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Posted: 10/6/2007 5:15:59 PM EST


CNN Pushes Gun Control in Philadelphia, Blames Concealed Carry for Crime
By Brad Wilmouth | October 6, 2007 - 17:49 ET

On Thursday's "Anderson Cooper 360," CNN's Randi Kaye filed a story in which she promoted gun control as a solution for Philadelphia's crime problems, as she pushed the argument that the city's high rate of gun violence was the result of Pennsylvania state lawmakers voting to loosen gun laws in the 1990s. And, as if criminals would bother to apply for a permit to legally carry a concealed weapon, Kaye further suggested that the availability of concealed carry permits has contributed to the city's problems. Kaye: "In 1995 there were fewer than 800 applications for concealed weapons here. 'Keeping Them Honest,' we checked, and today there are 29,000 permits to carry. And it's against the law for police to ask anyone why they want one. One law enforcement source told me permits to carry are being passed out like candy." A blog posting on the show's Web site based on this story can be seen here. (Transcript follows)

After a report by correspondent Jim Acosta that recounted the story of security guards who were attacked by a gunman in Philadelphia, Acosta mentioned that the city's police commissioner "took the nation's presidential candidates to task" for not making gun control an election issue. Host Anderson Cooper cited statistics on the number of armored car attacks in 2006, and then introduced Kaye's report as part of the show's regular "Keeping Them Honest" segment. While Cooper promised a look at "all the angles in a debate with deadly stakes," the report in no way examined the evidence that high rates of gun ownership can combat crime.

Kaye began her report complaining that in Philadelphia, "getting a gun is about as easy as ordering a pizza." The CNN correspondent featured clips of Philadelphia community activist Ray Jones Jr., and passed on his complaints about the city's inability to enact gun control laws because state law forbids it. Kaye: "More than 85 percent of the hundreds of murders in Philadelphia this year have been committed with a firearm. Jones blames state lawmakers for failing to pass tougher gun laws and preventing cities like Philadelphia from setting their own gun laws, even though they desperately want to."

Kaye then recounted that in the 1990s, the Pennsylvania state legislature overturned an assault weapons ban, made it easier to obtain a concealed weapons permit, and passed the Uniform Firearms Act, before introducing State Senator Vincent Fumo, a pro-gun Democrat from the state. Kaye started off challenging him: "A lot of people say that's what, it's this act that took away the power from cities."

After a soundbite of Fumo contending that "they're misinformed on that," Kaye's response suggested that the accessibility of concealed weapon permits presents a problem for Philadelphia's safety. Kaye: "In 1995 there were fewer than 800 applications for concealed weapons here. 'Keeping Them Honest,' we checked, and today there are 29,000 permits to carry. And it's against the law for police to ask anyone why they want one. One law enforcement source told me, permits to carry are being passed out like candy."

She then turned to gun control advocate David Kairys, a professor from Temple University, and, without challenge, relayed his desire to require registration and licensing of guns, and to limit the number of gun purchases. Kaye: "Constitutional law professor David Kairys believes if Philadelphia had home rule, a lot would change. Guns would have to be registered and licensed, and there would be a limit on gun purchases."

The story did not delve into any evidence that high rates of gun ownership can reduce crime, and only displayed soundbites from Fumo that made relatively weak arguments, such as arguing that "Last time I checked, we had a law against murder. It doesn't prevent people from killing people."

She again challenged the pro-gun Fumo: "The governor, the mayor, the D.A., they all want stricter gun laws here. They say that's the only way to reduce crime."

Kaye concluded: "So the tug of war over lawmaking continues, and so does the killing."

Below is a transcript of relevant portions from the Thursday October 4 "Anderson Cooper 360":

ANDERSON COOPER, after a story on the Philadelphia armored car robbery: Jim, the police commissioner has come under a lot of criticism for the way he's handling the high crime rate in the city. How did he respond to today's incident?

JIM ACOSTA: Well, this commissioner has offered the extraordinary and very controversial proposal to put 10,000 volunteers on the street to patrol the city's most violent neighborhoods, but he said today even 20,000 volunteers probably would not have made the difference this morning. But the commissioner also took the nation's presidential candidates to task today, saying they need to pay more attention to the issue of gun control. Anderson?

COOPER: All right. Jim Acosta, appreciate it. Hold-ups involving armored vehicles are actually very rare in America. Here's the raw data: The FBI reports 37 armored vehicle incidents in 2006 -- 30 involved the use of a firearm. Overall, more than $4 million were taken. The one person killed, though, in the armored car incident in 2006 was actually a suspect.

COOPER: Here's some more raw data. Pennsylvania lawmakers have voted year after year to loosen state gun laws. Most of the legislators did not represent big cities, but one of them does. And what's more, he led the charge to make it impossible for those same cities -- in this case, Philadelphia -- to enact their own tougher regulations. CNN's Randi Kaye now looking at all the angles in a debate with deadly stakes, "Keeping Them Honest."

RANDI KAYE: In Philadelphia, getting a gun is about as easy as ordering a pizza. Are guns flooding the streets here in Philadelphia?

RAY JONES, JR., Men United for a Better Philadelphia: Yes, they are.

KAYE: Each week, Ray Jones, along with other community volunteers, works to convince those most at risk of being shot or shooting someone to make smarter choices.

JONES: It's about survival. People are dying in the streets, and we need to help.

KAYE: That help, Jones says, isn't coming from the state. More than 85 percent of the hundreds of murders in Philadelphia this year have been committed with a firearm. Jones blames state lawmakers for failing to pass tougher gun laws and preventing cities like Philadelphia from setting their own gun laws, even though they desperately want to.

JONES: It really would be appropriate for the city to determine its own sort of destiny. Now our hands are sort of handcuffed.

