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9/19/2017 7:27:10 PM
Posted: 5/11/2003 1:07:42 PM EDT
These things are down below $300, and my buddy might be buying one. He has a pretty good DVD collection, and I'm thinking freebie time. Is it this easy or am I an idiot?
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 1:17:36 PM EDT
No, you can't...almost all DVD movies have copy protection and DVD burners will not copy them. They also won't copy factory-recorded VHS movies made since the early 90s. What you CAN do if you have cable movie channels is record them right off TV onto a DVD.
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 1:27:19 PM EDT
Copy protection? Give the cybergeeks some time and that will be as useless as tits on a boar. That's nothing but a challenge to those guys, and they will find a way around it. Count on it.
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 1:30:38 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Yankee1911: Copy protection? Give the cybergeeks some time and that will be as useless as tits on a boar. That's nothing but a challenge to those guys, and they will find a way around it. Count on it.
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Well, that works okay in a DVD burner that's installed in your PC, but I thought (maybe I was mistaken) that we were speaking of the stand-alone models, VCR-type deals. With those, the copy protection is hardwired into the machine and would be much more difficult to overcome.
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 1:38:11 PM EDT
Yes you can, but it is a long drawn out process if you don't have a fast computer (2.0 Ghz +) with lots of RAM (memory- at least 512 MB) There are various "hacker" specials out there that allow you to "rip" DVD's to your hard disk. You can choose if you want the bonus features, subtitles, etc. You then split the tracks on to 2 CD ROMs and you get two watchable discs on your hard rive, computer DVD player/recorder, or on your console DVD player in VCD format if your DVD player supports it. You can also do a stripped down version of the movie (less resolution and frame rate etc.) to get it to fit on a DVD- but it may look like a worn out VHS tape quality. Not the greatest copy and time consuming. There was (or still is) a program being sold by most major electronics retailers (Fry's , Circuit City, Best Buy, etc.) called DVD X-Copy. The company is being sued by some movie industry types because of the ability to temporarily disable the copy protection when ripping the movie track. I looked into this when I was thinking of just renting DVD's and then copying them. It's sort of a headace.
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 1:42:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/11/2003 1:42:54 PM EDT by Max_Mike]
Yes you can and it is easy: With a computer DVD burner and 321 Studios DVD-X-Copy ($99) you can copy most DVD movies, but with many movies it will take 2 DVD recordable disks to get the entire move. This is because a many DVDs hold 9GB not 4.7GB like the recordable DVD disc. 321 Studios has a new product DVD-X-Copy XPRESS ($50) that will supposedly get almost all DVD copied to one disk without quality loss but you lose the menus. I use DVD-X-Copy and the process is painless/easy, requires only basic computer skills, and is almost idiot proof. Depending on the speed of your DVD burner it can take form 30 min. to 1+ hour Link: [url]http://www.dvdxcopy.com/index.htm[/url]
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 1:56:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/11/2003 1:57:30 PM EDT by cyanide]
Max Mike is the winner, yes , with the above software it will record .
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 1:56:45 PM EDT
Not that you probably care, but it's a Federal crime to copy a copy-protected DVD. It's not that having a copy is illegal, but the process of breaking the copy-protection that's illegal. You probably have as much chance of being busted by the Fed for having "evil features" on you post-ban AR as you have for being busted for breaking DVD copy-protection. Almost 0%. Good luck! [img]photos.ar15.com/ImageGallery/IG_LoadImage.asp?iImageUnq=476[/img] [url=www.nra.org][b][red]NRA[/red][/url] [url=www.nra.org][blue]Life Member[/blue][/url] [url=www.gunowners.org][b][red]GOA[/red] [/url] [url=www.gunowners.org][blue]Life Member[/blue][/url] [url=www.saf.org][red]SAF[/red][/url] [url=www.saf.org][blue]Supporter[/blue][/url] [url=sas-aim.org][red]SAS[/red][/url] [url=sas-aim.org][blue]Supporter[/blue][/b][/url]
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 1:58:12 PM EDT
Originally Posted By USPC40: Not that you probably care, but it's a Federal crime to copy a copy-protected DVD. It's not that having a copy is illegal, but the process of breaking the copy-protection that's illegal. You probably have as much chance of being busted by the Fed for having "evil features" on you post-ban AR as you have for being busted for breaking DVD copy-protection. Almost 0%. Good luck! [url]photos.ar15.com/ImageGallery/IG_LoadImage.asp?iImageUnq=476[/url] [url=www.nra.org][b][red]NRA[/red][/url] [url=www.nra.org][blue]Life Member[/blue][/url] [url=www.gunowners.org][b][red]GOA[/red] [/url] [url=www.gunowners.org][blue]Life Member[/blue][/url] [url=www.saf.org][red]SAF[/red][/url] [url=www.saf.org][blue]Supporter[/blue][/url] [url=sas-aim.org][red]SAS[/red][/url] [url=sas-aim.org][blue]Supporter[/blue][/b][/url]
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Oh please get real.
