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Posted: 1/28/2011 4:11:44 PM EDT
Brother is wondering if the POR 15 (expensive) is worth it for his project jeep.   Wants to do the interior with it (after replacing rusted out floor pans).   Thinks he needs 1 qt for a couple of coats (and any exposed metal underneath the floor pans), and says it'll be about $35 to $40 for it.  

Any other options, or is it worth the $$ to just go with POR?

Thanks!


(He may bed line the interior, but he's not sure yet...).

AFARR
Link Posted: 1/28/2011 4:19:58 PM EDT
[#1]
I've heard there is nothing like that stuff if you prepare the metal correctly like it states int the directions.  If you live in the salt belt, it's best to do whatever you can to prevent rust.

Edit: Hell you live right up the road from me.  I live just across the PA line in Morgantown.  Damn salt ruined my truck within a year after I bought it.
Link Posted: 1/28/2011 4:20:53 PM EDT
[#2]
I've had good luck using Rust Cap and Rust Destroyer, you can get Rust Destroyer at Home Depot.

We used both on our HMMWVs that we used for beach ops and they work as good as POR for about half the price.
Link Posted: 1/28/2011 4:21:40 PM EDT
[#3]
using an epoxy primer works just as well.  Your not talking about painting over rust are you?  just preventing it?
Link Posted: 1/28/2011 4:24:52 PM EDT
[#4]
I've had good luck with Eastwood's Rust Encapsulator.

http://www.eastwood.com/rust-encapsulator.html

Link Posted: 1/28/2011 4:35:42 PM EDT
[#5]
Quoted:
using an epoxy primer works just as well.  Your not talking about painting over rust are you?  just preventing it?


No, not over "rust", however, he's talking about cutting out major rust holes, putting pre-cut sheet metal into the pans, welding down and painting with POR.    There might be some surface rust (however, he got a cheap angle grinder, so I think he's going to try for mostly bare metal in the whole interior).

AFARR
Link Posted: 1/28/2011 4:36:15 PM EDT
[#6]

Chassis Saver is a very good alternative (equivalent) in my experience.

Be sure to do the recommended surface prep for best results -clean, dry, and all loose rust removed...
Link Posted: 1/28/2011 4:37:43 PM EDT
[#7]
Quoted:
Brother is wondering if the POR 15 (expensive) is worth it for his project jeep.   Wants to do the interior with it (after replacing rusted out floor pans).   Thinks he needs 1 qt for a couple of coats (and any exposed metal underneath the floor pans), and says it'll be about $35 to $40 for it.  

Any other options, or is it worth the $$ to just go with POR?

Thanks!


(He may bed line the interior, but he's not sure yet...).

AFARR


no point in using POR 15 if he's replacing the panels.
Link Posted: 1/28/2011 4:41:02 PM EDT
[#8]
POR is good for a couple of things. No. 1- converting rust to inert. No. 2- it is harder than fuck, you can beat on it with a hammer and it will not crack. If your friend is replacing rust with patch panels. I'd recommend regular paint, no need for the added expense of POR on the inside.

Here's what I'd do if the body is coming off and the rust is being replaced...
POR on the frame, axles, and suspension. Tough stuff, will stand up to almost anything.
Underside of the body, spray on bedliner. Good insulation for sound and heat, very durable.
Inside the body (floorpans, dash), primer and then single stage paint. I had a Scout II with bedliner inside and out. While bedliner is good insulation and a tough finish, it is hard to make look clean. If you don't mind the floors looking dirty, use bedliner. If you want the inside to look clean from time to time, use paint.

That's just what I'd do. Remove all surface rust before painting. If you use bedliner anywhere outside where exposed to sun, use the UV protectant or it will fade. Don't get bedliner on your hands and then go take a leak.
Link Posted: 1/28/2011 4:41:58 PM EDT
[#9]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Brother is wondering if the POR 15 (expensive) is worth it for his project jeep.   Wants to do the interior with it (after replacing rusted out floor pans).   Thinks he needs 1 qt for a couple of coats (and any exposed metal underneath the floor pans), and says it'll be about $35 to $40 for it.  

Any other options, or is it worth the $$ to just go with POR?

Thanks!


(He may bed line the interior, but he's not sure yet...).

AFARR


no point in using POR 15 if he's replacing the panels.


There's some surface rust (dampness?) in the whole interior...looks like the carpet got damp at one point, so if he does the 'pan' part, there may be a few small rust patches along the sides/trans tunnel area...from what he's describing, he wants it to last a long time (CJ era jeep) as a fun vehicle.    So, he wants to do it right the first time instead of dealing with it again in a few years...