KAYE: Back in 1994, a power struggle started when the legislature overturned an assault weapons ban, making AK-47s as easy to get as hunting rifles. The next year, rules were eased on concealed weapons. And Vincent Fumo, state senator and gun owner, pushed through the Uniform Firearms Act, making all gun laws uniform for the state of Pennsylvania. A lot of people say that's what, it's this act that took away the power from cities.

State Senator VINCENT FUMO (D-PA): No, they're misinformed. They're misinformed on that.

KAYE: In 1995 there were fewer than 800 applications for concealed weapons here. "Keeping Them Honest," we checked, and today there are 29,000 permits to carry. And it's against the law for police to ask anyone why they want one. One law enforcement source told me, permits to carry are being passed out like candy.

DAVID KAIRYS, Temple University: It's like the Wild West.

KAYE: Constitutional law professor David Kairys believes if Philadelphia had home rule, a lot would change. Guns would have to be registered and licensed, and there would be a limit on gun purchases. The way the law stands now-

DAVID KAIRYS, TEMPLE UNIVERSITY: You could buy 50, 100, whatever your credit card would take. Then you can resell them.

KAYE: Kairys thinks there would be stiffer penalties for so-called straw purchasers, too, who legally buy guns only to sell them to those who can't. There's no way of telling just how many legal or illegal guns are on the street. Police have no way of knowing since state law doesn't require gun owners register their weapons. Each year Philadelphia police recover about 7,000 guns -- so many guns they're running out of room, and so many shootings police have a backlog of weapons to examine, test fire, and trace back to the trigger man.

FUMO: People want to think that this is the Wild West, we don't have any laws. What we don't have is enforcement of those laws.

KAYE: Senator Fumo argues tougher gun laws alone won't stop shootings.

FUMO: Last time I checked, we had a law against murder. It doesn't prevent people from killing people.

KAYE: The governor, the mayor, the D.A., they all want stricter gun laws here. They say that's the only way to reduce crime.

FUMO: Sure, it's a great way to get away from enforcement. It's a great way of avoiding the issue of hiring more police.

KAYE: So the tug of war over lawmaking continues-

JONES: It's going to be a shooting gallery.

KAYE: -and so does the killing. Randi Kaye, CNN, Philadelphia.



newsbusters.org/blogs/brad-wilmouth/2007/10/06/cnn-pushes-gun-control-philadelphia-blames-concealed-carry-murder

Related story...


Philly gunning for more control
With more than 300 murders so far this year, Philadelphia has been struggling to contain gun violence.
If I was a Philadelphia resident, I could walk into any gun shop in the city and buy 50, 100, even 1,000 guns, just like that. All they would do is run an instant background check, and assuming my record was clean, I'd walk out with all that firepower.

There's no waiting period, no rules on who I can and can't sell those weapons to. In fact, state law says I don't even have to get a license for the guns or register them.

Could this be contributing to the gun violence in Philadelphia? So far this year, there have been more than 300 murders, and more than 85 percent of them were the result of a firearm, according to the Philadelphia Police Department.

Ray Jones, a community volunteer with the group Men United, blames state lawmakers for not passing tougher gun laws and for keeping cities like Philadelphia from passing their own regulations.

"It's about survival," Jones said. "People are dying in the streets and we need to get help."

The fight over gun laws has turned into a power struggle between the state government and Philadelphia.

Back in 1994, the state legislature overturned an assault weapons ban, making AK-47s as easy to get as hunting rifles. The next year, rules were eased on concealed weapons. Today it's actually against the law in Pennsylvania for a policeman to ask anyone why they want to carry a concealed weapon.

At last check, there are now 29,000 permits to carry concealed weapons in Philadelphia, compared to about 800 applications for permits back in 1995. One law enforcement source told me the state is handing out permits to carry like "candy."

State Senator Vincent Fumo is a gun owner, and he supports the current laws. "People want to think that this is the wild west, and we don't have any laws. What we don't have is enforcement of those laws," he told CNN.

Many here in the city argue that if Philadelphia had "home rule", as it's called, and the city was allowed to pass more stringent gun laws, people would be safer.

"It really would be appropriate for the city to determine its own sort of destiny," Jones told CNN. "Now our hands are sort of handcuffed."

Who do you think has the right to set the ground rules when it comes to guns? The state or the city?


www.cnn.com/CNN/Programs/anderson.cooper.360/blog/2007/10/philly-gunning-for-more-control.html

Link Posted: 10/6/2007 5:18:31 PM EST
People are the problems not the guns.

Guns don't walk down the street and shoot at babies. It takes someone with the intent to kill someone to do that.

Ignorance kills. Drugs are illegal yet the streets are flooded with them.

Prostitution is illegal yet there are hookers.

Theft is illegal yet there thieves.

Punish the people doing the crimes not the objects they are using.

Max
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 5:19:43 PM EST
360 degrees of stupid.
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 5:21:41 PM EST
People have brains yet remain dumb.
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 5:23:12 PM EST
Ratcheting up for 2008 elections!
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 5:24:12 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/6/2007 5:35:38 PM EST by John_Wayne777]
So here's my question....

How many of these crimes have been committed by people who were issued a concealed carry permit?

I mean, if concealed carry is worrying officials, clearly there has to be a concrete reason like a bunch of CHL holders running around shooting people willy nilly, right? I mean, if we're going to get our panties in a twist about the ability of law abiding citizens to pack a weapon for self defense then there has to be some numbers demonstrating that this spike in violence they are experiencing is the result of formerly law abiding CHL holders using their CHL powers for all sorts of nefarious deeds.

Otherwise the people complaining would be giant bed wetting pole smoking assclowns whose objection to people with CHLs is based on icky feelings and deranged fantasy.....and we all know that nobody could manage to achieve real power or be responsible for public safety if they were bed wetting pole smoking assclowns, right?



