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Posted: 10/28/2013 4:07:14 PM EST
2006 Toyota Tundra with a sealed transmission so I have to take it to shop that can actually perform the fill. I have 108K on it.

Was talking with a friend whose hubbie is a mechanic who told me NOT (emphatically) to change the tranny fluid because the tranny had gotten used to the exiting fluid and flushing it would kick up pieces of metal and end up costing me a transmission.

What says the hive. This advice is against every fiber of my being but almost kind of sort of makes sense.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:10:00 PM EST
I change motor oil often. Auto tranny fluid never unless it was operated under water.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:10:46 PM EST
Transmissions have oil?
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:11:13 PM EST
couldnt hurt
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:11:50 PM EST
Sounds like voodoo shit.

I swap tranny fluid at 75k.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:12:07 PM EST
Its generally a good thing to change but not flush the fluid at the 100K marker. I would go off what they recommend the the service interval for that car.

Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:13:22 PM EST
was having some issues in my car so I figured maybe I was low on transmission fluid, popped the hood and imagine my surprise when I couldn't find a transmission dipstick...sealed transmission so im not exactly worried about it
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:13:31 PM EST
My F150 has 8 years and 133k on the original fluid. I have decided that it is time to drop the pan, change the filter and replace the 8 or so quarts that I will lose. I will not be stirring up any metal as it should be stuck to the magnet in the bottom of the pan. I will wipe out any funk that is in the pan before I put it back on.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:15:29 PM EST
Ive had too many go bad after the flush. I did the drop pan method, not the swap with the lines in a bucket and it still killed it. All Ford C6s and one AOD
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:17:59 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/28/2013 4:27:39 PM EST by klinc]
Did it on my Jeep (130k miles) last week. First time I did it but figured what the hell while installing transmission cooler.

Car has "sealed" transmission. Has mechanice do it not too long after we bought it at 100k miles or so.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:18:58 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/28/2013 4:52:11 PM EST by GearForGuns]
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Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:19:08 PM EST
Sealed my ass. There is a fill plug somewhere.

I say find it and sniff. If it smells like fried ass, let it ride. If not, change out fluid as per OEM shop manual procedure.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:19:25 PM EST
Yes....

Fucking yes.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:19:45 PM EST
I would drain what I could out of the pan and refill. Ive read and seen a few pics and it doesn't look too bad of a job even with the sealed transmission.

I bought my 05 4.7 4runner with the sealed transmission a couple months ago with 124k and the tranny fluid was done at 120k according to the service records.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:20:02 PM EST
Originally Posted By newarcher:


What says the hive.
View Quote
has it been used hard at all, towing?


if not, leave it
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:20:12 PM EST
I've been told by the shops that, on mine, every 30k. I keep up on it. So far no problems. '97 Explorer Sport, 2000 F150. Of course I believe everything the shops tell me.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:21:39 PM EST
Depends... how does the current transmission fluid look/smell. If it's burnt, then your friend's hubby's boyfriend is right and really you should unload the truck! If it is just dirty and old, then by all means change it! (did my Tacoma at 80k) And yes, the sealed units now are a PITA. Easiest way to look at the fluid is to loosen a hose to the front transmission cooler and examine the fluid.


And for whatever it's worth.... engines/transmissions/machines don't get "used" to anything. They are made of metal, not flesh, they can't adapt or develop feelings. They also have fluid pumps and filters... there isn't chunks of metals hiding in wait. However, old burnt transmission fluid CAN hide symptoms of a bad transmission due to fluid thickening so the guy isn't wrong per se... but head in sand isn't the way to approach it.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:22:02 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/28/2013 4:24:27 PM EST by FALARAK]
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Originally Posted By DuraToTheMax:
Sounds like voodoo shit.

I swap tranny fluid at 75k.
View Quote


This.

I did my first change in my Grand Cherokee at 95k (I only do pan drops), then every 25k after that. I sold it with 185k on it and it was JUST starting to slip, and those were know to be really weak trannies.


Pretty sure that Tundra has a VERY long interval from Toyota - like first change at 125k or so... I know the 07's did. I'd take it in to Toyota and have them do it the way the factory recommends with their expensive fluid.

IGNORE the people who are anti-flush.... that is conventional wisdom, this isn't always a conventional transmission. You should change it the same way a dealership/factory service manual says to, or have them do it.

Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:22:32 PM EST
Change it, yes.

Flush it, NO.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:24:05 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By RebFootCav:
Change it, yes.

