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Posted: 10/7/2004 7:43:47 AM EST
It'll sound silly, buy I always have trouble determining when to drop the "e" at the end of a verb when adding "ing". Whats the rule?

Example:



to Stare (V. to look at with fixed eyes) ADD ING = StarEing
You keep the E

to Come (V. to move toward) ADD ING = coming
You lose the E

Thanks!
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 7:45:47 AM EST
TAG
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 7:46:50 AM EST
where are the grammer nazis now???? huh???? huh????


biotches!!!!!

Link Posted: 10/7/2004 7:47:24 AM EST

Originally Posted By mtechgunman:
where are the grammer nazis now???? huh???? huh????


biotches!!!!!




I know!
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 7:49:22 AM EST
Actually, it IS 'staring'.

Link Posted: 10/7/2004 7:50:43 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 7:50:45 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/7/2004 7:52:16 AM EST by fight4yourrights]

Originally Posted By mtechgunman:

where are the grammer nazis now???? huh???? huh????




GrammAr ding dong.


"The Spelling Nazi"
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 7:50:54 AM EST

Originally Posted By DDiggler:
Actually, it IS 'staring'.




damn grammar nazis...
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 7:52:10 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 7:53:11 AM EST
I dont know. I'm still waiting for someone to explain if it is more proper to say "Hard ons," or "Hards on."
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 7:55:38 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 7:56:07 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/7/2004 7:56:29 AM EST by mjohn3006]

Originally Posted By gaspasser:
I dont know. I'm still waiting for someone to explain if it is more proper to say "Hard ons," or "Hards on."



Kind of like RBI's is the same as saying Run Batted Ins.

RBI's should be R'sBI

But Football is on now, so screw baseball.
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 7:58:08 AM EST

Originally Posted By gaspasser:
I dont know. I'm still waiting for someone to explain if it is more proper to say "Hard ons," or "Hards on."



The s normally indcates plural. If you are talking about having wood, you have a hard on. If you meant at that fashion show, multiple hard on's may be the correct term.
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 7:58:19 AM EST

Originally Posted By brouhaha:
You might understand it better if you spelled STARING correctly.

www.fortunecity.com/bally/durrus/153/gramch03.html

dictionary.reference.com/search?q=stare




Sweet that explains it all. Thank you!
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 8:04:16 AM EST
It be thred, CB
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 8:07:28 AM EST

Originally Posted By CavVet:

Originally Posted By gaspasser:
I dont know. I'm still waiting for someone to explain if it is more proper to say "Hard ons," or "Hards on."



The s normally indcates plural. If you are talking about having wood, you have a hard on. If you meant at that fashion show, multiple hard on's may be the correct term.



Actually, "hard on" is an American slang term.
As such you may technically add the "s" at the end of either word if you want. Though I believe that in the common context of American usage the acceptable term would be "hard-ons" with a hyphen added.

In official English dictionaries you will find that "hard on" actually means "hard upon." Deal severely with, cause damage to. Which is not the context which you are referring to.
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 8:23:44 AM EST

Originally Posted By CAMPYBOB:
your loosing me on this thread.

their are nothing i can do to prolly splain this to you.




Link Posted: 10/7/2004 11:36:17 AM EST

Originally Posted By AeroE:
It be ah thred, CB



Link Posted: 10/7/2004 11:38:38 AM EST
Sorry, meng. Yo no hablo ingles.

Me no espeeke de eenglich.
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 11:43:04 AM EST
oh yea- its November 7 NOT november 7th

its like saying november seventh...th
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 11:48:43 AM EST

Originally Posted By Lockedon:
It'll sound silly, buy I always have trouble determining when to drop the "e" at the end of a verb when adding "ing". Whats the rule?

Example:



to Stare (V. to look at with fixed eyes) ADD ING = StarEing
You keep the E

to Come (V. to move toward) ADD ING = coming
You lose the E

Thanks!



Damn, I thought it was spelled cumming
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 11:53:53 AM EST

Originally Posted By CavVet:

Originally Posted By gaspasser:
I dont know. I'm still waiting for someone to explain if it is more proper to say "Hard ons," or "Hards on."



The s normally indcates plural. If you are talking about having wood, you have a hard on. If you meant at that fashion show, multiple hard on's may be the correct term.



Either way, the apostrophe is just wrong (unless you intend to suggest that the "hard on" or "hard ons" are in possession of something).

I suggest that "hard on" should be hyphenated (i.e., hard-on) and that the "s" should then go on the end for pluralization (i.e., hard-ons), but that is just my Grammar Nazi opinion...