After a soundbite of Fumo contending that "they're misinformed on that," Kaye's response suggested that the accessibility of concealed weapon permits presents a problem for Philadelphia's safety. Kaye: "In 1995 there were fewer than 800 applications for concealed weapons here. 'Keeping Them Honest,' we checked, and today there are 29,000 permits to carry. And it's against the law for police to ask anyone why they want one. One law enforcement source told me, permits to carry are being passed out like candy."


If they are being "passed out like candy" then clearly there is some sort of criminal issue here that we can document. How many prohibited persons were issued a CHL? How many CHL holders have committed violent crimes with their permitted weapons?

If overturn of the assault weapons ban and an increase in the number of people carrying concealed handguns are really causing Philly to become a cesspool of violence, a simple search of arrest records should easily turn up all the horrific instances of violence the CHL holders are responsible....

And yet no citation of any of that is provided.

Makes one wonder, doesn't it?

Furthermore, this is puzzling:



JIM ACOSTA: Well, this commissioner has offered the extraordinary and very controversial proposal to put 10,000 volunteers on the street to patrol the city's most violent neighborhoods


So let me get this straight....people who are issued CHL's (29,000) are a dire concern to city officials because permits to carry a gun are handed out "like candy"...but the very same officials want to put out a 10,000 man "volunteer" force to "patrol the city's most violent neighborhoods."

What sort of background check would this 10,000 man volunteer force be subject to? Would it be more or less stringent than the background check for a CHL? If 29,000 people carrying a gun scares city officials, why wouldn't 10,000 people doing the job police officers are supposed to do not worry them?

What if 10,000 of Philly's CHL holders decided to organize on their own and patrol the city's most violent neighborhoods...would that be worrisome to police officials? If so, why would it be any more worrisome than the 10,000 man volunteer force discussed? At what point is it appropriate for citizens to take the matter of enforcing the law into their own hands? Further, if we concede that you want a 10,000 man volunteer force to try and combat crime because the police seem unable to stop it on their own, admitting that police are overwhelmed by the crime problem because there just aren't enough of them to be where they are needed all the time, why the objection to law abiding citizens who pass a thorough background check having ready access to a means of self defense equivalent to what police officers are issued?

Now folks, I'm not a reporter, and I'm not a reporter mainly because I have useful skills in life, but it seems to me that questions like the ones I am asking here would be pretty damned obvious to anyone with an IQ north of 30.
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 5:36:58 PM EST

...no rules regarding who I can and can't sell them too...

No, shitbag, it's called a straw-fucking-purchase and if you sold it to someone who can't legally possess a firearm then you get 10 years in Federal pound-me-in-the-ass prison for each illegal sale.

I guess that little bit of federal law is too inconvenient for his hit-piece on private firearms ownership, so he swept it under the rug. Assclown.


...state law says I don't even have to get a license for the guns or register them.

I see no problem here.


Back in 1994, the state legislature overturned an assault weapons ban, making AK-47s as easy to get as hunting rifles. The next year, rules were eased on concealed weapons. Today it's actually against the law in Pennsylvania for a policeman to ask anyone why they want to carry a concealed weapon.

Again, where the hell is the problem?


Link Posted: 10/6/2007 5:41:16 PM EST
tag
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 5:43:57 PM EST
The Commie News Network.
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 5:46:44 PM EST
Philthy-delphia.
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 5:59:48 PM EST
yea yea yea ...yawn
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 6:00:58 PM EST
Watch me not care


The left are idiots....nothing new.
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 6:01:57 PM EST
Its never the murdering thug with the lengthy arrest record who's to blame.

Link Posted: 10/6/2007 6:03:07 PM EST
Typical CNN bs
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 6:10:42 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 6:11:28 PM EST
Just on Fox: Supremes certain to take on DC case.



5sub
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 6:25:54 PM EST
Some one has to say it...

"SHUT UP CUNT!" -- Joe Rogan

LOL

Link Posted: 10/6/2007 6:38:15 PM EST
By reading the story you would think that a bunch CHL holders were the ones that robbed the armored car.
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 6:46:02 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/6/2007 6:47:48 PM EST by PeteCO]

Originally Posted By John_Wayne777:
So here's my question....

How many of these crimes have been committed by people who were issued a concealed carry permit?

I mean, if concealed carry is worrying officials, clearly there has to be a concrete reason like a bunch of CHL holders running around shooting people willy nilly, right? I mean, if we're going to get our panties in a twist about the ability of law abiding citizens to pack a weapon for self defense then there has to be some numbers demonstrating that this spike in violence they are experiencing is the result of formerly law abiding CHL holders using their CHL powers for all sorts of nefarious deeds.

Otherwise the people complaining would be giant bed wetting pole smoking assclowns whose objection to people with CHLs is based on icky feelings and deranged fantasy.....and we all know that nobody could manage to achieve real power or be responsible for public safety if they were bed wetting pole smoking assclowns, right?



After a soundbite of Fumo contending that "they're misinformed on that," Kaye's response suggested that the accessibility of concealed weapon permits presents a problem for Philadelphia's safety. Kaye: "In 1995 there were fewer than 800 applications for concealed weapons here. 'Keeping Them Honest,' we checked, and today there are 29,000 permits to carry. And it's against the law for police to ask anyone why they want one. One law enforcement source told me, permits to carry are being passed out like candy."


If they are being "passed out like candy" then clearly there is some sort of criminal issue here that we can document. How many prohibited persons were issued a CHL? How many CHL holders have committed violent crimes with their permitted weapons?

If overturn of the assault weapons ban and an increase in the number of people carrying concealed handguns are really causing Philly to become a cesspool of violence, a simple search of arrest records should easily turn up all the horrific instances of violence the CHL holders are responsible....

And yet no citation of any of that is provided.

Makes one wonder, doesn't it?

