or FBO supplied checklists they expect me to use, plus some of the Pipers have them on the panel. That plus Red STTAG & GUMPPASS and I feel pretty good.
Link Posted: 9/21/2014 6:17:04 PM EST
.mil helicopter (still a newbie)

I put the issued paper checklist into the plastic checklist pouches. For the local (1-17 CAV) pilot pack I laminated the pages and put them into the plastic checklist pouches so moisture doesn't mess them up. I have an iPad with other stuff but I don't use it in the Kiowa, only for planning or studying.
Link Posted: 9/21/2014 6:43:19 PM EST
Small airplanes - cigar & gumps.
777 has a real nice electronic checklist that knows if you moved certain switches, i.e. if you put the gear down it knows that and that item on the checklist goes green.
All others - paper.
Link Posted: 9/21/2014 7:09:50 PM EST
tacair - admin kneeboard on the left; laminated course rules and area stuff, self made checklists in sleeves (changes sometimes, don't want to relaminate); usually go out board with the checklist and tuck between leg and seat. Tactical (when I was) or test cards on the right knee board; flip over with test cards (though this sometimes is an issue with touch screens). I would like to be able to flip inboard with both (as on the left leg the checklist often gets in the way of the throttle, on the right the stick on side stick); if inboard it would be out of the way but don't want to block the ejection handle.

I am not sure I'd like electronic, paper works well for me. It is mostly abbreviated checks to remind me of the larger actual lists. For test cards, again don't think electronic would work; to much flipping around and to much writing.

I do prefer card stock for tactical and test card stuff, something a little more durable that won't rip up easy.

I typically only write on the right kneeboard, rarely on the left. Even thought I consider the left my admin kneeboard, I write ATIS, comm, etc. down on the right.
Link Posted: 9/21/2014 7:28:38 PM EST
I used to write comm frec's on the back of my hand.......... but that was along time ago in a galaxy far far away.
Link Posted: 9/22/2014 11:11:41 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/22/2014 11:12:14 AM EST by DRich]
Laminated here. Tried using tablets for a few months since I'm a gadget freak, but the laminated paper is more convenient for me and I don't care if I accidentally smear grease/gas/etc on it.
Link Posted: 9/22/2014 12:05:02 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/22/2014 12:08:50 PM EST by a555]
I wrote my own printed checklist. I use an outline form with bold words to make it easier to not get lost in the text. The bold is for quick verification, the full text is for someone who might be flying the plane if for some reason someone else is flying it. My airplane has mechanical landing gear operated by a Johnson bar. The bar has a detent with a pin that locks it in place. It's possible to have the gear down, get a green light and still not have it fully locked. For this reason, oddities with the airplane have descriptions. The outline style layout with the indentations make it easier to focus on the checklist. I've found that lists that are walls of text are easier to miss items on.

I also have mental checklists that I use, for instance the GUMPs check on landing, and I have one that I use on my turn onto the runway to take off to verify flaps, trim, fuel selector, fuel pump, switches and radios.

For instance:

8)Ensure gear is properly locked. (You should not be able to put a fingernail between the handle and its locking position. If gear is not properly locked, twist and lift handle to lock it in place).
Link Posted: 9/22/2014 5:07:29 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By a555:
I wrote my own printed checklist. I use an outline form with bold words to make it easier to not get lost in the text. The bold is for quick verification, the full text is for someone who might be flying the plane if for some reason someone else is flying it. My airplane has mechanical landing gear operated by a Johnson bar. The bar has a detent with a pin that locks it in place. It's possible to have the gear down, get a green light and still not have it fully locked. For this reason, oddities with the airplane have descriptions. The outline style layout with the indentations make it easier to focus on the checklist. I've found that lists that are walls of text are easier to miss items on.

I also have mental checklists that I use, for instance the GUMPs check on landing, and I have one that I use on my turn onto the runway to take off to verify flaps, trim, fuel selector, fuel pump, switches and radios.

For instance:

8)Ensure gear is properly locked. (You should not be able to put a fingernail between the handle and its locking position. If gear is not properly locked, twist and lift handle to lock it in place).
View Quote


I love the Johnson bar.