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 2:03:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/11/2003 2:04:43 PM EDT by Max_Mike]
Not that you probably care, but it's a Federal crime to copy a copy-protected DVD. It's not that having a copy is illegal, but the process of breaking the copy-protection that's illegal. You probably have as much chance of being busted by the Fed for having "evil features" on you post-ban AR as you have for being busted for breaking DVD copy-protection. Almost 0%.
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Sorry but wrong… the courts have ruled over and over you have the right to fair use; you can make copies for you own use. The DVD copies DVD-X-Copy make cannot be copied by DVD-X-copy... this is a feature of the product. DVD-X-Copy is being legally sold and while the movie companies have made noises about suing them they have not done it. There is nothing illegal about owning DVD-X-Copy or using it for personal use.
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 2:04:39 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 2:42:12 PM EDT
Legalities aside, the major problem with copying DVDs is that commercial video DVDs use a double-layer format that DVD burners cannot burn. (this is not a copy protection thing, it's a limitation of the laser/dye burning process - commercial DVDs are pressed, not burned). There are several software products that will copy DVDs onto one or more CDs or DVDs. In most cases you will lose image quality as the video must be re-compressed to fit in a smaller space. However, you might not notice the difference if you don't have a high-end A/V system.
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 2:51:14 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/11/2003 2:51:38 PM EDT by Kar98]
Copy protection? How cute :) Check [url]http://www.dvdr-digest.com/articles/articles.php?article_id=23&page=2[/url]. for your needs.
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 3:34:53 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/11/2003 3:37:53 PM EDT by ProfGAB101]
Of course it [i]can[/i] be done, but is it worth it? There are options to make the DVD fit, and other methods as well. But consider how much time it will take, how much your time is worth, the cost of recordable media, etc. Visit [url=http://www.doom9.org/]Doom9[/url] for more answers (in the Guides section) - be prepared to read several layers to get the full picture, but if you want it, its all there - FREE. Edit to activate link.
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 3:55:07 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/11/2003 3:56:47 PM EDT by crowTrobotwork]
Are some of you guys in the ice age? My neighbor strips the flash and copies the movie. I have a copy of Dune on one disk. Kim Kommado talked about xcopy on her last show and said she wouldn't buy it cause it takes 2 disk. One thing I'm not sure of. Copied dvd movies may only work on pc type hardware and not your normal dvd player.
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 4:22:51 PM EDT
Originally Posted By cyanide: Oh please get real.
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I am real. I'm refereing to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. [url]http://www.loc.gov/copyright/legislation/dmca.pdf[/url] BTW, I'm not saying you shouldn't do it. Just pointing out something. I've been pirating software since the early '80s and that's technically a big no no too. I also download music off the internet. (GASP!) Jesus, relax! [img]photos.ar15.com/ImageGallery/IG_LoadImage.asp?iImageUnq=476[/img] [url=www.nra.org][b][red]NRA[/red][/url] [url=www.nra.org][blue]Life Member[/blue][/url] [url=www.gunowners.org][b][red]GOA[/red] [/url] [url=www.gunowners.org][blue]Life Member[/blue][/url] [url=www.saf.org][red]SAF[/red][/url] [url=www.saf.org][blue]Supporter[/blue][/url] [url=sas-aim.org][red]SAS[/red][/url] [url=sas-aim.org][blue]Supporter[/blue][/b][/url]
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 4:37:13 PM EDT
Long time lurker.....My first post. DVD X Copy does a great job backing up DVD's. It's only drawback is that it usually takes 2 disks to do it (menus, special features, etc...). DVD X Copy Express on the other hand will just copy the movie and 1 audio track and put it on one disk. The quality of the copies are pretty good, I can barely tell the difference.