Furthermore, this is puzzling:



JIM ACOSTA: Well, this commissioner has offered the extraordinary and very controversial proposal to put 10,000 volunteers on the street to patrol the city's most violent neighborhoods


So let me get this straight....people who are issued CHL's (29,000) are a dire concern to city officials because permits to carry a gun are handed out "like candy"...but the very same officials want to put out a 10,000 man "volunteer" force to "patrol the city's most violent neighborhoods."

What sort of background check would this 10,000 man volunteer force be subject to? Would it be more or less stringent than the background check for a CHL? If 29,000 people carrying a gun scares city officials, why wouldn't 10,000 people doing the job police officers are supposed to do not worry them?

What if 10,000 of Philly's CHL holders decided to organize on their own and patrol the city's most violent neighborhoods...would that be worrisome to police officials? If so, why would it be any more worrisome than the 10,000 man volunteer force discussed? At what point is it appropriate for citizens to take the matter of enforcing the law into their own hands? Further, if we concede that you want a 10,000 man volunteer force to try and combat crime because the police seem unable to stop it on their own, admitting that police are overwhelmed by the crime problem because there just aren't enough of them to be where they are needed all the time, why the objection to law abiding citizens who pass a thorough background check having ready access to a means of self defense equivalent to what police officers are issued?

Now folks, I'm not a reporter, and I'm not a reporter mainly because I have useful skills in life, but it seems to me that questions like the ones I am asking here would be pretty damned obvious to anyone with an IQ north of 30.


Entire post quoted - for posterity.

JW's post above is the best refutation of this sort of dishonest and unethical journalism I've seen in a while.

The article is the usual tripe, but JW, your response above is a great critique.

Link Posted: 10/6/2007 6:46:35 PM EST
In phily, criminals in possesion of a gun, carrying without a permit or robbing a store with a gun recieve ANGER MANAGEMENT classes or prohbation.

Maybe that has something to do with their crime rate.
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 6:48:04 PM EST
FUCK Constant Negative News

they're supposed to REPORT the news, not make it up. asswipes
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 6:50:19 PM EST

Originally Posted By Procyon:
Ratcheting up for 2008 elections!


Only the truly stupid Dems are trying to make it an election issue. The rest (including most of the candidates themselves) are doing their very best to avoid even mentioning it.
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 8:22:06 PM EST
Okay, it's time for another my infamous rants. I am PISSED.




Originally Posted By LoginName:

CNN Pushes Gun Control in Philadelphia, Blames Concealed Carry for Crime
By Brad Wilmouth | October 6, 2007 - 17:49 ET

On Thursday's "Anderson Cooper 360," CNN's Randi Kaye filed a story in which she promoted gun control as a solution for Philadelphia's crime problems, as she pushed the argument that the city's high rate of gun violence was the result of Pennsylvania state lawmakers voting to loosen gun laws in the 1990s. And not, say, criminals being non-law-abiding scum? And, as if criminals would bother to apply for a permit to legally carry a concealed weapon, Kaye further suggested that the availability of concealed carry permits has contributed to the city's problems. Except that statistically, CCW holders are five times less likely to commit a crime than your average citizen, and don't they do a background check first? Kaye: "In 1995 there were fewer than 800 applications for concealed weapons here. 'Keeping Them Honest,' we checked, and today there are 29,000 permits to carry. And it's against the law for police to ask anyone why they want one. Actually, it's against the law to require someone to JUSTIFY their need for CCW. Subtle difference. One law enforcement source told me permits to carry are being passed out like candy." Yeah, except not. A blog posting on the show's Web site based on this story can be seen here. (Transcript follows)

After a report by correspondent Jim Acosta that recounted the story of security guards who were attacked by a gunman in Philadelphia, Who didn't have a CCW, by the way. Acosta mentioned that the city's police commissioner "took the nation's presidential candidates to task" for not making gun control an election issue. Well, since gun control lost Kerry and Gore their elections... Host Anderson Cooper cited statistics on the number of armored car attacks in 2006, How many were there? Very few, right? and then introduced Kaye's report as part of the show's regular "Keeping Them Honest" segment. While Cooper promised a look at "all the angles in a debate with deadly stakes," the report in no way examined the evidence that high rates of gun ownership can combat crime. 80 million gun owners, 240 million+ guns, both rates are rapidly increasing, and yet there are fewer than 10,000 homocides, including justifiable homocides in self-defense, suicides, accidents, etc. each year. In contrast, over two millions crime are PREVENTED by someone with a gun.

Kaye began her report complaining that in Philadelphia, "getting a gun is about as easy as ordering a pizza." So I can pick up a phonebook, find a gun shop, order any gun I want, have it delivered right to my door in thirty minutes or less, and pay less than twenty bucks for it? Bull fucking shit. The CNN correspondent featured clips of Philadelphia community activist Ray Jones Jr., and passed on his complaints about the city's inability to enact gun control laws because state law forbids it. So does the Constitution. Lemme guess, Ray wants to shit all over that too. Kaye: "More than 85 percent of the hundreds of murders in Philadelphia this year have been committed with a firearm. Really? Nationwide, most homocides are done with knives, blunt objects, strangulating objects (cords, rope, etc.), and bare hands than firearms of any type. Can we get some actual statistics instead of someone's hearsay to prove that Philadelphia is an exception to the rule? Jones blames state lawmakers for failing to pass tougher gun laws How about enforcing the laws against murder, rape, robbery, and assault instead of dicking with people's rights? Oh, right, that would involve you not having an ulterior agenda. My bad. and preventing cities like Philadelphia from setting their own gun laws, even though they desperately want to." The city has no authority to do so. The state does. Deal with it, asshole.