(I can't believe I just wrote that. )
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 1:34:37 PM EST

Originally Posted By HardShell:
Either way, the apostrophe is just wrong (unless you intend to suggest that the "hard on" or "hard ons" are in possession of something).

I suggest that "hard on" should be hyphenated (i.e., hard-on) and that the "s" should then go on the end for pluralization (i.e., hard-ons), but that is just my Grammar Nazi opinion...


(I can't believe I just wrote that. )



I hated English classes, and was always selective inmy studies, i.e. important, non-important. The way I remember English rules going.....

's plural

s' posession, ownership.....

Have I been wrong all these years??
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 1:37:00 PM EST
The English Language has many rules but also has many exceptions.

MT
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 1:42:32 PM EST

I hated English classes, and was always selective inmy studies, i.e. important, non-important. The way I remember English rules going.....

's plural

s' posession, ownership.....

Have I been wrong all these years??

Yes.

"s" : plural
"'s" : singular posessive
"s'": plural posessive

The soldiers shot the Iraqi.
The Iraqi were shot by the soldiers' guns.
One of the soldier's guns left a big hole.
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 1:42:51 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 1:52:08 PM EST

Originally Posted By DDiggler:

I hated English classes, and was always selective inmy studies, i.e. important, non-important. The way I remember English rules going.....

's plural

s' posession, ownership.....

Have I been wrong all these years??

Yes.

"s" : plural
"'s" : singular posessive
"s'": plural posessive

The soldiers shot the Iraqi.
The Iraqi were shot by the soldiers' guns.
One of the soldier's guns left a big hole.



Correct! (Good examples, too! )
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 2:03:03 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/7/2004 2:03:33 PM EST by Lion_Dog]
Double the consonant: STAR = STARRING

Ends in vowel drop vowel add ING: STARE = STARING.

<­BR>



Wright?­??
Link Posted: 10/7/2004 11:42:39 PM EST

Originally Posted By DDiggler:Yes.

"s" : plural
"'s" : singular posessive
"s'": plural posessive

The soldiers shot the Iraqi.
The Iraqis were shot by the soldiers' guns.
One of the soldier's guns left a big hole.



Fixed it for ya.

And see, I told ya I didnt pay much attention in Englsh class, but I damn sure got it now. Thankx!


Link Posted: 10/7/2004 11:45:50 PM EST

Originally Posted By CAMPYBOB:
your loosing me on this thread.

their are nothing i can do to prolly splain this to you.



Link Posted: 10/7/2004 11:49:06 PM EST
Is there really anything wrong with describing something as the "most powerful one"
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 1:13:12 AM EST
Sounds better than "powerfullerest"!
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 1:14:50 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/8/2004 1:14:58 AM EST by Taxman]

Originally Posted By DDiggler:
Sounds better than "powerfullerest"!



Im more better than the most powerful one
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 8:49:36 AM EST

Originally Posted By Lockedon:
It'll sound silly, buy I always have trouble determining when to drop the "e" at the end of a verb when adding "ing". Whats the rule?

Example:

to Stare (V. to look at with fixed eyes) ADD ING = StarEing
You keep the E

to Come (V. to move toward) ADD ING = coming
You lose the E

Thanks!



If the verb ends in a 'silent' -e (not pronounced), then the present participle is formed by dropping this -e from the end of the verb and adding -ing.

leave = leaving, take = taking, receive = receiving

Verb ends with "ie", drop the "ie" and add "ying" lie ? lying, vie ? vying

If the verb ends in a 'pronounced' -e, just add the -ing.
free = freeing
knee = kneeing
flee = fleeing

Link Posted: 10/8/2004 9:02:39 AM EST


BigDozer66
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 9:31:05 AM EST

Originally Posted By DeadSled:
img.photobucket.com/albums/v373/BigDozer66/GrammerNinja.jpg



Cool photo!

BigDozer66
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 9:36:36 AM EST
And while we're at it, could we PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE STOP USING A FRIGGIN' APOSTROPHE TO DENOTE PLURAL!??!

An apostrophe is used to denote a missing letter(s), as in a contraction, or in "friggin'(g) above: "Sen. Kerry can't fool anyone with his I'm a hunter nonsense"

and to denote possession: "I shot Bob's AR."

AT NO TIME, in the ENGLISH LANGUAGE, should it be used to DENOTE PLURAL....even with an Acronym.

It's NOT VCR's, it's VCRs. The fact that you see this everywhere now is like nails on a chalkboard to me lol.

Oh, and there's a difference between "then" and "than"...as in: I'd rather be poked in the eye with a sharp stick THAN vote for a democrat. Use than to compare/contrast things.

After you do your homework, THEN you can go out to play. Use then for time/consequence.

