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Posted: 4/19/2016 4:58:13 PM EDT
Well shit.  Regulations can't force people to use common sense, like not intentionally jamming the controls with an improvisation easily overlooked in pre-flight:

CNN
The crash of a huge C-130J cargo plane that killed 14 people in Afghanistan in October is being blamed on the misuse of a night-vision goggles case, according to a U.S. Air Force investigation report.

The flight crashed 28 seconds after takeoff from Jalalabad Airport near the Afghan-Pakistani border on October 2 as it was heading to Bagram Airfield.

Initially, the Taliban said Islamist fighters had downed the four-engine plane, but U.S. military officials immediately shed doubt on those claims.

The dead included the pilot, co-pilot, two loadmasters, two security team members and five contractors as passengers. Three Afghan guards on the ground were also killed when the plane hit a guard tower, said the report, which was released Friday.

While the plane was on the ground loading and offloading cargo, the pilot placed the goggles case in front of the cockpit yoke, which is used to steer the plane during flight. The pilot put the case there to prop up part of the plane's tail -- the elevators -- to help the loading team deal with some tall cargo. The goggles case was never removed from the cockpit yoke. During the first seconds of takeoff, the plane's nose started to pitch up too far, so the pilot tried to adjust by moving the yoke forward. But the goggles case blocked the yoke.

Read the U.S. Air Force crash investigation report (PDF): Link

The pilot "misidentified the ensuing flight control problem," the report said, "resulting in improper recovery techniques" by both the pilot and the co-pilot. The plane's nose pitched upward too fast, leading to a stall and a crash, the report said. The aircraft exploded upon impact, it said, and everyone on board died instantly.

"The blocking of the flight controls during loading operations is a non-standard procedure," the report said, "as such, there is no regulatory guidance to prohibit the act, or to address the proper placement and removal of the object blocking the controls."

The report said it was the responsibility of the pilot and co-pilot to remember to remove the goggles case, even though it wasn't on their checklist before takeoff.

The Air Force said the C-130J Hercules cost $48.5 million per aircraft.

The Pentagon identified the airmen killed in the crash as Capt. Jonathan J. Golden, 33, of Camarillo, California; Capt. Jordan B. Pierson, 28, of Abilene, Texas; Staff Sgt. Ryan D. Hammond, 26, of Moundsville, West Virginia; Senior Airman Quinn L. Johnson-Harris, 21, of Milwaukee; Senior Airman Nathan C. Sartain, 29, of Pensacola, Florida; and Airman 1st Class Kcey E. Ruiz, 21, of McDonough, Georgia.

Golden, Pierson, Hammond and Johnson-Harris were assigned to the 39th Airlift Squadron, Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. Sartain and Ruiz were assigned to the 66th Security Forces Squadron, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts.
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Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:00:47 PM EDT
So how did they miss the position of the tail on their preflight walk around....

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:01:52 PM EDT
I was going to say, that should have been caught, right?
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:01:53 PM EDT
That sucks.  Could have easily been avoided.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:05:56 PM EDT
Damn that's awful.

I thought it was SOP to move the yoke and pedals before flight to check for free movement.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:07:24 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/19/2016 5:09:56 PM EDT by BillofRights]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Orion_Shall_Rise:
So how did they miss the position of the tail on their preflight walk around....

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
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How did they miss something in front of the yoke during taxi and takeoff?       I'm guessing they were wearing NVG's.       ..Still, no excuse.  


It took an extraordinary amount of complacency on the part of both pilots, also fatigue probably played a part.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:08:17 PM EDT
"The blocking of the flight controls during loading operations is a non-standard procedure," the report said, "as such, there is no regulatory guidance to prohibit the act, or to address the proper placement and removal of the object blocking the controls."

I'm with you OP, do they really need regulatory guidance to tell them to not block their damn flight controls???  Darwin award to the pilot.  Too bad he took others with him.


P.S.  In the fighter world part of the launch sequence is to go "around the horn" with the stick making sure it has full travel in all directions and ensuring the control surfaces respond correctly.  Guess that isn't done in the cargo world.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:08:27 PM EDT
Read the report.