Kaye then recounted that in the 1990s, the Pennsylvania state legislature overturned an assault weapons ban, made it easier to obtain a concealed weapons permit, and passed the Uniform Firearms Act, before introducing State Senator Vincent Fumo, a pro-gun Democrat from the state. So they got rid of an unConstitutional ban that had zero effect on anyone but the law-abiding, made it easier for law-abiding citizens to defend themselves against criminals, I dunno what the UFA did, and they elected one of the rarest of all beasts: a pro-gun Democrat. Sounds like Pennsylvania had its shit together in the 90's. Kaye started off challenging him: "A lot of people say that's what, it's this act that took away the power from cities." Again, cities don't have the authority. You know what the difference is between a law and a city ordinance? A city ordinance is unenforcable. Sure, it's against the rules, but you can't do shit to stop me.

After a soundbite of Fumo contending that "they're misinformed on that," He's more polite and a lot more patient with these cock-sucking fascist rat-bastard sons of bitches than I would be. Asswipes. Kaye's response suggested that the accessibility of concealed weapon permits presents a problem for Philadelphia's safety. Bullshit. They said the same shit in every other state to enact CCW. It didn't lead to increased crime rates in any of those states, and it didn't lead to increased crime rates in your shitty city either. And again, CCW holders are still five times more law-abiding than the average citizen. Kaye: "In 1995 there were fewer than 800 applications for concealed weapons here. 'Keeping Them Honest,' we checked, and today there are 29,000 permits to carry. And it's against the law for police to ask anyone why they want one. One law enforcement source told me, permits to carry are being passed out like candy." Wait- Didn't we just read this? WTF?

She then turned to gun control advocate David Kairys, a professor from Temple University, and, without challenge, relayed his desire to require registration and licensing of guns, Which Lenin, Stalin, Hitler, etc. all agreed was the first step to banning them entirely. and to limit the number of gun purchases. You can't tell me how many magazines full of naked women I can buy in a month any more than you can tell me how many guns to buy a month. You can't tell me how much toilet paper I can use every time I take a shit. You can't tell me how many candy bars I can buy at the convenience store. So fuck off, you fascist dickweed. Kaye: "Constitutional law professor David Kairys believes if Philadelphia had home rule, a lot would change. Yeah, and if Ted Kennedy were in charge, guns would be banned and liquor would be free to worthless murderers too fucking wasted to tell anyone he'd killed a girl until the next fucking day. If wishes were horses, then beggars would ride. Keep dreaming, and wipe the cum off your chin. Guns would have to be registered and licensed, and there would be a limit on gun purchases." You still have to prove that guns, rather than criminals, are a problem. Shit, fuck you you fucking fuckity fuck of a fuckstick. I'm sick of hearing your bullshit lies every single fucking day when I turn on the tv, open a newspaper, or log onto the internet. Go to hell.

The story did not delve into any evidence that high rates of gun ownership can reduce crime, and only displayed soundbites from Fumo that made relatively weak arguments, such as arguing that "Last time I checked, we had a law against murder. It doesn't prevent people from killing people." Well, there you go.

She again challenged the pro-gun Fumo: "The governor, the mayor, the D.A., they all want stricter gun laws here. And they can go piss up a rope. They say that's the only way to reduce crime." Except that D.C., where guns are illegal entirely, has the single highest crime rate and murder rate in the nation. Chicago and Detroit, both with incredibly restrictive gun control, follow right behind D.C. for the murder capital of the US. Vermont allows citizens to carry concealed without a permit or background check of any kind and remains one of the top five safest states in the nation, winning the award for THE safest state three times. Kennesaw, Georgia passed a mandatory law requiring all citizens to be armed (again, it can't enforce this law because city ordinances don't mean shit), and the burglary rate dropped 89% IMMEDIATELY. It's still 72% below where it was before the law requiring all citizens to own and carry a firearm. Blows your shitty little boat right out of the fucking water, now doesn't it. Bitch.

Kaye concluded: "So the tug of war over lawmaking continues, and so does the killing." Every nation that enacted a total gun ban later enacted genocide. The least of these killed tens of thousands of unarmed civilians. The worst killed tens of millions of men, women, and children who had done nothing. In the 20th century, 200 million men, women, and children were exterminated by their own governments. In every case, this followed total disarmament. In the Warsaw Ghetto, a mere thirteen Jews armed with pistols and rifles held off hundreds of elite German troops armed with machine guns, grenades, and tanks for weeks, until the Nazis got sick of it and bombed them with aircraft. So fuck you. I'll keep my guns and I'll put a bullet in the skull of any son of a bitch that try to take them from me and leave me for the wolves.

Below is a transcript of relevant portions from the Thursday October 4 "Anderson Cooper 360":

ANDERSON COOPER, after a story on the Philadelphia armored car robbery: Jim, the police commissioner has come under a lot of criticism for the way he's handling the high crime rate in the city. How did he respond to today's incident? With bullshit about how it's the law-abiding citizen's fault that he's an incompetent twat waffle.

JIM ACOSTA: Well, this commissioner has offered the extraordinary and very controversial proposal to put 10,000 volunteers on the street to patrol the city's most violent neighborhoods, Oh, so HE'S the guy who asked 10,000 unarmed black men to patrol the ghetto. Why did he specify BLACK men again, if he isn't racist, and why insist that people in the most dangerous part of town be unarmed while trying to prevent crime? How about we force all the police in Philadelphia to do their jobs with no guns, no tasers, no pepper spray, no batons, nothing but their bare hands. Hmm? Fucking retarded, isn't it. but he said today even 20,000 volunteers probably would not have made the difference this morning. Since most of them were probably in on it, I'd have to agree. But the commissioner also took the nation's presidential candidates to task today, saying they need to pay more attention to the issue of gun control. We need less gun control. There, problem solved. Anderson?

COOPER: All right. Jim Acosta, appreciate it. Hold-ups involving armored vehicles are actually very rare in America. Here's the raw data: The FBI reports 37 armored vehicle incidents in 2006 -- 30 involved the use of a firearm. Overall, more than $4 million were taken. The one person killed, though, in the armored car incident in 2006 was actually a suspect. Here's the wind-up, the bitch, and the slap. Thank you Cooper.

