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Posted: 2/23/2007 2:07:45 PM EST
[Last Edit: 2/23/2007 2:07:54 PM EST by shop_rat45]
I've got 10 cat5e wired wall jacks in my house all coming back to a central structured wire system. The routers that the structured wiring manufacturer sells is only a 4 port router. Could I buy multiple routers and daisy chain them together? Any info is appreciated.

Thanks,
Kris
Link Posted: 2/23/2007 2:09:11 PM EST
You can. You need a crossover cable going to each port in the switch, unless if they have auto-crossing built in. You'll have to check your manual to see if they do.
Link Posted: 2/23/2007 2:14:53 PM EST
Most routers will have a WAN in on the back where your cables go. You can daisy chain them no problem.

Link Posted: 2/23/2007 2:17:24 PM EST
Yes, get yourself one basic 8-port router and you'll be able to provide 11 available ports.

I hope whatever hooks directly to your Internet connection has firewall functionality.
Link Posted: 2/23/2007 2:18:49 PM EST
Don't do that.

Get a single router and then buy a small switch to extend the ports out to the number you need.
Link Posted: 2/23/2007 2:20:31 PM EST

Originally Posted By brassburn:
Don't do that.

Get a single router and then buy a small switch to extend the ports out to the number you need.


thank God someone posted who knows what they are talking about
Link Posted: 2/23/2007 2:20:48 PM EST
you can do that, but your getting into an addressing and networking nightmare. if you want more than 3 computers in your house to all have the same addressing and be able to "see" each other you just need a 10+ port switch.

uplink the switch into the router and plug the rest of the computers into the switch. you can daisy chain switches up to 254 devices on only 1 router.
Link Posted: 2/23/2007 2:31:25 PM EST

Originally Posted By brassburn:
Don't do that.

Get a single router and then buy a small switch to extend the ports out to the number you need.


+1 these are also referred to as workgroup hubs and are pretty inexpensive
Link Posted: 2/23/2007 2:33:41 PM EST
Link Posted: 2/23/2007 2:37:47 PM EST
Slightly off topic but perhaps someone knows....

I was in a Wal Mart the other day walking past the computer accessories aisle and I happened to notice that all of the layer 2 type devices were marked "Hub" on the boxes. No mention of switching on the boxes whatsoever.

I have not purchased anything but layer 2 and 3 switches from the big boys in years so my question is:

Are they really making that horrifyingly inefficient multi-port repeater stuff again, or have they just begun using retro-terminology for market friendly reasons?
Link Posted: 2/23/2007 2:42:13 PM EST

Originally Posted By brassburn:
Slightly off topic but perhaps someone knows....

I was in a Wal Mart the other day walking past the computer accessories aisle and I happened to notice that all of the layer 2 type devices were marked "Hub" on the boxes. No mention of switching on the boxes whatsoever.

I have not purchased anything but layer 2 and 3 switches from the big boys in years so my question is:

Are they really making that horrifyingly inefficient multi-port repeater stuff again, or have they just begun using retro-terminology for market friendly reasons?


Yeah they still make hubs. One thing that no one has been able to explain to me is the 5 and 8 port switches. How can they be a switch if they dont pull or assinged an adress?
Link Posted: 2/23/2007 2:49:42 PM EST

Originally Posted By ARMALITE-FAN:

Yeah they still make hubs. One thing that no one has been able to explain to me is the 5 and 8 port switches. How can they be a switch if they dont pull or assinged an adress?



By pull or assign, I assume you mean either bind to an IP address given by a DHCP server or act as a DHCP server.

Typically those switches will not interact with anything beyond layer 2 transport. They essentially use tables populated with MAC addresses that are detected at each port to "switch" out traffic from one device (port) to the proper destination device (port). This avoids the broadcast nature of traffic in a hub.
Link Posted: 2/23/2007 2:52:41 PM EST
[Last Edit: 2/23/2007 3:09:52 PM EST by PeteCO]

Originally Posted By ARMALITE-FAN:

Originally Posted By brassburn:
Slightly off topic but perhaps someone knows....

I was in a Wal Mart the other day walking past the computer accessories aisle and I happened to notice that all of the layer 2 type devices were marked "Hub" on the boxes. No mention of switching on the boxes whatsoever.

I have not purchased anything but layer 2 and 3 switches from the big boys in years so my question is:

Are they really making that horrifyingly inefficient multi-port repeater stuff again, or have they just begun using retro-terminology for market friendly reasons?


Yeah they still make hubs. One thing that no one has been able to explain to me is the 5 and 8 port switches. How can they be a switch if they dont pull or assinged an adress?


A switch is a layer 2 device; a multiport bridge.
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