Flush it, NO.
View Quote


+1

This is the only correct answer.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:24:08 PM EST
I won't flush them. But I will drop the pan and change the filter and fluid. I've had cars that I thought the trans was going bad and a fluid change made it run fine again.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:24:30 PM EST
I had a transmission guy tell me if it has more than 90k on it, don't mess with it. He stated the same reasons and this is a guy that was over 30 years in the business. We were discussing Chevy transmissions.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:25:09 PM EST
Meh. My ten year old Chevy has 165k on it with the original fluid. Only issue with the trans is that 1st to 2nd shimmer that they all have from that era and it's been there for ten years. <shrugs>
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:26:28 PM EST
And remember - there is 50 years of Shadetree mechanic religion, coincidence, and voodoo ignoring any kind of scientific data, on the modern automatic transmission.

It is DAMNED hard to know what's right.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:27:27 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Mossberg:
Sealed my ass. There is a fill plug somewhere.
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Originally Posted By Mossberg:
Sealed my ass. There is a fill plug somewhere.


Originally Posted By Dirtymoe21:
I would drain what I could out of the pan and refill. Ive read and seen a few pics and it doesn't look too bad of a job even with the sealed transmission.
.


Draining is easy...filling is the tricky part on Toyotas beyond just the specific fluid. Especially filling to the correct level. Since there is no dip stick you have to set it via the fill plug at the correct temperature. Google it, do-able at home but local dealer charged nearly nothing for labor.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:27:58 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/28/2013 4:28:53 PM EST by 13starsinax]
I know I am slow but how do you check levels on a sealed transmission?


edit: to slow.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:28:30 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ManMan:
Depends... how does the current transmission fluid look/smell. If it's burnt, then your friend's hubby's boyfriend is right and really you should unload the truck! If it is just dirty and old, then by all means change it! (did my Tacoma at 80k) And yes, the sealed units now are a PITA. Easiest way to look at the fluid is to loosen a hose to the front transmission cooler and examine the fluid.


And for whatever it's worth.... engines/transmissions/machines don't get "used" to anything. They are made of metal, not flesh, they can't adapt or develop feelings. They also have fluid pumps and filters... there isn't chunks of metals hiding in wait. However, old burnt transmission fluid CAN hide symptoms of a bad transmission due to fluid thickening so the guy isn't wrong per se... but head in sand isn't the way to approach it.
View Quote


The part in red is absolutely untrue when it comes to modern automatic transmissions. They absolutely do adapt. GM has a section of transmission control specifically called "adapts". They are learning machines.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:29:09 PM EST
I have put in excess of 200k miles on vehicles and never changed the trans fluid (or filter for that matter). Unless you have to disassemble it or submerge it in water I see no reason to ever do so.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:29:39 PM EST
Sniff it. If it smells burned, change it. If not, leave it. It all depends on what temperatures your tranny has seen.

Do you haul stuff? Drive excessively fast/like a douche? If yes, change it. If not, then you are probably fine. I have a friend with 350k on the auto tranny in his old 7.3L with no issues and as far as he knows, the original fluid. He has owned the truck since it had 30k on it.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:30:41 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By MyAliyah:
I've been told by the shops that, on mine, every 30k. I keep up on it. So far no problems. '97 Explorer Sport, 2000 F150. Of course I believe everything the shops tell me.
View Quote


They love you for it.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:31:28 PM EST
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Originally Posted By glockfan45:
I have put in excess of 200k miles on vehicles and never changed the trans fluid (or filter for that matter). Unless you have to disassemble it or submerge it in water I see no reason to ever do so.
View Quote


Some trannies you get away with that, some you wont. It depends greatly on the make, model, if an effective aux transmission cooler is installed, if the radiator is effective at cooling the transmission fluid, how hot that particular transmission model runs, and how much towing or long periods of elevation changes are driven.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:31:32 PM EST
Nissan doesn't recommend transmission flushes on their vehicles. Since yours is a sealed transmission, I'm not sure if that's the case or if it's a lifetime fluid thing.

What does Toyota say?

Nissan only recommends drain and fill if you need to change the fluid. So, on my Titan I change out about 5 qts of the 14 total qts my trucks tranny holds. Still running strong at 145K miles. Nissan said that the flush machines most of the time are not maintained properly leaving old/wrong fluid in them. I have the TSB saved somewhere, because not all dealers have stopped offering the transmission flushes.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:31:48 PM EST
Q: Who has actually done the research to answer this question?
A: Toyota.

Steps to find your answer:
1. Look in your manual to see what the mfg says.
2. Do what the mfg. recommends (and I'd go to the dealer for this)
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:32:15 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 13starsinax:
I know I am slow but how do you check levels on a sealed transmission?


edit: to slow.
View Quote


On the ZF 6speed transmissions used by Ford. There is a micro dip stick hidden on the passenger side next to the exhaust pipe. Remove the cap and use the dip stick like a regular one. Its very short and you have to go under car to do it.