COOPER: Here's some more raw data. Pennsylvania lawmakers have voted year after year to loosen state gun laws. Most of the legislators did not represent big cities, but one of them does. And what's more, he led the charge to make it impossible for those same cities -- in this case, Philadelphia -- to enact their own tougher regulations. CNN's Randi Kaye now looking at all the angles in a debate with deadly stakes, "Keeping Them Honest."

RANDI KAYE: In Philadelphia, getting a gun is about as easy as ordering a pizza. Well yeah, what with the criminal background check, fifteen day waiting period, prices ranging from several hundred to several thousand dollars, and the limits on how many pizzas I can buy in a month, you're darn straight it's as easy to get a gun as a pizza. Oh, wait. Are guns flooding the streets here in Philadelphia? No more so than the piss flowing in your streets from all the homeless people and drunks, I'm sure.

RAY JONES, JR., Men United for a Better Philadelphia: Yes, they are. And who the fuck are you again?

KAYE: Each week, Ray Jones, along with other community volunteers, works to convince those most at risk of being shot or shooting someone to make smarter choices. They're running around in Iraq and giving our soldiers tactical advice? Or are you telling me they know who, in the US, is going to be mugged by a drug addict next? If they know this shoot, then why not give out free body armor and send in guys with machine guns to defend whoever is going to get shot next? Is this like some department of pre-crime or something?

JONES: It's about survival. And a gun gives me an automatic advantage in terms of surviving violence against my person. At the very least it's an equalizer. How many elderly people, petite girls, and nerds are going to be able to fend off some career criminal tripped out on meth and trying to beat their heads in with a crowbar? People are dying in the streets, and we need to help. So have a free gun and kevlar day. Give 'em out to anybody who wants one.

KAYE: That help, Jones says, isn't coming from the state. More than 85 percent of the hundreds of murders in Philadelphia this year have been committed with a firearm. Again, where are actual statistics and not simple hearsay by someone with a clear agenda? And if a city has hundreds of murders, it sounds to me like you need to do a little more house cleaning and a little less sucking Brady's dick. Jones blames state lawmakers for failing to pass tougher gun laws and preventing cities like Philadelphia from setting their own gun laws, even though they desperately want to. Again, YOU HAVE NO SUCH AUTHORITY.

JONES: It really would be appropriate for the city to determine its own sort of destiny. Now our hands are sort of handcuffed. Cry me a river. Bitch.

KAYE: Back in 1994, a power struggle started when the legislature overturned an assault weapons ban, making AK-47s as easy to get as hunting rifles. Oh let's not start this shit for the ten thousandth time this week. The next year, rules were eased on concealed weapons. Say it with me: LAW. ABIDING. CITIZENS. And Vincent Fumo, state senator and gun owner, pushed through the Uniform Firearms Act, making all gun laws uniform for the state of Pennsylvania. Wow, what a travesty of justice THAT was. A lot of people say that's what, it's this act that took away the power from cities. Waaa, I don't have control over the lives of others so I'm gonna cry like a little bitch, waaaa. Fuck you.

State Senator VINCENT FUMO (D-PA): No, they're misinformed. They're misinformed on that. No they're not, they're lying bastards. They know exactly what is what and they don't care; they just want to control our lives.

KAYE: In 1995 there were fewer than 800 applications for concealed weapons here. "Keeping Them Honest," we checked, and today there are 29,000 permits to carry. And it's against the law for police to ask anyone why they want one. One law enforcement source told me, permits to carry are being passed out like candy. How many fucking times are we going to repeat this soundbite in one fucking article?!

DAVID KAIRYS, Temple University: It's like the Wild West. I sincerely doubt that your college has daily shootouts. Incidentally, the wild west had a far lower crime rate than today. Murder was limited to transient males involved in bar fights or gambling. Robbery was extremely rare. Rape was almost unknown. Basically, most of the violence was between the military and the various indian tribes. I don't think you've got Apache burning your homes or US cavalry charging in and shooting your women and children while you're out getting dinner.

KAYE: Constitutional law professor David Kairys believes if Philadelphia had home rule, a lot would change. Guns would have to be registered and licensed, and there would be a limit on gun purchases. The way the law stands now- I'd say Kairys is Master of the fucking Obvious.

DAVID KAIRYS, TEMPLE UNIVERSITY: You could buy 50, 100, whatever your credit card would take. Then you can resell them. And yet no one does that. Huh.

KAYE: Kairys thinks there would be stiffer penalties for so-called straw purchasers, too, who legally buy guns only to sell them to those who can't. You mean twenty years in prison and mandatory loss of the right to own a firearm isn't enough? There's no way of telling just how many legal or illegal guns are on the street. 240 million+ guns in the US. Police have no way of knowing since state law doesn't require gun owners register their weapons. Registration would only involve the law-abiding, you worthless prick. Stop bullshitting us; this isn't about 'crime', it's about you disarming everyone so you can run your own agenda. Each year Philadelphia police recover about 7,000 guns -- so many guns they're running out of room, and so many shootings police have a backlog of weapons to examine, test fire, and trace back to the trigger man.I want real numbers, not just he-said, she-said.

FUMO: People want to think that this is the Wild West, we don't have any laws. The wild west had laws against murder, rape, and robbery and got by just fine with those. What we don't have is enforcement of those laws. Kiss my ass.

KAYE: Senator Fumo argues tougher gun laws alone won't stop shootings. Truth.

FUMO: Last time I checked, we had a law against murder. It doesn't prevent people from killing people. Hey, somebody gets it.

KAYE: The governor, the mayor, the D.A., they all want stricter gun laws here. They say that's the only way to reduce crime. And they're all fascist dumbasses, like you.

