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Posted: 10/31/2006 8:22:23 AM EST
Is there any way to make your body more immune to the effects of radiation? If you started in small dosage exposure and slowly increased, would your body build up a tolerance, or would you just slowly kill yourself? We are already immune to carbon 15 radiation, so why couldn't we become immune to uranium?
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 8:23:58 AM EST
this seems like a really bad idea

as if all those paint fumes arent bad enough now you want to expose yourself to radiation!
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 8:24:26 AM EST
No. Radiation is cumalative. If you keep exposing yourself to small doses, it all adds up to a big dose that gives you radiation poisoning or cancer.
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 8:25:54 AM EST
No, radiation isn't a toxin that the body can process. Radiation causes damage at the cellular/genetic level. You'd be as likely to become resistant to bullets, and trying to test that theory will yield the same results.
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 8:26:08 AM EST
Not that I know of.. I know they are watching me closely on the number of CT's and xrays I get each year after Radiation treatment on my leg.. You don't want to get radiation sickness. it sucks..
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 8:26:41 AM EST

Originally Posted By Swindle1984:

No. Radiation is cumalative. If you keep exposing yourself to small doses, it all adds up to a big dose that gives you radiation poisoning or cancer.


+1
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 8:26:41 AM EST
Already noted - answer is NOPE!!

Link Posted: 10/31/2006 8:26:43 AM EST

Originally Posted By Swindle1984:
No. Radiation is cumalative. If you keep exposing yourself to small doses, it all adds up to a big dose that gives you radiation poisoning or cancer.



Shhhhh...... He was going to take himself out of the Gene Pool.
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 8:27:36 AM EST

Originally Posted By CasualObserver:
No, radiation isn't a toxin that the body can process. Radiation causes damage at the cellular/genetic level. You'd be as likely to become resistant to bullets, and trying to test that theory will yield the same results.


Dammit! You answered my next question too.
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 8:28:00 AM EST
I think that would be the same as trying to build up your immunity to fire.
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 8:28:12 AM EST
As a highly trained middle school science teacher, permit me to add my voice to the chorus of.....Nopes!
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 8:29:14 AM EST

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:

Originally Posted By Swindle1984:

No. Radiation is cumalative. If you keep exposing yourself to small doses, it all adds up to a big dose that gives you radiation poisoning or cancer.


+1


+2

Radiation is not something to play around with. You never really get better. it just keeps building up.
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 8:29:26 AM EST

Originally Posted By CasualObserver:
No, radiation isn't a toxin that the body can process. Radiation causes damage at the cellular/genetic level. You'd be as likely to become resistant to bullets, and trying to test that theory will yield the same results.


I guess I should stop having my friends throw bullets at me.. I was just building up a tolerance.

<­BR>

Hey.. they won't stop!
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 8:29:48 AM EST
Maybe if you're a cockroach.
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 8:30:19 AM EST


no
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 8:30:19 AM EST
Go ahead. You know you want to try it.
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 8:31:31 AM EST
This was a good question. You should have followed it up with "can your body build up a tolerance to multiple knife stab wounds to the heart".
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 8:32:17 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/31/2006 8:33:18 AM EST by DukeSnookems]

Originally Posted By shop_rat45:
Is there any way to make your body more immune to the effects of radiation? If you started in small dosage exposure and slowly increased, would your body build up a tolerance, or would you just slowly kill yourself? We are already immune to carbon 15 radiation, so why couldn't we become immune to uranium?


It's carbon 14, not 15, and it emits beta radiation. Big diff between that and the radiation from uranium.

Immunity from diseases is accomplished by your body's immune system creating antibodies to identify the pathogen. antibodies don't do anything to stop gamma radiation from zipping through your body and mangling DNA.

ETA: Also the decay rate with C14 is very slow.
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 8:33:36 AM EST

Originally Posted By JoseyWales:
This was a good question. You should have followed it up with "can your body build up a tolerance to multiple knife stab wounds to the heart".