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 4:38:41 PM EDT
copying anything dvd-related is possible. It really depends on the disc. If it is a single layer disc, it is as simple as straight ripping and burning. If it is a double layered disc, then it is a much longer process, as it will need to be re-authored. I have yet to find a DVD that I cant copy...
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 4:40:22 PM EDT
Originally Posted By crowTrobotwork: One thing I'm not sure of. Copied dvd movies may only work on pc type hardware and not your normal dvd player.
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about 2 years ago, i read an article that said a lot of the companies (philips-magnavox, sony, etc...) that make the dvd burners have agreed to use the same format in order for the copied dvd's to work in most (if not all) dvd players.
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 4:55:00 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 9:06:37 PM EDT
I use X-Copy for the 40% or so that will fit on one disc. For the others you will need to rip them to your hardrive and then use Pinnacle Instant DVD. It will compress them and put all of it on one DVD but also give you the option of de-selecting the junk on a DVD that is unimportant to you and thus lessoning the amount of compression. As long as the compression is not more than 30% you cannot see a any difference in the quality. And that's keeping the 5.1 surround sound. I can copy almost anything except Disney stuff. If you buy DVDR's on ebay in quantities of 100 you can get the price down to 90 cents for so for each disc. Add 20 cents for a lable and you got DVD quality for about a buck. X-Copy only take an hour or two but if you have to rip the movie and then compress it can take four hours or more. It's not like you have to sit and watch it or anything. The software is easy to use. Few more things. Stay away form Sony burners, buy a pioneer, others may work but you will have less trouble with media compatibility. Go with DVD-R format, I think that's the dirction things are going. Don't waste money on 2x or 4x media, what does it matter how long it takes to burn. Like I said before, you don't have to watch it or anything. And last but not least, join Netflix.
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 9:21:39 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Max_Mike:
Not that you probably care, but it's a Federal crime to copy a copy-protected DVD. It's not that having a copy is illegal, but the process of breaking the copy-protection that's illegal. You probably have as much chance of being busted by the Fed for having "evil features" on you post-ban AR as you have for being busted for breaking DVD copy-protection. Almost 0%.
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Sorry but wrong… the courts have ruled over and over you have the right to fair use; you can make copies for you own use. The DVD copies DVD-X-Copy make cannot be copied by DVD-X-copy... this is a feature of the product. DVD-X-Copy is being legally sold and while the movie companies have made noises about suing them they have not done it. There is nothing illegal about owning DVD-X-Copy or using it for personal use.
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DVDX copy is legal becouse it doesnt rip the dvd it streams it then burns the stream VS cracking the encryttion ripping it then burning
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 10:25:36 PM EDT
Never underestimate the RIAA's ability to screw you. They have the best attack-dog lawyers in the nation and they have no mercy. Just a thought.
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 10:27:00 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Yankee1911: Copy protection? Give the cybergeeks some time and that will be as useless as tits on a boar. That's nothing but a challenge to those guys, and they will find a way around it. Count on it.
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a 15 year old foreign kid coded the software which allows you to copy dvd's
Link Posted: 5/12/2003 11:44:02 AM EDT
What's so bad about the Sony burners? I have the DRU500A and it works fine with me. I've also heard the the Pioneer's are great (A05/105 -R Burners). I think that Sony may have rushed the burner to market, but with the correct firmware it works like a charm.