ERO = Engine Running Onload/ Offload.



They never shutdown the engines while the cargo was being loaded.



Yes, this could have been prevented.



Yes, something this small can be missed by a crew.





Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:09:16 PM EDT
Damn.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:11:27 PM EDT
Damn
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:12:56 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AL-BOB:
"The blocking of the flight controls during loading operations is a non-standard procedure," the report said, "as such, there is no regulatory guidance to prohibit the act, or to address the proper placement and removal of the object blocking the controls."

I'm with you OP, do they really need regulatory guidance to tell them to not block their damn flight controls???  Darwin award to the pilot.  Too bad he took others with him.


P.S.  In the fighter world part of the launch sequence is to go "around the horn" with the stick making sure it has full travel in all directions and ensuring the control surfaces respond correctly.  Guess that isn't done in the cargo world.
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On the 135 the flight control check is done pretty early in the check and wouldn't be generally repeated for a turn where the crew didn't get off the jet.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:13:13 PM EDT
Man. That's just...awful.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:16:00 PM EDT
I've done it.  Need to prop the elevators up to clear a high mast on a forklift. Wedge something in front of the yolk so the loadmasters can get the equipment up to the ramp. We usually use a pelican case for one of our laptops or a cargo strap around the yolk to the seat.  

Before takeoff checklists has a flight controls check. Not sure about air force though.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:16:12 PM EDT
How do they know if all died? Was the case still wedged there?
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:17:35 PM EDT
What Is a jury rig?
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:18:42 PM EDT
Slight thread drift...didn't we lose an AC-130 years ago when one of the gunners dropped a flare down the barrel of either the howitzer or bofors cannon, the flare got stuck, and he tried to dislodge it by firing another round behind it?

Is this C-130J a new production model?

Or is it like a 1950's or 1960's model that got new engines and curved props?

I am surprised by the $48.5 million price tag.

Years ago, MAC would put a little magazine called the MAC flyer.  I remember ine article was titled "Complacency Kills".
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:19:03 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Orion_Shall_Rise:
So how did they miss the position of the tail on their preflight walk around....

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
View Quote



how about the whole controls free and clear check?

pull back on the yoke, push forward on the yoke - watch the ailerons as you turn the yoke?

That basic flight pre-check?
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:19:24 PM EDT
On every airplane I've ever flown, "Flight Controls-Free and Correct".  Was part of the pre takeoff check.   It's a standard thing.  You do it, even on planes where you might be using a memory checklist rather than the standard Challenge and Response format.  

If you think about it, it's one of only a handful of items that really matter.    Fuel, Flaps, Flight Controls, Power, Instruments (if you are feeling particularily detail oriented).    

That's only 5 fucking things to remember,

but they will kill you if you forget them.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:20:03 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By WeimaranerDad:


Slight thread drift...didn't we lose an AC-130 years ago when one of the gunners dropped a flare down the barrel of either the howitzer or bofors cannon, the flare got stuck, and he tried to dislodge it by firing another round behind it?



Is this C-130J a new production model?



Or is it like a 1950's or 1960's model that got new engines and curved props?




I am surprised by the $48.5 million price tag.



Years ago, MAC would put a little magazine called the MAC flyer.  I remember ine article was titled "Complacency Kills".
View Quote


Last new production model.  Less crew, more computers, higher performance.



 
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:22:54 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:24:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/19/2016 5:29:26 PM EDT by lostnswv]
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Originally Posted By skytrooper01:
What Is a jury rig?
View Quote


Use something not necessarily designed for a particular use. Similar to using duck tape to affix a sling to a rifle, use JB weld to plug a hole in a gas tank,  using cork to plug a hole in a radiator, use paracord secure a tent. Lots of terms one involving a racial sub group and the term engineering or slander and the term rig. In the .mil world the term is probably something like field expedited repair. Basically a cobble job that is not meant to be a permanent fix. In this case it like using a cinder block to prop open a door that keep getting in the way.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:24:24 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/19/2016 5:24:48 PM EDT by Mal_means_bad]
Remember the experimental Caribou that crashed on take off some years back because the gust locks were still engaged: close ground video of stall and crash
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:26:35 PM EDT


Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By skytrooper01:



What Is a jury rig?
View Quote





 





Jury rigging refers to makeshift repairs or temporary contrivances, made with only the tools and materials that happen to be on hand, originally a nautical term. On sailing ships, a jury rig is a replacement mast and yards (which hold the ship's rigging) improvised in case of damage or loss of the original mast.[url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jury_rig#cite_note-alt.usage.english-1][1][/url]


 
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:27:45 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By skytrooper01:
What Is a jury rig?
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Like zip tying your bumper to your car. It's a half ass fix.

I never had issues with loading tall cargo on a 130 that required the pilot to mess with the elevators. We always had spotters to watch out for stuff like that, even during EROs. If the load/pilot had to fuck with their flight controls in order to make it fit, it shouldn't have gone on the plane in the first place. Sad shit.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:32:13 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By skytrooper01:
What Is a jury rig?
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Paying off members to rule in your client's favor.  Trust me, I saw it on t.v.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:00:29 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By xviperx420:
Like zip tying your bumper to your car. It's a half ass fix.



I never had issues with loading tall cargo on a 130 that required the pilot to mess with the elevators. We always had spotters to watch out for stuff like that, even during EROs. If the load/pilot had to fuck with their flight controls in order to make it fit, it shouldn't have gone on the plane in the first place. Sad shit.
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Originally Posted By xviperx420:



Originally Posted By skytrooper01:

What Is a jury rig?




Like zip tying your bumper to your car. It's a half ass fix.



I never had issues with loading tall cargo on a 130 that required the pilot to mess with the elevators. We always had spotters to watch out for stuff like that, even during EROs. If the load/pilot had to fuck with their flight controls in order to make it fit, it shouldn't have gone on the plane in the first place. Sad shit.


I'll have to disagree, because I've seen it multiple times over the
space of 16 years on Hercs.  The inner edges of the elevators absolutely
can be problematic when loading out-sized cargo under certain conditions.  Yes, we used spotters.



 
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:09:55 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By skytrooper01:
What Is a jury rig?
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Probably similar to n*&&^r rig, but I don't know.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:11:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/19/2016 6:11:25 PM EDT by Smash47]
I'm not gonna criticize other than to say the guy who fucked up paid with his life and we lost a lot of good people. We've all made bad bad choices but in avionics bad choices even something that seems minor can end in quick death. Thoughts and prayers to all involved...

 
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:14:49 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/19/2016 6:16:51 PM EDT by xviperx420]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JAFFE:

I'll have to disagree, because I've seen it multiple times over the space of 16 years on Hercs.  The inner edges of the elevators absolutely can be problematic when loading out-sized cargo under certain conditions.  Yes, we used spotters.
 
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Originally Posted By JAFFE:
Originally Posted By xviperx420:
Originally Posted By skytrooper01:
What Is a jury rig?


Like zip tying your bumper to your car. It's a half ass fix.

I never had issues with loading tall cargo on a 130 that required the pilot to mess with the elevators. We always had spotters to watch out for stuff like that, even during EROs. If the load/pilot had to fuck with their flight controls in order to make it fit, it shouldn't have gone on the plane in the first place. Sad shit.

I'll have to disagree, because I've seen it multiple times over the space of 16 years on Hercs.  The inner edges of the elevators absolutely can be problematic when loading out-sized cargo under certain conditions.  Yes, we used spotters.
 


I always was leery of loading shit like ISU-90s and other stuff that was near max height because of that reason. We were super cautious about it, and if it looked like it was going to hit without moving the elevators, we bumped it and loaded it on a larger bird just to be safe. I once asked a load if they COULD raise them, and I got told if it didn't fit without raising them, they wouldn't take it. Didn't question it after that.