Come on! Ease up a bit. It ain't a bad question. Your body can build up tolerances to many other things including arsenic. Why not radiation? I had to ask.
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 8:33:40 AM EST
An easy way to think about this is as if radiation is really billions and billions of little bullets coming at you in waves. If you shoot an elephant with some .22LR for a few weeks, do you think it will be able to withstand a 75mm shelling? Not so much. Not only is that shelling going to make the elephant goo, prior to the shelling, the elephant will still be feeling the annoying pain of the damage caused by the .22.

Radiation literally tears through you.
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 8:37:07 AM EST

Originally Posted By DukeSnookems:

Originally Posted By shop_rat45:
Is there any way to make your body more immune to the effects of radiation? If you started in small dosage exposure and slowly increased, would your body build up a tolerance, or would you just slowly kill yourself? We are already immune to carbon 15 radiation, so why couldn't we become immune to uranium?


It's carbon 14, not 15, and it emits beta radiation. Big diff between that and the radiation from uranium.

Immunity from diseases is accomplished by your body's immune system creating antibodies to identify the pathogen. antibodies don't do anything to stop gamma radiation from zipping through your body and mangling DNA.

ETA: Also the decay rate with C14 is very slow.


Thanks for the detailed response. I appreciate it and I now know more.
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 8:39:04 AM EST

Originally Posted By shop_rat45:
Is there any way to make your body more immune to the effects of radiation? If you started in small dosage exposure and slowly increased, would your body build up a tolerance, or would you just slowly kill yourself? We are already immune to carbon 15 radiation, so why couldn't we become immune to uranium?



Why don't you go test it on yourself.

Oh and if *cough* WHEN *cough* you die will you leave me your guns?

Radiation is NO joke. It chews up your genetic code and all sorts of other horific things.
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 9:44:25 AM EST

Originally Posted By Swindle1984:
No. Radiation is cumalative. If you keep exposing yourself to small doses, it all adds up to a big dose that gives you radiation poisoning or cancer.


Think of radiation as very small bulits going into your cells and damaging them...there is no way for a cell to resist that.
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 9:46:13 AM EST
do you have kids already? the radiation would kill all your swimmers
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 9:47:27 AM EST
sure, thats what the tumors are for! didnt you know that?
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 3:59:44 PM EST

Originally Posted By ghengiskhabb:

Originally Posted By Swindle1984:
No. Radiation is cumalative. If you keep exposing yourself to small doses, it all adds up to a big dose that gives you radiation poisoning or cancer.



Shhhhh...... He was going to take himself out of the Gene Pool.


I guess between him and that guy who wanted to bleach his teeth white by gargling Clorox, I really should keep my mouth shut.
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 4:06:48 PM EST
Were just messing with you Shop Rat
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 4:10:48 PM EST


Link Posted: 10/31/2006 4:18:30 PM EST

Originally Posted By shop_rat45:

Originally Posted By JoseyWales:
This was a good question. You should have followed it up with "can your body build up a tolerance to multiple knife stab wounds to the heart".


Come on! Ease up a bit. It ain't a bad question. Your body can build up tolerances to many other things including arsenic. Why not radiation? I had to ask.


ok.. then.. radiation.. not much of a need in everyday life to build up resistance to that. bout how bout fire? now there's a useful tolerance. start with.. dunno.. hot wax, work your way up through candle flame on your hands, mayhap dip your leg in gas, sit it alight, work on up to partila body boilings into hot oil, and gasoline fires and maybe chemical fires. once there you could hire yourself out as a sort of supper fireman or rescue person...

personally though.. im thinking bout working up resistance to gravity... just think of the posibilitis.. heck you could go live in a black hole.. course, no one would prolly come visit...