Not sure on other types.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:33:59 PM EST
Sell it and buy a truck without a faggot box.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:35:14 PM EST
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Originally Posted By glockfan45:


They love you for it.
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Originally Posted By glockfan45:
Originally Posted By MyAliyah:
I've been told by the shops that, on mine, every 30k. I keep up on it. So far no problems. '97 Explorer Sport, 2000 F150. Of course I believe everything the shops tell me.


They love you for it.

I have never heard change it every 30,000. They are stealing your money. Manual transmissions don't touch the trans fluid auto every 100,000-150,000 miles.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:36:52 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By glockfan45:


They love you for it.
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Originally Posted By glockfan45:
Originally Posted By MyAliyah:
I've been told by the shops that, on mine, every 30k. I keep up on it. So far no problems. '97 Explorer Sport, 2000 F150. Of course I believe everything the shops tell me.


They love you for it.


The transmission fluid change on my wife's Acura is only $70 at the dealer. That's cheap. The factory interval is every 60k. It certainly will not hurt to keep fresh and clean fluid in there, and even every 30k is not that extreme.

Now, even if it is costing you $150 per change, and every 30k you change it, at 150k miles that's 5 changes, or $750. You aint gonna get any kind of transmission rebuild for that kinda money.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:37:11 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By FALARAK:


Some trannies you get away with that, some you wont. It depends greatly on the make, model, if an effective aux transmission cooler is installed, if the radiator is effective at cooling the transmission fluid, how hot that particular transmission model runs, and how much towing or long periods of elevation changes are driven.
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Originally Posted By FALARAK:
Originally Posted By glockfan45:
I have put in excess of 200k miles on vehicles and never changed the trans fluid (or filter for that matter). Unless you have to disassemble it or submerge it in water I see no reason to ever do so.


Some trannies you get away with that, some you wont. It depends greatly on the make, model, if an effective aux transmission cooler is installed, if the radiator is effective at cooling the transmission fluid, how hot that particular transmission model runs, and how much towing or long periods of elevation changes are driven.


My current is a Cummins with a AOD, 230k miles and pulls a 5th wheel camper 10-15k miles per year with multiple passes over the Rockies. Occasionally large farm equipment on a goose neck as well.

Previous was a Ranger also an AOD. Lots of stop and go city driving and retired at 215k or so with no issues. Never hauled much more than a quad and a bass boat.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:38:20 PM EST
i own a 2006 cummins with a dodge transmission.

i change transmission fluid every 30-35000 miles.

i live in fear of my transmission.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:39:26 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By FALARAK:


The transmission fluid change on my wife's Acura is only $70 at the dealer. That's cheap. The factory interval is every 60k. It certainly will not hurt to keep fresh and clean fluid in there, and even every 30k is not that extreme.

Now, even if it is costing you $150 per change, and every 30k you change it, at 150k miles that's 5 changes, or $750. You aint gonna get any kind of transmission rebuild for that kinda money.
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Originally Posted By FALARAK:
Originally Posted By glockfan45:
Originally Posted By MyAliyah:
I've been told by the shops that, on mine, every 30k. I keep up on it. So far no problems. '97 Explorer Sport, 2000 F150. Of course I believe everything the shops tell me.


They love you for it.


The transmission fluid change on my wife's Acura is only $70 at the dealer. That's cheap. The factory interval is every 60k. It certainly will not hurt to keep fresh and clean fluid in there, and even every 30k is not that extreme.

Now, even if it is costing you $150 per change, and every 30k you change it, at 150k miles that's 5 changes, or $750. You aint gonna get any kind of transmission rebuild for that kinda money.


If he's having them change the trans fluid every 30k he is getting raped and the service manager owes him a night out with dinner, dancing and some tender kissing from time to time.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:39:54 PM EST
My 95 BMW 750iL was a 195k and never had a problem with slipping on stock oil in a sealed transmission. I bought it at 190k and ran strong.I would say follow what the dealer recommends for change intervals. Sealed transmissions don't require changing for a while I read. If you do decide to change to fresh oil, make sure you do it right and ensure all metal shavings are removed and new oil isn't full of super low friction stuff because of the higher miles your Tundra has. Save the old oil in case it does slip. Like all oils, lubrication lessens as time goes on (in theory).
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:40:19 PM EST
I service the slushbox in my POS Escort once a year whether it needs it or not.



Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:40:20 PM EST
My former brother use to own an AAMCO tranny joint and his guys said that if you did not change it by 50-60k you best not.
It was not a matter of flakes of metal screwing the tranny but of the new fluids cleaning agents releasing shellac
left over from the old that kills the tranny. They said you either change it at the intervals specified or not at all and when you go with the latter
it will be changed when it implodes, eventually.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:40:23 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 13starsinax:
I know I am slow but how do you check levels on a sealed transmission?


edit: to slow.
View Quote




There is no dipstick and you just trust that it is full. As long as there are no

leaks you are good to go I guess. I don't like it but that is progress

The trans is sealed and tested and then installed in the vehicle on the assembly

line. The fluid can be changed you need to have some special tools to do so.




Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:40:43 PM EST
How hot is too hot for tranny fluid? I searched and asked about a year ago and found no answers. I had recently done a fluid/filter change (100k maintenance interval), then did some serious towing (90% of tow capacity for 1k miles and a lotta hills). Temps got up to 230 or 240f.

I couldn't find an answer, so I changed it out anyway. $70 for fluid, filter and gasket and an afternoon under my truck seemed like cheap peace of mind. Plus, I have access to a lift, so it was a pretty easy job.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:40:48 PM EST
I'm a mechanic but just don't know. My 1999 Chevy Blazer has 180000 miles and has been flushed several times with no problems. I used to tow with it a lot. My wife's 2004 Chevy Tahoe has been flushed once at 230000 with no problem. The transmission guy we use to rebuild hates flushing. We use a BG flush machine where I work, with BG "all purpose" synthetic fluid. I don't think we have caused any problems. Many people already have problems and think flushing will fix it. It doesn't. I would take the Toyota mech's advice and take it to Toyota.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:42:18 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By glockfan45:


If he's having them change the trans fluid every 30k he is getting raped and the service manager owes him a night out with dinner, dancing and some tender kissing from time to time.
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Originally Posted By glockfan45:
Originally Posted By FALARAK:
Originally Posted By glockfan45:
Originally Posted By MyAliyah:
I've been told by the shops that, on mine, every 30k. I keep up on it. So far no problems. '97 Explorer Sport, 2000 F150. Of course I believe everything the shops tell me.


They love you for it.


The transmission fluid change on my wife's Acura is only $70 at the dealer. That's cheap. The factory interval is every 60k. It certainly will not hurt to keep fresh and clean fluid in there, and even every 30k is not that extreme.

Now, even if it is costing you $150 per change, and every 30k you change it, at 150k miles that's 5 changes, or $750. You aint gonna get any kind of transmission rebuild for that kinda money.


If he's having them change the trans fluid every 30k he is getting raped and the service manager owes him a night out with dinner, dancing and some tender kissing from time to time.



Meh. I swap it every 30k in some of our rigs but, they are 48/68RE Dodge crap that is pulling around 30k pounds all the time.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:42:49 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By GearForGuns:
At 108k I would recommend a trans service. I would also recommend having the service done at a toyota dealer. I am a toyota master diagnostic tech though so I may be a little biased BUT I've seen the damage done by shops not having a clue how to change it properly.
View Quote


Knowing the quality of "average" mechanics or people in general I bet a lot of "the transmission was fine until we changed the fluid ergo changing the fluid wrecked the transmission" is actually the fluid changer not the fluid being changed.that caused the problem.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:43:10 PM EST
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Originally Posted By FALARAK:


The transmission fluid change on my wife's Acura is only $70 at the dealer. That's cheap. The factory interval is every 60k. It certainly will not hurt to keep fresh and clean fluid in there, and even every 30k is not that extreme.

Now, even if it is costing you $150 per change, and every 30k you change it, at 150k miles that's 5 changes, or $750. You aint gonna get any kind of transmission rebuild for that kinda money.
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Originally Posted By FALARAK:
Originally Posted By glockfan45:
Originally Posted By MyAliyah:
I've been told by the shops that, on mine, every 30k. I keep up on it. So far no problems. '97 Explorer Sport, 2000 F150. Of course I believe everything the shops tell me.


They love you for it.


The transmission fluid change on my wife's Acura is only $70 at the dealer. That's cheap. The factory interval is every 60k. It certainly will not hurt to keep fresh and clean fluid in there, and even every 30k is not that extreme.

Now, even if it is costing you $150 per change, and every 30k you change it, at 150k miles that's 5 changes, or $750. You aint gonna get any kind of transmission rebuild for that kinda money.


Acura probably only does a drain and fill which is just fine. It doesn't remove all the fluid, but it keeps it fresh enough for good service. Transmissions don't have to deal with the byproducts of combustion like the engine does. Fluids last awhile and putting a little fresh fluid in helps out. A drain and fill on my Nissan Titan is about $95 at the dealer.

Before Nissan recommended against transmission flushes most dealers offered the flush service for around $300. Dealers make a lot of money on the flushing services, but in most cases are completely unnecessary for most vehicles.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:43:19 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/28/2013 4:50:57 PM EST by GearForGuns]
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Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:45:25 PM EST
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