I also hated driving 10K ATs because of how close the cab was to the jet... rather load a pallet with a 60K.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:16:44 PM EDT
The accident report in the link makes for scary reading.

Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:18:53 PM EDT
Damn I flew over the site after this happened and saw the wreckage...damn
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:22:23 PM EDT


Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By xviperx420:
I always was leery of loading shit like ISU-90s and other stuff that was near max height because of that reason. We were super cautious about it, and if it looked like it was going to hit without moving the elevators, we bumped it and loaded it on a larger bird just to be safe. I once asked a load if they COULD raise them, and I got told if it didn't fit without raising them, they wouldn't take it. Didn't question it after that.
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Originally Posted By xviperx420:





Originally Posted By JAFFE:




Originally Posted By xviperx420:




Originally Posted By skytrooper01:


What Is a jury rig?






Like zip tying your bumper to your car. It's a half ass fix.





I never had issues with loading tall cargo on a 130 that required the pilot to mess with the elevators. We always had spotters to watch out for stuff like that, even during EROs. If the load/pilot had to fuck with their flight controls in order to make it fit, it shouldn't have gone on the plane in the first place. Sad shit.



I'll have to disagree, because I've seen it multiple times over the space of 16 years on Hercs.  The inner edges of the elevators absolutely can be problematic when loading out-sized cargo under certain conditions.  Yes, we used spotters.


 






I always was leery of loading shit like ISU-90s and other stuff that was near max height because of that reason. We were super cautious about it, and if it looked like it was going to hit without moving the elevators, we bumped it and loaded it on a larger bird just to be safe. I once asked a load if they COULD raise them, and I got told if it didn't fit without raising them, they wouldn't take it. Didn't question it after that.



I'm a dinosaur, and have been told repeatedly that I served in a different AF.





It wasn't normal, but it occurred on occasion.  And back then, if we could safely get cargo on board and complete the mission, it went.





Crashes suck, regardless of reasons.





I just hope the lessons learned from this one prevent another occurrence.








 
 
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:30:24 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By JAFFE:

I'm a dinosaur, and have been told repeatedly that I served in a different AF.

It wasn't normal, but it occurred on occasion.  And back then, if we could safely get cargo on board and complete the mission, it went.

Crashes suck, regardless of reasons.

I just hope the lessons learned from this one prevent another occurrence.


   
View Quote


We both did, and I only got out 2 years ago. Shit changed FAST. Used to operate under the same conditions. If we could make it fit without damaging the plane or cause it to be out of balance, it went. Now, if it just looks like it'll fuck something up, it gets bumped until it gets corrected to where the load is happy or the plane leaves.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:32:13 PM EDT
Reminds me of the Caribou crash when control elevator was in the locked position on take-off.




Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:32:28 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Bubbatheredneck:

 

Jury rigging refers to makeshift repairs or temporary contrivances, made with only the tools and materials that happen to be on hand, originally a nautical term. On sailing ships, a jury rig is a replacement mast and yards (which hold the ship's rigging) improvised in case of damage or loss of the original mast.[url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jury_rig#cite_note-alt.usage.english-1][1][/url]
 
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Originally Posted By Bubbatheredneck:
Originally Posted By skytrooper01:
What Is a jury rig?

 

Jury rigging refers to makeshift repairs or temporary contrivances, made with only the tools and materials that happen to be on hand, originally a nautical term. On sailing ships, a jury rig is a replacement mast and yards (which hold the ship's rigging) improvised in case of damage or loss of the original mast.[url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jury_rig#cite_note-alt.usage.english-1][1][/url]
 



Also known as Afro Engineering.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:34:31 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By larkinmusic:
Damn that's awful.

I thought it was SOP to move the yoke and pedals before flight to check for free movement.
View Quote



Line up checks...yup.


This isn't passing the stink test.

Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:35:28 PM EDT
Damn, that sucks.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:39:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/19/2016 6:54:54 PM EDT by KR35RR]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SmilingBandit:

On the 135 the flight control check is done pretty early in the check and wouldn't be generally repeated for a turn where the crew didn't get off the jet.
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Originally Posted By SmilingBandit:
Originally Posted By AL-BOB:
"The blocking of the flight controls during loading operations is a non-standard procedure," the report said, "as such, there is no regulatory guidance to prohibit the act, or to address the proper placement and removal of the object blocking the controls."