FUMO: Sure, it's a great way to get away from enforcement. It's a great way of avoiding the issue of hiring more police. There's that too.

KAYE: So the tug of war over lawmaking continues- Only because you and your ilk insist on continually trying to violate the Constitution and deprive law-abiding people of their God-given rights. You know what happened when the British pulled that shit on us? WE SHOT THEIR ASSES AND THREW THEM OUT.

JONES: It's going to be a shooting gallery. No, it's not.

KAYE: -and so does the killing. Randi Kaye, CNN, Philadelphia. Blow me.



newsbusters.org/blogs/brad-wilmouth/2007/10/06/cnn-pushes-gun-control-philadelphia-blames-concealed-carry-murder

Related story...


Philly gunning for more control
With more than 300 murders so far this year, Philadelphia has been struggling to contain gun violence. How about just violence?
If I was a Philadelphia resident, I could walk into any gun shop in the city and buy 50, 100, even 1,000 guns, just like that. Let's assume for the moment that we go with the lowest price I have ever seen for even the shittiest gun, $200. $200 for 50 guns is $10,000 in one purchase. $200,000 for your 1,000 guns number. And since the majority of firearms cost upwards of $500, I'm going to go on record as saying that you're so full of fucking shit no wonder you spew it all over the place. All they would do is run an instant background check, and assuming my record was clean, I'd walk out with all that firepower. So, you're saying it's a problem if people with no criminal records buy a gun?

There's no waiting period, Waiting periods have killed people, like Bonnie Elmasri, Corporal Rayna Ross, and victims of the L.A. riots. no rules on who I can and can't sell those weapons to. There's no rules on who I can and can't sell my lighter to, my computer to, my car to, my house to, or my fucking dick if I decide to cut it off and sell it on ebay. In fact, state law says I don't even have to get a license for the guns or register them. UnConstitutional infringements that inevitably lead to total bans, which inevitably lead to genocide. I'm not feeling any sympathy for your argument here.

Could this be contributing to the gun violence in Philadelphia? No. And banning gun shows to prevent crime is like banning car shows to prevent drunk driving. So far this year, there have been more than 300 murders, and more than 85 percent of them were the result of a firearm, according to the Philadelphia Police Department. Finally, we get a source on this quote. Except we don't have an actual, official report, so it still doesn't mean shit. For all we know, they made up the numbers and just credited them to the PD.

Ray Jones, a community volunteer with the group Men United, Sounds like a bunch of queers. blames state lawmakers for not passing tougher gun laws and for keeping cities like Philadelphia from passing their own regulations. Mr. Jones, I'm going to piss on your shoes if we ever meet in person. I hope this isn't an inconvenience for you since you're pissing all over my rights as both an American and a human being.

"It's about survival," Jones said. "People are dying in the streets and we need to get help." No need to cover this one again.

The fight over gun laws has turned into a power struggle between the state government and Philadelphia. And Philadelphia answers to the state government and is not its own authority in such matters. So this is like the guy in the mail room trying to make and enforce his own policies in violation of the company he works for.

Back in 1994, the state legislature overturned an assault weapons ban, making AK-47s as easy to get as hunting rifles. The next year, rules were eased on concealed weapons. Today it's actually against the law in Pennsylvania for a policeman to ask anyone why they want to carry a concealed weapon. Already covered.

At last check, there are now 29,000 permits to carry concealed weapons in Philadelphia, compared to about 800 applications for permits back in 1995. One law enforcement source told me the state is handing out permits to carry like "candy." Holy fucking shit, how many times is this, five?

State Senator Vincent Fumo is a gun owner, and he supports the current laws. "People want to think that this is the wild west, and we don't have any laws. What we don't have is enforcement of those laws," he told CNN. The Communist News Network has its own agenda too.

Many here in the city argue that if Philadelphia had "home rule", as it's called, and the city was allowed to pass more stringent gun laws, people would be safer. "Those who sacrifice essential liberty for temporary safety are deserving of neither liberty nor safety." -Benjamin Franklin.

"It really would be appropriate for the city to determine its own sort of destiny," Jones told CNN. "Now our hands are sort of handcuffed." Sorry, I saw his lips moving, but all I could hear was the Russian Red Army Choir. Man, communists sure got some bitchin' marching music. Sousa's got nothing on their red asses.

Who do you think has the right to set the ground rules when it comes to guns? The state or the city? The state. Duh.


www.cnn.com/CNN/Programs/anderson.cooper.360/blog/2007/10/philly-gunning-for-more-control.html



Well, that got my blood pressure up.
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 8:39:13 PM EST
Holy shit Swindle.

Impressive.

Need a drink?
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 9:11:47 PM EST

Originally Posted By PantherArms762:
Holy shit Swindle.

Impressive.

Need a drink?


Fuck yes. I'm out of Dr. Pepper, none of the stores in my area (and I mean NONE) have it in stock, and I'm frigging pissed.
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 9:15:55 PM EST

Originally Posted By Swindle1984:

Originally Posted By PantherArms762:
Holy shit Swindle.

Impressive.

Need a drink?


Fuck yes. I'm out of Dr. Pepper, none of the stores in my area (and I mean NONE) have it in stock, and I'm frigging pissed.


Ahhh, that explains it.
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 9:48:31 PM EST
Damn Swindle, that is a good rant. I give you 10/10.
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 11:25:04 PM EST
^^^
+1 that's what my tag was for

I'm always amazed how disingenuous these anti-gun bureaucrats are...
Blaming Philly's problems on ccw!!?? Puuuuuhleeeeaaaze
Link Posted: 10/6/2007 11:37:26 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/6/2007 11:50:55 PM EST by RetroRevolver77]
Fuck it, we all know what we would do.
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 12:09:50 AM EST
We need to relocate the Liberty Bell out of that shit hole.
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 8:52:45 AM EST

Originally Posted By themagikbullet:
^^^
+1 that's what my tag was for

I'm always amazed how disingenuous these anti-gun bureaucrats are...
Blaming Philly's problems on ccw!!?? Puuuuuhleeeeaaaze


What, you were waiting for me to rant again?
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 9:19:43 AM EST
Typicall Philly crap.
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 9:21:35 AM EST
They will blame shit on flies next.


