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11/20/2019 5:07:11 PM
Posted: 4/15/2006 11:54:34 PM EST
Is it possible to look up someone cell #
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 12:33:30 AM EST
Uh, no. Not only is it a huge security/privacy concern, but mobile numbers are re-used constantly. The directory would be instantly obsolete.
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 1:12:43 AM EST
In the United States, there is no open + centralized registry of mobile phone numbers at all. Not even on a state-by-state basis.

-I bet if you were a telemarketer you could buy it though.
~
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 1:29:12 AM EST
Google the person's name, you might get lucky. Has worked for me more than once.
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 9:52:33 AM EST

Originally Posted By MMcCall:
Uh, no. Not only is it a huge security/privacy concern, but mobile numbers are re-used constantly. The directory would be instantly obsolete.


-Well, , , no. Not really.
Every mobile phone company must be able to track who has what numbers, right?
They could just set up a public/free web server you could get on to look.

-I mean, that is, , , if they were required to by law of course. Elsewise they just do as they do now--they keep the data "secret" and sell it to marketing firms.
~
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 11:03:29 AM EST

Originally Posted By Floppy_833:

Originally Posted By MMcCall:
Uh, no. Not only is it a huge security/privacy concern, but mobile numbers are re-used constantly. The directory would be instantly obsolete.


-Well, , , no. Not really.
Every mobile phone company must be able to track who has what numbers, right?
They could just set up a public/free web server you could get on to look.

-I mean, that is, , , if they were required to by law of course. Elsewise they just do as they do now--they keep the data "secret" and sell it to marketing firms.
~



If you knew the persons name and what service they had (IE: Nextel or Cingular), a cell phone dealer who sells that same service could look it up on his computer. However, it is not legal for him to do.
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 4:47:30 PM EST

Originally Posted By Floppy_833:

Originally Posted By MMcCall:
Uh, no. Not only is it a huge security/privacy concern, but mobile numbers are re-used constantly. The directory would be instantly obsolete.


-Well, , , no. Not really.
Every mobile phone company must be able to track who has what numbers, right?
They could just set up a public/free web server you could get on to look.

-I mean, that is, , , if they were required to by law of course. Elsewise they just do as they do now--they keep the data "secret" and sell it to marketing firms.
~



I can't speak for every provider, only the one I work for, but all customer data, not just their phone number, is closely and securely guarded. It is also never sold to marketing agencies.. we're actually suing a company in federal court right now for calling customer care and impersonating users to get their call records, then marketing to those people.
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 4:54:12 PM EST
We had an employee vanish (open police case after 8 years)

She had an employeer supplied and paid for cell phone

They would not turn the records over to the Police until we had given them a notorized statement authorizing release of the info. Next step would have been a court order

Of course my mom has called a couple of times and made payments on mine (because I used my cell phone doing work for her) without my knowdelge or consent. I guess they will bend the rules to take money.
Link Posted: 4/19/2006 12:30:28 AM EST
[Last Edit: 4/19/2006 12:30:49 AM EST by MMcCall]

Originally Posted By uafgrad:
We had an employee vanish (open police case after 8 years)

She had an employeer supplied and paid for cell phone

They would not turn the records over to the Police until we had given them a notorized statement authorizing release of the info. Next step would have been a court order

Of course my mom has called a couple of times and made payments on mine (because I used my cell phone doing work for her) without my knowdelge or consent. I guess they will bend the rules to take money.



Let's see, call records and taking a payment. Guess which one is a privacy violation, and which one isn't?

Here's a hint: the bank will let you deposit money into anyone else's account too, but you can't get their balance.
Link Posted: 4/19/2006 3:06:39 AM EST

Originally Posted By shocktrp:

Originally Posted By Floppy_833:

Originally Posted By MMcCall:
Uh, no. Not only is it a huge security/privacy concern, but mobile numbers are re-used constantly. The directory would be instantly obsolete.


-Well, , , no. Not really.
Every mobile phone company must be able to track who has what numbers, right?
They could just set up a public/free web server you could get on to look.

-I mean, that is, , , if they were required to by law of course. Elsewise they just do as they do now--they keep the data "secret" and sell it to marketing firms.
~



If you knew the persons name and what service they had (IE: Nextel or Cingular), a cell phone dealer who sells that same service could look it up on his computer. However, it is not legal for him to do.



+1

I got a weird call last year from this girls friends who I was kinda hanging out with/wanting to go out with. It was extremely weird, I called the cell phone company back and tried to get the owner of the cell phone (), said I was looking for a friends number and wanted to make sure it was this number, he said he couldnt do it.
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