Link Posted: 10/31/2006 4:21:15 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/31/2006 4:35:25 PM EST by bonepickerx]
No never ever... Radiation does not enter your body like a virus . Normally when a foriegn substance enters your body it can be preocessed, attacked, delt with. Radiation is something that can't be processed so your body can not build up an immunity too it. Most radiation travels through your body at very high speeds and may deposit large amounts of energy into your body. When neutron or gamma radiation travel through your body they dissrupt and even destroy your body at the cellular level. Alpha particles are normally stopped by your skin but can be inhaled and will cause problems if inhaled or absobed into your body in large amounts. You are made up of mostly water, water is a very good moderator so neutron radiation is thermalized as it travels through your body. It deposits thermal energy which is one of the causes of radiation poisioning. Gamma radiation affects you in much the same way as neutron radiation but by a different process. Beta is alot like alpha but a bit more destructive. Beta is not as easy to absorb. The reason alpha can be destrucive is that it can enter through membranes likes your eyes. Alpha inhalltion usually results in alpha particles being lodged in your lungs wher they sit and decay.
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 4:22:49 PM EST
It will knock some of your e-'s out of their orbits and you will grow an extra arm or turn into one of the x-men.
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 4:32:02 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/31/2006 4:33:51 PM EST by DocH]

Originally Posted By shop_rat45:
Is there any way to make your body more immune to the effects of radiation? If you started in small dosage exposure and slowly increased, would your body build up a tolerance, or would you just slowly kill yourself? We are already immune to carbon 15 radiation, so why couldn't we become immune to uranium?


The cells in your body are already fairly tolerant of low levels of ionizing radiation. There are chemical and molecular repair mechanisms in the cell that automatically repair your DNA when any damage, either from ionizing radiation (background radiation) or noxious chemicals in the environment, occur.

These repair mechanisms can be overwhelmed, however, and fail; resulting in cellular death, or harmful mutation (cancer).

The federal agencies that regulate radiation operate on a "linear no-threshold" principle that NO level of ionizing radiation, no matter how miniscule, is "safe". Radiation workers use the "ALARA" (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle to minimize occupational exposure.

There is some scientific literature, however, that suggests very low levels of exposure are actually beneficial, by stimulating these repair mechanisms; known as hormesis.

For example, there is a subset of people exposed to radiation at Hiroshima and Nagasaki who had a lower incidence of cancer compared to the non-exposed general population.

The bottom line though, is that you cannot become "immune" or build up a "tolerance" to radiation. Over a certain low level of exposure, the effects are detrimental, and cumulative over a lifetime.

Doc H.
Link Posted: 10/31/2006 4:41:38 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/31/2006 4:43:34 PM EST by bonepickerx]

Originally Posted By DocH:

Originally Posted By shop_rat45:
Is there any way to make your body more immune to the effects of radiation? If you started in small dosage exposure and slowly increased, would your body build up a tolerance, or would you just slowly kill yourself? We are already immune to carbon 15 radiation, so why couldn't we become immune to uranium?


The cells in your body are already fairly tolerant of low levels of ionizing radiation. There are chemical and molecular repair mechanisms in the cell that automatically repair your DNA when any damage, either from ionizing radiation (background radiation) or noxious chemicals in the environment, occur.

These repair mechanisms can be overwhelmed, however, and fail; resulting in cellular death, or harmful mutation (cancer).

The federal agencies that regulate radiation operate on a "linear no-threshold" principle that NO level of ionizing radiation, no matter how miniscule, is "safe". Radiation workers use the "ALARA" (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle to minimize occupational exposure.

There is some scientific literature, however, that suggests very low levels of exposure are actually beneficial, by stimulating these repair mechanisms; known as hormesis.

For example, there is a subset of people exposed to radiation at Hiroshima and Nagasaki who had a lower incidence of cancer compared to the non-exposed general population.

The bottom line though, is that you cannot become "immune" or build up a "tolerance" to radiation. Over a certain low level of exposure, the effects are detrimental, and cumulative over a lifetime.

Doc H.


ALARA is a good rule but can be misleading if you do not know dose rates. Background radiation becomes more detrimental as you go up in altitude. Most people get the highest doses they will ever get when flying on commercial airliners. Radiological workers are normally affected the most. I have often wondered how high the dose rate is for the people we send into space. Cosmic radiation is the most common exposure most people receive in a lifetime. Ionizing radiation occurs in several places that most people outside of the nuclear industry would not suspect. Cumulative is the key word in all of this. Lead and other poisons are also cumulative.

Good explanation Doc!
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