Oh, wait, they have tried to blame fat people on Mc Donalds.
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 9:21:37 AM EST
Reading this bullshit enrages me. How the fuck can some people be SO stupid?

I hope these fucks get shot.
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 9:32:42 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/7/2007 9:37:29 AM EST by The_Biased_Observer]
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 1:36:55 PM EST

Originally Posted By Hemi-Cuda:
Reading this bullshit enrages me. How the fuck can some people be SO stupid?

I hope these fucks get shot beat to death with a baseball bat.


Oh what sweet irony that would be. Kind of like Sarah Brady and lung cancer.
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 1:38:56 PM EST
We are neck deep in guns here in West Texas but our little old city has experienced only 14 murders this year. Not bad for a city of 600,000 sitting right next door to Mexico. Now if we scale our population to Phillys then we would experience something like 30 murders vs their 300+. Wonder what accounts for that difference.

BTW the local city police department is some 300 plus officers short yet they get the job done.
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 1:58:47 PM EST
I"m sick of "the blame game". Let's blame an inanimate object for all the crime thats going on. Or let's blame the gun manufacturers for making a dangerous and murderous weapon.

Whenever I come across a liberal with this mentality, I piss them off with "flies cause garbage like guns cause crime".
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 2:00:30 PM EST

Originally Posted By The_Biased_Observer:
Philly police cheif calls for more gun control


Yeah, maybe criminals with obey the next gun law.
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 2:03:46 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/7/2007 2:04:50 PM EST by TacticalOpsAR]


FUMO: Last timeI checked, we had a law against murder. It doesn't prevent people from killing people.

KAYE: The governor, the mayor, the D.A., they all want stricter gun laws here. They say that's the only way to reduce crime.






Link Posted: 10/7/2007 2:13:35 PM EST

Originally Posted By Swindle1984:

Originally Posted By themagikbullet:
^^^
+1 that's what my tag was for

I'm always amazed how disingenuous these anti-gun bureaucrats are...
Blaming Philly's problems on ccw!!?? Puuuuuhleeeeaaaze


What, you were waiting for me to rant again?


definitely hoping for a good rant
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 2:26:58 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/7/2007 2:27:23 PM EST by Jacketch]
According to their reasoning, the violent crime rate could be blamed on the high number of Democrats.

On another note and somewhat more calming:

What a wonderful world.
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 2:38:23 PM EST
The commies have been after PA for years as our gun rights laws and CCW are much stronger than most surrounding states in the NE. The Communist News Network will never tell you that nearly no one in Philly is willing to help the police bring the shooters to justice...

It's the old "nobody saw nothing" in the city of "brotherly love," and I'd bet it's the same shooters and gang bangers partaking in the violence. You will never hear the media say Philly has a gang problem, or that Philliy's citizens won't cooperate with the police. They'd rather carry on with their anti-gun hysteria and condition the masses with their propaganda nonsense.

Link Posted: 10/7/2007 2:41:25 PM EST

Originally Posted By Procyon:
Ratcheting up for 2008 elections!
Ditto, the decibels will get even higher a time passes, just in time for the 2008 elections. The news media has canned a lot of this stuff, and just waiting for the correct time to publish. So better hang on to your hats, things are starting to get interesting.
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 2:43:59 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/7/2007 2:44:20 PM EST by MR_DOMINO]
Amazing how these dumbasses fall for this crap.
That philly police cheif is calling for gun control, but will be nowhere to be found if some scumbag tries to kick in your front door.
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 3:16:52 PM EST

Originally Posted By BIKECOP29:


Whenever I come across a liberal with this mentality, I piss them off with "flies cause garbage like guns cause crime".


Now that is a very quotable quote.
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 5:09:59 PM EST
Oddly enough, CNN used an indicted Democrat as their pro-gun foil, a state senator who once called the NRA "hogs."


Posted on Tue, Feb. 6, 2007
Fumo is indicted
www.philly.com/inquirer/special/fumo/5596931.html
By John Shiffman and Emilie Lounsberry

INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo defrauded a multimillion-dollar charity, used Senate staff for personal and political errands, and engaged in a cover-up after the FBI and IRS began to investigate him, a grand jury charged today.

Fumo, 63, is charged with 139 counts of conspiracy, fraud, obstruction of justice, and filing false tax returns. If convicted, he faces two to 10 years imprisonment.

The 267-page indictment alleged that Fumo, a South Philadelphia Democrat and one of Pennsylvania's most powerful politicians, exploited the neighborhood charity he helped create and controlled: Citizens Alliance for Better Neighborhoods.

"Besides relying on his income and assets to support his lifestyle, Fumo regularly endeavored to gain personal benefits and gratuities from others, including entities over which he had influence, such as the Senate [and] a nonprofit organization he established and controlled, Citizens Alliance. . . .

"Fumo stated to a close confidant his philosophy that a person is best advised to spend 'other people's money,' " the grand jury said. "Fumo often referred to this goal by the acronym OPM."

The grand jury also alleged that Fumo used his legislative staff for personal and political purposes.
Link Posted: 10/7/2007 7:26:45 PM EST
no no, the tag was for the rant you already did... bad wording i guess
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 11:32:54 AM EST

Originally Posted By themagikbullet:
no no, the tag was for the rant you already did... bad wording i guess


Shut up and go find me another article to tear apart, peon!
Link Posted: 10/8/2007 11:57:51 AM EST
OST
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