I'm with you OP, do they really need regulatory guidance to tell them to not block their damn flight controls???  Darwin award to the pilot.  Too bad he took others with him.


P.S.  In the fighter world part of the launch sequence is to go "around the horn" with the stick making sure it has full travel in all directions and ensuring the control surfaces respond correctly.  Guess that isn't done in the cargo world.

On the 135 the flight control check is done pretty early in the check and wouldn't be generally repeated for a turn where the crew didn't get off the jet.


That checks, not sure about a 130 thru-flight though. If it was an ERO I think they just pull the ramp up and blast off.

ETA: Reading is fundamental.

Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:41:57 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Chris_C:



Line up checks...yup.


This isn't passing the stink test.

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Originally Posted By Chris_C:
Originally Posted By larkinmusic:
Damn that's awful.

I thought it was SOP to move the yoke and pedals before flight to check for free movement.



Line up checks...yup.


This isn't passing the stink test.




It happens. Whether it's fatigue, complacency or any number of external factors, it happens in both civil and military aviation.

Here's a longish article about the G-4 crash in Bedford MA caused by the gust lock being engaged.

Click here
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:42:47 PM EDT
It's not the first time, and sounds like pretty much the same situation to me. I remember when this one happened.

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19861004-0
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:43:47 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Frank_The_Tank:
Probably similar to n*&&^r rig, but I don't know.
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Originally Posted By Frank_The_Tank:



Originally Posted By skytrooper01:

What Is a jury rig?






Probably similar to n*&&^r rig, but I don't know.
I have heard it has been corrected, and it is now called "African American Engineering". Just for the sake of the PC crowd.



 
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:48:57 PM EDT


 
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:51:01 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Valkyrie:
I've done it.  Need to prop the elevators up to clear a high mast on a forklift. Wedge something in front of the yolk so the loadmasters can get the equipment up to the ramp. We usually use a pelican case for one of our laptops or a cargo strap around the yolk to the seat.  

Before takeoff checklists has a flight controls check. Not sure about air force though.
View Quote


Hope it doesn't slip while someone is under the elevator.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:52:47 PM EDT
i'm calling BS.  The elevator does not hang down low enough to interfere with loading anything that will fit.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:52:53 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BillofRights:
On every airplane I've ever flown, "Flight Controls-Free and Correct".  Was part of the pre takeoff check.   It's a standard thing.  You do it, even on planes where you might be using a memory checklist rather than the standard Challenge and Response format.  

If you think about it, it's one of only a handful of items that really matter.    Fuel, Flaps, Flight Controls, Power, Instruments (if you are feeling particularily detail oriented).    

That's only 5 fucking things to remember,

but they will kill you if you forget them.
View Quote


My checklist : CIGAR

Controls
Instruments
Gas
Aircraft
Run up.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:54:49 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By kfs35:



It happens. Whether it's fatigue, complacency or any number of external factors, it happens in both civil and military aviation.

Here's a longish article about the G-4 crash in Bedford MA caused by the gust lock being engaged.

Click here
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Originally Posted By kfs35:
Originally Posted By Chris_C:
Originally Posted By larkinmusic:
Damn that's awful.

I thought it was SOP to move the yoke and pedals before flight to check for free movement.



Line up checks...yup.


This isn't passing the stink test.




It happens. Whether it's fatigue, complacency or any number of external factors, it happens in both civil and military aviation.

Here's a longish article about the G-4 crash in Bedford MA caused by the gust lock being engaged.

Click here


Wow....just, wow


CVR data and pilot interviews revealed that checklists simply were not used. This was not an anomaly, it was standard operating procedure for them.