AFARR
Link Posted: 1/28/2011 4:44:28 PM EDT
[#10]
I've used POR-15 and Eastwood's products, too.  I use the POR-15 silver, it has fine aluminum in it, I think it gives it more flex –– won't crack or chip as easily as the POR-15 black.  The chassis black I found to be excellent on the undercarriage.



A little bit goes a long way.  A quart may be too much.  Once you open the can and atmospheric moisture gets in, it will begin to cure.  A can lasts up to six months after being opened.  Follow the instructions, never dip your brush into the can, pour out into a second container.  Prepping is extremely important.  When I did use their marine clean and acid prep solutions, it did bond better to metal, though I suspect that any good detergent and phosphoric acid prep would work just as well.  If you do the multiple coats, you do have to get the "tack" feel just right.  Too wet and the second coat will lift, too dry and the second coat will peel.  After a couple of bad recoat experiences, I just started to let it completely cure and use their etching primer between coats.  Haven't had a problem.
Link Posted: 1/28/2011 4:47:48 PM EDT
[#11]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Brother is wondering if the POR 15 (expensive) is worth it for his project jeep.   Wants to do the interior with it (after replacing rusted out floor pans).   Thinks he needs 1 qt for a couple of coats (and any exposed metal underneath the floor pans), and says it'll be about $35 to $40 for it.  

Any other options, or is it worth the $$ to just go with POR?

Thanks!


(He may bed line the interior, but he's not sure yet...).

AFARR


no point in using POR 15 if he's replacing the panels.


There's some surface rust (dampness?) in the whole interior...looks like the carpet got damp at one point, so if he does the 'pan' part, there may be a few small rust patches along the sides/trans tunnel area...from what he's describing, he wants it to last a long time (CJ era jeep) as a fun vehicle.    So, he wants to do it right the first time instead of dealing with it again in a few years...

AFARR


Don't do patches and use a band aid on the rest.
Link Posted: 1/28/2011 4:56:29 PM EDT
[#12]
POR-15 is good stuff.  Sometimes you just have to bite the bullet
Link Posted: 1/28/2011 5:08:29 PM EDT
[#13]
In HS I had a 77 Chevelle that the drivers side floor pan was rusting out.  I used a road sign as the material to fill the pan as they do not rust.  Those will take up the amount of surface area that would rust and the areas that you may need POR.
Link Posted: 1/28/2011 5:22:17 PM EDT
[#14]
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 7:36:48 AM EDT
[#15]
Quoted:
He's restoring a Jeep, and is going to balk at $40 bucks for a damn fine product?

Buy the POR15.


Figured that might be the case....but he wasn't sure if the POR is more hype (i.e....there's other stuff that is cheaper that works as well or better) or the real shit.

AFARR
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 8:42:11 AM EDT
[#16]
I work in this field and por 15 is ok  but SEM RUST MORT  is cheaper and is a better product.
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 8:47:32 AM EDT
[#17]
Quoted:
I work in this field and por 15 is ok  but SEM RUST MORT  is cheaper and is a better product.


I use Rust Mort also. No complaints. I use a sprayer underneath but I wear a respirator and cover myself head to toe with a tyvek suit because the stuff is NASTY if it gets all over you or you breathe it.
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 1:44:43 PM EDT
[#18]
I looked up Rust Mort....looks like it's a liquid to convert rust to sealed metal.   Wouldn't work over paint or new metal would it?   Probably not a bad thing to use on his frame, etc. to prevent future rust issues, however...

Their Rust Seal appears to be the same as the POR (and is priced close).  

Thanks!

AFARR
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 2:57:31 PM EDT
[#19]
I did a full CJ-7 restoration. I used POR-15 w/ POR Topcoat on the frame. POR is a thicker product, and has more flex and contact resistance than regular paint imo. So I figured for a frame that would be ideal. WEAR A RESPIRATOR!! Even if you are painting something small with a brush. This stuff smells like 1000 black magic markers in your nose, and since it's a urethane based epoxy, the particles will cure inside your lungs from the moisture and give you respiratory problems. Ask me how I know. It's also messy, and if prep isn't followed 100% to the "T" it will peel off in sheets. More for old rusty and pitted metal than for new, since the rust and pitting give it something hook to.

After doing my frame, I didn't really want to use POR-15 on the whole tub. Then I discovered Master Series industrial coatings. They use this stuff on bridges and Subway cars so I figured it would be good for my Jeep. I only plan on doing it once. It is an excellent line of products, and I actually spoke with the owner/inventor when I called to ask some questions. Reasonably priced, and worked beautifully. I have not had a single paint failure or seen a speck of rust.

http://www.masterseriescoatings.com/index/

If hes only doing floor pans, a pint of POR will be plenty. A little goes a long way.