(No homo)
Link Posted: 9/23/2014 7:29:45 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/23/2014 7:39:00 AM EST by ske714]
CIGAR

For anything more complicated that the Champ, I like the SureCheck Pro's
Link Posted: 9/23/2014 10:19:05 AM EST
Laminated check list is great for us.
Link Posted: 9/26/2014 6:44:07 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By twentyfourseven:
I'm pretty jealous of the guys that are left handed. Must be nice to be able to have your right hand on the stick and write at the same time!

Example: flying a jet with a center stick you tend to anchor your forearm on your thigh//kneeboard. I got so tired of my forearm rubbing my kneeboard card off my right kneeboard, usually at the most inconvenient times (low altitude, BFMing, etc), that I started sliding blank pieces of paper in the top of my right kneeboard, then folding them down so I can write on them.
/OCD
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So, is the throttle on the left side of the cockpit? Not familiar with F-18 (or any jet). Only center stick airplane I ever flew had the throttle on the right side, so I (right-handed) never had the writing problem since I was flying left handed...
Link Posted: 9/26/2014 7:28:04 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BlueMR2:


So, is the throttle on the left side of the cockpit? Not familiar with F-18 (or any jet). Only center stick airplane I ever flew had the throttle on the right side, so I (right-handed) never had the writing problem since I was flying left handed...
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BlueMR2:
Originally Posted By twentyfourseven:
I'm pretty jealous of the guys that are left handed. Must be nice to be able to have your right hand on the stick and write at the same time!

Example: flying a jet with a center stick you tend to anchor your forearm on your thigh//kneeboard. I got so tired of my forearm rubbing my kneeboard card off my right kneeboard, usually at the most inconvenient times (low altitude, BFMing, etc), that I started sliding blank pieces of paper in the top of my right kneeboard, then folding them down so I can write on them.
/OCD


So, is the throttle on the left side of the cockpit? Not familiar with F-18 (or any jet). Only center stick airplane I ever flew had the throttle on the right side, so I (right-handed) never had the writing problem since I was flying left handed...



Yep as well as side stick jets (fighter and attack); don't know of any which are not that way.
Link Posted: 9/26/2014 7:32:14 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/27/2014 6:43:51 AM EST
Plastic-ish paper checklist

usaf.mil

I also have a plastic brains mini-binder with in-flight gouge
Link Posted: 9/28/2014 10:46:14 PM EST
I might hold an unpopular opinion, but the CJ's I fly are simple enough that cockpit flow followed by quick verification works really well for me. Certain phases of flight, the checklist items are so few and so intuitive that I often omit checklist usage completely and rely on cockpit flow.
An example would be after take-off; the checklist items are:
Gear - Up
Flaps - Up
Throttles - MCT
Engine Sync - On
Yaw Damper - On
View Quote

These items are all ingrained in my cockpit flow, I've never missed one after take-off. It'd be very hard to do so. Frankly, after take-off I think there are more important things for my hands to be doing than holding a checklist, and so I don't use it for this phase of flight. The before landing checklist is the same, very simple and intuitive items that are committed to memory on a basic level. Can't land any plane without the gear and flaps being out. Can't land with autopilot on.

An example of where I absolutely would use the checklist would be the Initial Cockpit Prep or Before Taxi phases. There are enough items in these, and enough small differences between various S/N's in our fleet, that it's easy to miss an item to two. I still do everything using cockpit flow first, but then I back it up with the checklist, taking care of anything I missed.

Obviously, this is coming from someone who is now flying single-pilot. Back when we used a crew of two, we absolutely used checklists at all times; perhaps more line-by-line or cockpit flow depending on who I was paired with, but always using it.
For myself, I use it where it enhances my level of performance, and don't where it would hinder my performance.

In small planes that I'm extremely familiar with, like a Cessna 182 or a Van's RV, I don't ever touch the checklist. In others that I'm not as familiar with, like a Baron, you bet your ass I use it the entire flight.

As far as what type, I hate the electronic ones. My personal preference is the manufacturer checklist, especially if it's like the Cessna style, where each phase of flight has it's own page. My tired eyes do much better with print I can read and pages I don't have to search through to find what I need.
I really dislike the checkmate ones that put everything on one sheet. Those drive me crazy trying to find stuff when I should be able to focus on flying the plane.