Flight control checks were not performed on this flight, nor were they ever performed. Hundreds of flights worth of data from the FDR and pilot interviews confirm it.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:56:25 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By maggiethecat:
i'm calling BS.  The elevator does not hang down low enough to interfere with loading anything that will fit.
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How many 130 hours do you have? Are you a 2T2?
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:56:37 PM EDT
Damn that sucks. Hate it for all involved.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:57:49 PM EDT
Tragic, but not shocking.



The RAF almost lost one of their brand-spanking-new A330 tankers (Airbus KC2 Voyager, Ser. No. ZZ333) due to digital camera becoming wedged between the pilot's seat arm rest and the side-stick controller.




See:

http://news.aviation-safety.net/2015/03/23/report-wedged-camera-at-sidestick-causes-airbus-a330-loss-of-altitude-incident-2/





"On February 9, 2014 an RAF Airbus A330, modified as a Multi Role Tanker Transport (MRTT), departed RAF Brize Norton on a transport flight to Camp Bastion Air Base in Afghanistan. On board were 189 passengers and nine crew members.




"With the aircraft in the cruise at FL330 over Turkey and auto-pilot 1 engaged, the co-pilot had left his seat and was in the forward galley in the vicinity of the forward left passenger door. The captain reported that he suddenly felt a sensation of weightlessness and being restrained by his harness, accompanied by a rapid pitching down of the aircraft. He attempted to take control by pulling back on his side-stick controller and pressing the auto-pilot disconnect button but these actions were ineffective.

...




"The captain took control, setting Take-off and Go-around power and subsequently re-establishing a power attitude combination for straight and level flight at FL310. The aircraft had lost 4,400 feet in 27 seconds, registering a maximum rate-of-descent of approximately 15,800 feet per minute. The g-forces during the event ranged from -0,58g to +2.06g during the recovery. This negative g-forces were sufficient for a significant number of passengers and crew to be thrown towards the cabin roof. Twenty-five passengers and seven crew members were injured. Inside the cabin there was damage to some ceiling panels and seat elements.

...




"The Flight Data Recorder and Cockpit Voice Recorder information showed that the captain’s side-stick moved at one minute and 44 seconds prior to the event (introducing a sustained, small pitch-down command of 0.8 degrees) and again at the onset of the event (introducing a sustained, fully-forward pitch-down command). The recorders have also shown that the captain’s seat moved at those times.




"The movement of the seat was linked to the movement of the side-stick, in the form of a Nikon Digital SLR camera obstruction which was in front of the captain’s left arm rest and behind the base of the Captain’s side-stick at the time of the event. Analysis of the camera has confirmed that it was being used in the three minutes leading up to the event.




"Furthermore, forensic analysis of damage to the body of the camera indicates that it experienced a significant compression against the base of the side-stick, consistent with having been jammed between the arm rest and the side-stick unit. Crew interviews have corroborated this evidence."




See also:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/service-inquiry-incident-involving-voyager-zz333-on-9-february-2014



Link Posted: 4/19/2016 6:58:10 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By maggiethecat:
i'm calling BS.  The elevator does not hang down low enough to interfere with loading anything that will fit.
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As a person who spent 9 years loading them with NGSLs, 60Ks, and 10K ATs, I will have to disagree with you.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 7:02:10 PM EDT


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Originally Posted By KatSnatchFever:
Wow....just, wow
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Originally Posted By KatSnatchFever:





Originally Posted By kfs35:
It happens. Whether it's fatigue, complacency or any number of external factors, it happens in both civil and military aviation.





Here's a longish article about the G-4 crash in Bedford MA caused by the gust lock being engaged.





Click here






Wow....just, wow
CVR data and pilot interviews revealed that checklists simply were not used. This was not an anomaly, it was standard operating procedure for them.

Flight control checks were not performed on this flight, nor were they ever performed. Hundreds of flights worth of data from the FDR and pilot interviews confirm it.
Normalization of risks...  When you get away with something repeatedly, and begin to (falsely) assume that it is safe to do so.  

 





See both Shuttle accidents for details.  







It's a very human trait, and that's why following the procedure is important...  It's also why it's important to make sure that the procedures aren't onerous.


 
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