And last but not least: even though some of us may pronounce it "I wish you would of told me that sooner", it's "would have"...it's the past conditional tense, would being the operative word for conditional tense, and have denoting past.

Ok, now that I got that off my chest, I feel MUCHmuch better

Stick with me, I'l learn youse all some good English.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 10:24:04 AM EST

Originally Posted By Fenian:
...

AT NO TIME, in the ENGLISH LANGUAGE, should it be used to DENOTE PLURAL....even with an Acronym.

It's NOT VCR's, it's VCRs. The fact that you see this everywhere now is like nails on a chalkboard to me lol.

...



AMEN!

It has become very commonly accepted in referring to decades (i.e. the 80's, the 90's, etc.). It might be appropriate if used in front ('80s, '90s) to denote the omission of the "19" but not the way it is currently used. IOW, it should be the 1980s or '80s, NOT the 1980's or 80's.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 10:46:19 AM EST
How about

"I could care less."

Grrrrr.... you COULD care less? Then you really must care, at least a little.

It's "I COULDN'T care less!"
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 10:47:34 AM EST

Originally Posted By DDiggler:
How about

"I could care less."

Grrrrr.... you COULD care less? Then you really must care, at least a little.

It's "I COULDN'T care less!"



The WORST - one of my BIGGEST pet peeves!
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 4:45:43 PM EST
If thats all you have to worry about then you must not have a job,a wife,a home morgauge,and kids to piss you off!!!

Bob

Link Posted: 10/8/2004 4:57:29 PM EST

Originally Posted By Fenian:
And while we're at it, could we PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE STOP USING A FRIGGIN' APOSTROPHE TO DENOTE PLURAL!??!



They use is as a warning: "Look out, 's' coming up!" (According to Dave Barry )



Link Posted: 10/8/2004 5:01:02 PM EST
on my TV guide it says MLB Baseball


Originally Posted By mjohn3006:

Originally Posted By gaspasser:
I dont know. I'm still waiting for someone to explain if it is more proper to say "Hard ons," or "Hards on."



Kind of like RBI's is the same as saying Run Batted Ins.

RBI's should be R'sBI

But Football is on now, so screw baseball.

Link Posted: 10/8/2004 5:06:30 PM EST

Originally Posted By DDiggler:

I hated English classes, and was always selective inmy studies, i.e. important, non-important. The way I remember English rules going.....

's plural

s' posession, ownership.....

Have I been wrong all these years??

Yes.

"s" : plural
"'s" : singular posessive
"s'": plural posessive

The soldiers shot the Iraqi.
The Iraqi were shot by the soldiers' guns.
One of the soldier's guns left a big hole.



Golf clap
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 5:10:09 PM EST

Originally Posted By Fenian:


And last but not least: even though some of us may pronounce it "I wish you would of told me that sooner", it's "would have"...it's the past conditional tense, would being the operative word for conditional tense, and have denoting past.

Ok, now that I got that off my chest, I feel MUCHmuch better

Stick with me, I'l learn youse all some good English.



Well then how come Mark Twain gots to write all dem novels with the bad 'rammar in 'em? And he's critically acclaimed!
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 5:25:29 PM EST
How about irregardless ?

Link Posted: 10/8/2004 5:55:02 PM EST

Originally Posted By Schulze:

Originally Posted By Fenian:


And last but not least: even though some of us may pronounce it "I wish you would of told me that sooner", it's "would have"...it's the past conditional tense, would being the operative word for conditional tense, and have denoting past.

Ok, now that I got that off my chest, I feel MUCHmuch better

Stick with me, I'l learn youse all some good English.



Well then how come Mark Twain gots to write all dem novels with the bad 'rammar in 'em? And he's critically acclaimed!



Because Twain wrote in dialect which means he wrote as it was spoken, not as it should have been.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 5:56:35 PM EST
I sometimes get the "skin-crawlies" when people use "me", "I", and "myself" improperly.
Examples;

"Myself and my wife went to the store".

"Report back to your mother and I".

"Bob and me are going to the store".

Some other classics I hate;


ATM Machine

UPC Code

GNC Center

Link Posted: 10/8/2004 10:10:26 PM EST

Originally Posted By Tallbob:
How about irregardless ?





Now you done quit proofreadin' and gone to meddlin'!
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 10:14:46 PM EST

Originally Posted By bobbyjack:
If thats all you have to worry about then you must not have a job,a wife,a home morgauge,and kids to piss you off!!!

Bob




(If you meant me...) 1 job, 1 wife, 3 mortgages (2 homes and a small farm), 1 son - none of which piss me off. I must admit I've been blessed with a good enough life to allow little things like bad grammar to annoy me.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 10:17:12 PM EST
Teh intrenert maeks u stooped
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