Link Posted: 9/29/2014 7:17:38 AM EST
Originally Posted By CFII:
Paper? Electronic? Printed on dashboard?

What kind of aircraft, military or civil?

Dislikes or likes. Strengths and weaknesses.


Me:

CH47F. Paper checklist in plastic sleeves. It is easy to forget where you are in it if you are distracted.....
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Memory

T38
Link Posted: 9/30/2014 8:13:14 PM EST
Private here, use the SureCheck.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 7:46:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/2/2014 7:47:17 PM EST by ElSupremo]
Reading is not my thing..........I just watched the movie

Have you read the checklist...naw man I saw the movie!!!
Link Posted: 10/4/2014 2:25:18 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Andrew123:



Yep as well as side stick jets (fighter and attack); don't know of any which are not that way.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Andrew123:
Originally Posted By BlueMR2:
Originally Posted By twentyfourseven:
I'm pretty jealous of the guys that are left handed. Must be nice to be able to have your right hand on the stick and write at the same time!

Example: flying a jet with a center stick you tend to anchor your forearm on your thigh//kneeboard. I got so tired of my forearm rubbing my kneeboard card off my right kneeboard, usually at the most inconvenient times (low altitude, BFMing, etc), that I started sliding blank pieces of paper in the top of my right kneeboard, then folding them down so I can write on them.
/OCD


So, is the throttle on the left side of the cockpit? Not familiar with F-18 (or any jet). Only center stick airplane I ever flew had the throttle on the right side, so I (right-handed) never had the writing problem since I was flying left handed...



Yep as well as side stick jets (fighter and attack); don't know of any which are not that way.
the f-16 also has a static stick, which I always thought was kinda wild and would definately take some getting used to . I believe they engineered in a small amount of play in stick movement with the introduction of the block V's.

I'm actually kinda curious now that i think about it whether or not that play that was engineered into the f-16 stick was meant as some kind of expo control to give it a slight dead center or non linear pitch control or if its there to help pilots better make very minor corrections which has got to be hard using a solid stick on a jet that was built to be super twitchy.
Link Posted: 10/4/2014 2:27:45 PM EST
Civil. 182. Plain old paper laminate for me. same way every time.

monotony is the awful reward of the cautious.
Link Posted: 10/4/2014 4:36:14 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By pwr2al4:
the f-16 also has a static stick, which I always thought was kinda wild and would definately take some getting used to . I believe they engineered in a small amount of play in stick movement with the introduction of the block V's.

I'm actually kinda curious now that i think about it whether or not that play that was engineered into the f-16 stick was meant as some kind of expo control to give it a slight dead center or non linear pitch control or if its there to help pilots better make very minor corrections which has got to be hard using a solid stick on a jet that was built to be super twitchy.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By pwr2al4:
Originally Posted By Andrew123:
Originally Posted By BlueMR2:
Originally Posted By twentyfourseven:
I'm pretty jealous of the guys that are left handed. Must be nice to be able to have your right hand on the stick and write at the same time!

Example: flying a jet with a center stick you tend to anchor your forearm on your thigh//kneeboard. I got so tired of my forearm rubbing my kneeboard card off my right kneeboard, usually at the most inconvenient times (low altitude, BFMing, etc), that I started sliding blank pieces of paper in the top of my right kneeboard, then folding them down so I can write on them.
/OCD


So, is the throttle on the left side of the cockpit? Not familiar with F-18 (or any jet). Only center stick airplane I ever flew had the throttle on the right side, so I (right-handed) never had the writing problem since I was flying left handed...



Yep as well as side stick jets (fighter and attack); don't know of any which are not that way.
the f-16 also has a static stick, which I always thought was kinda wild and would definately take some getting used to . I believe they engineered in a small amount of play in stick movement with the introduction of the block V's.

I'm actually kinda curious now that i think about it whether or not that play that was engineered into the f-16 stick was meant as some kind of expo control to give it a slight dead center or non linear pitch control or if its there to help pilots better make very minor corrections which has got to be hard using a solid stick on a jet that was built to be super twitchy.

They did add some movement, originally it was force feed back only. I've flown with in jet that could alter the controls, I did get to use a stick that did not move. It was weird, and I preferred some movement. If I remember correctly, with a stick that didn't move I think the tendency was to over control.
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