Link Posted: 5/12/2003 12:16:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/12/2003 12:17:42 PM EDT by skipperJ]
Go with the + techology and Sony players and burners will work just fine. DVD+R/RW is the most compatible format. Read all about it here: [url]http://www.dvdrw.com/[/url] DVDXCopy will burn your rented movies on two disks with excellent quality The new DVDXCopyExpress burns movies on one disk and I can't tell the difference in the quality which is as good as the master copy. I highly recommend this software. I've been using it since it last November and now that the bugs are out of it it works perfectly and is extremely easy to use. It is completely legal. Go back and read the post by Max_Mike at 5/11/2003 6:03:36 PM
Link Posted: 5/12/2003 3:35:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/12/2003 3:38:43 PM EDT by magnum_99]
It's easy. Search the web for a program called "smart ripper." Smart ripper uses the infamous De-Css code (which BTW is illegal, under the DMCA to distribute). You need this to "unlock" the copy protection and extract the .vob files from the DVD. Then, you can pull of the .vob files and save them to your hard disk. Most films take up anywhere from 4-6 gigabytes--so you need a large hard drive. Once you have the .vob files, you can use any DVD burning software to burn the files to DVD-ROM. The files will be De-Macrovisioned, De-region coded, and should work on most commercial DVD players if the proper media and format is selected. You are technically permitted one backup copy of titles that you own, BUT, there seems to be a grey area re the use of De-CSS to do this. Who the hell will know anyway? Just don't start a commercial operation. Edited to say: This in no way constitutes legal advice. I don't recommend doing this. IT MAY BE ILLEGAL. Don't blame me if you go to jail. And, I'm not telling a big secret here. You can search the web and find these "informational" only instructions on many place on the web, including here.
Link Posted: 5/12/2003 4:11:40 PM EDT
I have been using Pinnacle Instant Copy v7 for making backup copies of my DVDs. It works great and was $20.00 It will burn a 1:1 copy of your DVD(keeps menus and compesses video) onto a 4.7g DVD-/+R. You can decrease the quality or get rid of special features you never watch and then increase the quality of the main movie. It is very easy to use (It does take a while but I do it before a go to bed). The copies I've made play perfect in my home DVD player and the quality is great! check out [url]www.dvdrhelp.com[/url]
Link Posted: 5/12/2003 4:18:13 PM EDT
Careful what you download. That DeCSS code in ANY format can get you busted under DMCRA...the legality is arcane...if you have a DVD reader (NOT burner) and are running Linux, the case against you is weak at best if all you are doing is running DVD's through your Open Source OS. But, if you have a DVD reader, a DVD burner and a 320 GB Ultra SCSI 320 drive and host adapter hooked up to your PIII with 512 MB of memory running Windoze XP, the US Atty isn't going to cut you any slack.
Link Posted: 5/12/2003 4:47:12 PM EDT
Originally Posted By cyanide:
Originally Posted By USPC40: Not that you probably care, but it's a Federal crime to copy a copy-protected DVD. It's not that having a copy is illegal, but the process of breaking the copy-protection that's illegal. You probably have as much chance of being busted by the Fed for having "evil features" on you post-ban AR as you have for being busted for breaking DVD copy-protection. Almost 0%. Good luck! [url]photos.ar15.com/ImageGallery/IG_LoadImage.asp?iImageUnq=476[/url] [url=www.nra.org][b][red]NRA[/red][/url] [url=www.nra.org][blue]Life Member[/blue][/url] [url=www.gunowners.org][b][red]GOA[/red] [/url] [url=www.gunowners.org][blue]Life Member[/blue][/url] [url=www.saf.org][red]SAF[/red][/url] [url=www.saf.org][blue]Supporter[/blue][/url] [url=sas-aim.org][red]SAS[/red][/url] [url=sas-aim.org][blue]Supporter[/blue][/b][/url]
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Oh please get real.
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Yup, get real [rolleyes]
Sony Corp. v. Universal City Studios, Inc., 464 U.S. 417 (1984), which proclaimed the legality of home video copying for "time-shifting" purposes (taping a broadcast program to watch at a later time, then erasing the copy so as not to build a "library" of copyrighted works).
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THE NO ELECTRONIC THEFT ACT The NET, enacted in December 1997, attempted to crack down on computer-based piracy by instituting criminal penalties for copyright infringement by electronic means under 18 U.S.C. § 2319. A trader in illegal MP3s could get up to 6 years in prison (for a second offense -- up to 3 years for a first) and/or a hefty fine for distributing as little as $1000 worth of music. [red]The law also amended the Copyright Act's definition of "financial gain" (17 U.S.C. § 101) stringently to include "receipt, or expectation of receipt, of anything of value, including the receipt of other copyrighted works."[/red] This places under the Act's ambit the MP3 "ratio sites" which require a user to upload a file before they may download one, as well as trading areas like this one, should the trading be in unauthorized copies.
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One of many sources for this type of info: [url]http://eon.law.harvard.edu/mp3/[/url] Yes, he's being real. It's illegal, yet highly unlikely one will be caught or prosecuted.
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