Also, if he's going to do bed liner, you absolutely want to do the rustproofing first. Have him look into UPOL Raptor. It is the best DIY bed liner kit you can buy. It has the UV protectant so it doesn't fade or break down. A complete kit is around $110.

ETA: UPOL Raptor after application. My buddy stripped his tub out and did the UPOL after seeing how mine turned out. It's great stuff.



Link Posted: 1/29/2011 3:02:43 PM EDT
[#20]
I've had good results with Zero Rust. It is a non-permeable primer. I have parts in my garage that have been primed with it and are like the day I did them.
I've used POR 15 on battery trays. Very durable but wear gloves and clothes you don't care about.
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 3:02:58 PM EDT
[#21]
Quoted:
Quoted:
He's restoring a Jeep, and is going to balk at $40 bucks for a damn fine product?

Buy the POR15.


Figured that might be the case....but he wasn't sure if the POR is more hype (i.e....there's other stuff that is cheaper that works as well or better) or the real shit.

AFARR



There is no substitute.  POR15 is unique.
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 3:09:53 PM EDT
[#22]
Check out Rust bullet. I've had better luck with it performance wise, but of course prep is everything with coatings. Forgot the price. Summit had it.
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 5:10:05 PM EDT
[#23]



Quoted:


I did a full CJ-7 restoration. I used POR-15 w/ POR Topcoat on the frame. POR is a thicker product, and has more flex and contact resistance than regular paint imo. So I figured for a frame that would be ideal. WEAR A RESPIRATOR!! Even if you are painting something small with a brush. This stuff smells like 1000 black magic markers in your nose, and since it's a urethane based epoxy, the particles will cure inside your lungs from the moisture and give you respiratory problems. Ask me how I know. It's also messy, and if prep isn't followed 100% to the "T" it will peel off in sheets. More for old rusty and pitted metal than for new, since the rust and pitting give it something hook to.



After doing my frame, I didn't really want to use POR-15 on the whole tub. Then I discovered Master Series industrial coatings. They use this stuff on bridges and Subway cars so I figured it would be good for my Jeep. I only plan on doing it once. It is an excellent line of products, and I actually spoke with the owner/inventor when I called to ask some questions. Reasonably priced, and worked beautifully. I have not had a single paint failure or seen a speck of rust.



http://www.masterseriescoatings.com/index/



If hes only doing floor pans, a pint of POR will be plenty. A little goes a long way.



Also, if he's going to do bed liner, you absolutely want to do the rustproofing first. Have him look into UPOL Raptor. It is the best DIY bed liner kit you can buy. It has the UV protectant so it doesn't fade or break down. A complete kit is around $110.



ETA: UPOL Raptor after application. My buddy stripped his tub out and did the UPOL after seeing how mine turned out. It's great stuff.



http://img98.imageshack.us/img98/453/dsc02058pp.jpg







+1 and I have used both, but the MS covered easier and further then the POR




 
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 5:11:09 PM EDT
[#24]
I only trust POR15.
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 7:08:43 PM EDT
[#25]
Its real simple. Dry strip(sand blast,bead blast, walnut shells, ect,ect,ect) Then POR, right there in the blasters shop if poss. If not, As soon as you get it home. POR loves clean metal.
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 8:06:45 PM EDT
[#26]
This raises a question:  would a zink (like those used on a boat) work on a vehicle in a salt enviroment?
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 8:12:48 PM EDT
[#27]



Quoted:


POR is good for a couple of things. No. 1- converting rust to inert. No. 2- it is harder than fuck, you can beat on it with a hammer and it will not crack. If your friend is replacing rust with patch panels. I'd recommend regular paint, no need for the added expense of POR on the inside.



Here's what I'd do if the body is coming off and the rust is being replaced...

POR on the frame, axles, and suspension. Tough stuff, will stand up to almost anything.

Underside of the body, spray on bedliner. Good insulation for sound and heat, very durable.

Inside the body (floorpans, dash), primer and then single stage paint. I had a Scout II with bedliner inside and out. While bedliner is good insulation and a tough finish, it is hard to make look clean. If you don't mind the floors looking dirty, use bedliner. If you want the inside to look clean from time to time, use paint.



That's just what I'd do. Remove all surface rust before painting. If you use bedliner anywhere outside where exposed to sun, use the UV protectant or it will fade. Don't get bedliner on your hands and then go take a leak.


Very true.  I love POR-15, I've used pretty much all of their products at one time or another.



 
Link Posted: 1/29/2011 8:42:26 PM EDT
[#28]
POR-15 is worth it.


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