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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/11/2005 8:26:20 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/11/2005 8:35:26 PM EDT by Fly-Navy]
So here is a somewhat strange request.

Since I was NROTC in college, I couldn't keep my books after the semesters (terms at my school) were over. I can't remember most of the books we used, nor if they were any good. What I'm looking for are good Calculus, Physics, and Chemistry text books to keep in a "professional library". I was an EE major, and I have my two best friends from that area of study. They would be:

"Signal Processing and Linear Systems" by B. P. Lathi

"Microelectronic Circuits" by Adel Sedra and Kenneth Smith

So, if anyone can help me out, that would be much appreciated. For Physics, a book(s) on Mechanics, E&M, and Optics would be great, as well as one on Modern Physics.

Thanks!
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 8:33:54 PM EDT
Right now, my physics course is using:

University Physics 11th edition, Volumes 1&2 by Hugh Young and Roger Freedman

Volume 1 covers all of mechanics and more, while volume 2 covers electricity, optics, and modern physics.

Overall, I'd say its pretty meh. Nothing to special or unique about it. Most of the book is forumlas, examples, and practice problems with some conceptual stuff mixed in. Organization could be better, but overall its ok.
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 9:10:46 PM EDT
The best calculus book in the world is Michael Spivak's. No shit.
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 9:21:20 PM EDT
Halliday, Resnick and Walker's "Fundamentals of Physics" is a great non-calculus overview of physics. It will cover the vast majority of concepts that you might need brushing-up on (including modern physics). It all depends on what you are doing. That book might be fine, or you might need Jackson for E&M, Goldstein for mechanics, etc.
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 9:56:17 PM EDT
And you need a CRC Handbook of Chemistry & Physics, CRC = Chemical Rubber Company.

Also, CRC Standard Mathematical Tables and Formulae.

If you don't know about these books, get them anyway. Any engineer should have them.
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 10:54:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fizassist:
Halliday, Resnick and Walker's "Fundamentals of Physics" is a great non-calculus overview of physics. It will cover the vast majority of concepts that you might need brushing-up on (including modern physics). It all depends on what you are doing. That book might be fine, or you might need Jackson for E&M, Goldstein for mechanics, etc.




My undergrad calc physics book for University Physics 1 and 2 was Physics for Scientists and Engineers by Serway. It's still published, now under Serway and Beichner, and is still a good text. I can recommend it.

Two calc books that I have that I really like are Calculus by Swokowski, Olinick and Pence, and also the book (and series) by Dick and Patton.

Jim

p.s.--Don't discount the value of a Schaum's Outline in whatever area(s) you want to review and keep up with. Start with the Handbook of Formulas and Tables, and go from there.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 12:13:54 AM EDT
Kleppner & Kolenkow for Mechanics, Purcell for E&M. They are more hardcore than the others people have listed :).

For calc I guess the standard Thomas and Finney - text is so-so but at least it's got lots of pretty pictures :). Or Hubbard if you are more of a masochist :)
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 4:35:05 AM EDT

Originally Posted By KS_Physicist:
p.s.--Don't discount the value of a Schaum's Outline in whatever area(s) you want to review and keep up with. Start with the Handbook of Formulas and Tables, and go from there.



Good point; I've picked up a number of these along the way, and they're a good value.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 5:31:28 AM EDT
the BEST physics book is the one i lit on fire...
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 5:46:02 AM EDT
Have those texts in my library ... "The Feynman Lectures on Physics", which is a 3-volume softcover set and Engineering Electromagnetics by Hayt are also nice to have.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 12:14:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Engineer:
Have those texts in my library ... "The Feynman Lectures on Physics", which is a 3-volume softcover set.



Also a great addition to the library! He does a beautiful job of explaining basic (& more advanced) concepts without drowning you in math.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 12:26:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/12/2005 12:27:30 PM EDT by ColonelKlink]
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 12:35:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By A_Free_Man:
And you need a CRC Handbook of Chemistry & Physics, CRC = Chemical Rubber Company.

Also, CRC Standard Mathematical Tables and Formulae.

If you don't know about these books, get them anyway. Any engineer should have them.



+1 on the CRC. I have one and use it from time to time. It's a huge book!
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 2:22:09 PM EDT
Thanks guys, keep them coming.

I should mention that I am (was?) versed in calculus based physics, so that's where I tend to steer.

I'm not an engineer by trade, just by college degree. But, nonetheless, I'd like the library, because I always finding myself having to answer someone's question on the relevant topics.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 2:33:29 PM EDT
Calculus?? I got your Calculus right here. Actually, I have a whole stack of ME books. I'll trade em to you for your degree.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 2:37:18 PM EDT
The physics and chem books you may not ever look at again, maybe a few times in 20 years.
The CRC handbooks, depending on your job, you may use them daily, or somewhat less often, but you will use them (or should) more than the actual textbooks.

For example, all those equations you derived in Calculus (or more properly, "Analytical Geometry with The Calculus"), the stuff you did in Chemistry, Physics, you can simply look them up in the CRC. You need to know the arctangent of 4 degrees, 21 minutes, 10 seconds? You can probably get a program to do this, or simply look it up in the CRC.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:14:09 PM EDT
Good Freshman/Sophomore Physics Text is Physics by Serway
Good book on Modern Physics is "Quantum Physics of Atoms, Molecules, Solids, Nuclei, and Particles by Eisburg and Resneck.
Good Upper Division Book on Classical Mechanics is Classical Dynamics of Particles & Systems by Marion
Good Grad Book on Classical Mechanics is by Goldstein.

Good Undergrad Book on E&M is Introduction to Electrodynamics by Griffiths.
Good Grad Book on E&M is Classical Electrodynamics by Jackson

Good Book on Quantum Mechanics is the two volume set by Cohen & Tannoudi
Good Grad Book on Nonrelativistics Quantum Mechanics is by J.J. Sakurai

Entire set of books by Landau and Levshitz on Physics is Good
And of course the The Feynman Lectures.

Good Book on Optics is by Hecht and Zajac

The Definitive Book on Optics (Grad Level) is by Born and Wolf.

Good Calculus Book: (take your pick) though Richard Courant's Calculus two volume set is a Classic
Good Lower Division O.D.E. Book is by Boyce and Diprima

Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:18:23 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Bostonterrier97:
Good Lower Division O.D.E. Book is by Boyce and Diprima




That's the one we used in my DE class in college.



Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:22:24 PM EDT
PM sent
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 6:48:39 PM EDT
+1 for Stewart's Calculus. Buy them on eBay for cheap!
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 11:19:40 PM EDT
Serway and Halliday and Resnick are good Physics Books.
Link Posted: 9/12/2005 11:22:03 PM EDT
best place for used textbooks

www.half.com

Can usually find stuff for a fraction of what the bookstores want

EPOCH
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