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Posted: 1/6/2003 6:30:13 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/6/2003 6:37:30 PM EST by Kaliburz]
Done, simple question. Sorry if some of the choices are not clear. I figured I'd ask.... (nosey). [:D] Any how, if you would like to comment on how you feel about CC payments (if the choices don't cover it), do so.
Link Posted: 1/6/2003 7:04:59 PM EST
I have two credit cards that I own purely for emergency use. Both have a relatively large credit limit, and I have not had a balance on either of them for years. Credit card debt is evil and I hate it! I don't even like having my car loan, and I am going to pay that off when I get my summer check this year - and then drive that Volvo into the ground! Say it with me - credit card debt is evil !!!
Link Posted: 1/6/2003 7:19:34 PM EST
Well, I don't have anymore credit cards, and obviously, if I can't pay cash, I don't get it. It sucks being broke though.
Link Posted: 1/6/2003 7:37:18 PM EST
If you use your credit card on regular basis, I suggest you get the one with rebates. Whether it be cash back, or earn points for purchase of new car. It really adds up after one year.
Link Posted: 1/6/2003 8:09:09 PM EST
Very true.... CC debt is bad... especially when "out of control".....
Link Posted: 1/6/2003 9:03:41 PM EST
Why pay today when you can, if you time your purchase right, have about 6 and a half weeks to pay. That's the main reason I use credit cards as I pay off the balance in total [i]every[/i]time.
Link Posted: 1/6/2003 9:30:22 PM EST
Originally Posted By Lazyshooter: Why pay today when you can, if you time your purchase right, have about 6 and a half weeks to pay. That's the main reason I use credit cards as I pay off the balance in total [i]every[/i]time.
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My thinking, exactly. I gain interest on my money for 6-8 weeks, pay the bill when it comes due. I got back $140 from Discover last year.
Link Posted: 1/7/2003 6:54:00 AM EST
Oh, I thought this was a concealed carry survey. My wife is in charge of the credit cards but I'm in charge of the cash. Rambosky
Link Posted: 1/7/2003 7:17:32 AM EST
I've got ONE card. Don't use it for everyday purchases and pay the total bill every month. Have never paid one cent of interest to them.
Link Posted: 1/7/2003 7:21:28 AM EST
I don't use credit cards. Ever! At least as far as charging anything on them! I do make reservations using one card, and one card only! It's my actual bank card for accessing my checking account. I've been filing bankruptcies for folks ever since Jimmy Carter was President (1979), and I have never filed a personal bankruptcy for anyone that didn't have credit cards. Lots of them. Maxed out! So I figure, if I never use any, I'll never file bankruptcy! Eric The(YouLiveYouLearn)Hun[>]:)]
Link Posted: 1/7/2003 7:23:27 AM EST
Link Posted: 1/7/2003 7:47:22 AM EST
I have a Discover card and a Visa check card that my bank sent me. I use the credit card for a lot of my purchases, but I [b]always[/b] pay off the balance in full every month. I have never paid a cent of credit card interest. It's more convenient then carrying cash around, plus I get about 1% cash back on everything I put on the Discover. Not much, but better then nothing. IMHO, using a credit card to buy things you can't afford and paying the 20% interest on them is the height of stupidity, and a quick way to get in deep trouble. What really makes me wonder is when our local (very liberal) campus newspaper printed an article about how "Credit card companies are screwing the poor college students by giving them credit that they can't handle." So these people have managed to get into college, but can't figure out how credit works? And it's the credit card companies' fault if they can't handle their money? What BS.
Link Posted: 1/7/2003 8:12:00 AM EST
I try to avoid using my credit card for anything other than things like gas and text books. As a poor college student, I am more just trying to build a good credit record than anything. Of course I do have the occasional L.L. Bean order, since I get free shipping if I use my card. I try to pay the balance off every month if possible, but started having problems with that last year when gas went up to 1.75$ per gallon. Made me want to give up the truck and buy a Civic or something that got well over twice the gas mileage. I do use my bank check card quite often, but that is almost the same as cash to me. Very rarely do I carry more than 10$ cash on me. Of course I have gotten in trouble when I get somewhere that only takes cash.
Link Posted: 1/7/2003 8:15:11 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/7/2003 8:18:44 AM EST by Lazyshooter]
The main problem with credit cards, is of course, that all your purchases are "tracked". The other bad thing, if you travel a lot is, they are almost a requirement for the airlines, hotels and car rental. In fact, as far back as the early seventies, believe it or not, when hardly anybody had credit cards and when my family was in a car accident in Wisconsin, the car rental place wouldn't even rent my father a car unless he had a credit card. Eventually he was able to use his work id, and driver's license which they called and checked out, to get us a car for a few days. I've got one credit card, believe it or not, that I have to drop that still charges a small annual fee, and I am a sucker to pay it since I have other cards. Unfortunately, this is the only card that I have memorized all the numbers and the expiration date, so I can use it to purchase things, at least over the phone, even without the card in hand. Since I've held this card the longest, it also has the largest credit line. Note to self: Memorize the numbers on another card and drop this one.
Link Posted: 1/7/2003 8:43:40 AM EST
I have several and use them for just about every purchase. You get a record of purchase,air miles and extra warr on somethings. If you travel you cant get around with out one. I paid a $49.00 fee once and the first FREE plane ticket covered that and the next few years of the miles program. I think the people who think credit cards are evil should look a little closer at themselves. Here is something we all understand and have heard before. Guns dont kill people In the same vain Credit cards dont bankrupt people. Selfcontrol is not just about that cream you put on your johnson
Link Posted: 1/7/2003 9:03:49 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/7/2003 9:04:13 AM EST by markl32]
I have been using a CC, reaping the 1% cash back at an out door store (REI), and paying it off each month. However I have learned credit cards are the ultimate tracking tool. Spending habits, product preference, personal schedule, travel patterns, and probably much more can be gleaned from credit card records. With information security and the value of information what it is, all that data is available to anyone willing to pay (and probably free to the government). Even though I never carry any debt I am phasing out the card. Call me paranoid but I fear a cash-less society. The damn 1% cash back carrot had me hooked in.
Link Posted: 1/7/2003 9:21:29 AM EST
i hate credit cards ever since i racked up 3k in debt and had to have my family bail me out. Hate oweing them the money more (feeling of WTF did i do that didnt much money to begin with etc etc etc.
Link Posted: 1/7/2003 9:36:09 AM EST
Think MasterCard or VISA will come out with an AR15 CC?
Link Posted: 1/7/2003 10:24:35 AM EST
Originally Posted By u-baddog: I have several and use them for just about every purchase. You get a record of purchase,air miles and extra warr on somethings. If you travel you cant get around with out one. I paid a $49.00 fee once and the first FREE plane ticket covered that and the next few years of the miles program. I think the people who think credit cards are evil should look a little closer at themselves.
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Don't know if you're referring to my post or not. My point is that credit card DEBT is evil - not the credit cards themselves. (I fear giant squid - not credit cards [:D] ) I don't see anything wrong with people using crdit cards extensively and then paying off the balance every month. My fiancee uses here amex for practically everything, and pays it off each month (obviously, since it's an amex). That's not a problem - carrying a large balance is. I completely agree with you that the problem is ultimately one of self-control, because credit card debt obviously doesn't appear out of nowhere. I can control credit card use and you can control credit card use - but many people (especially younger people) cannot.
Link Posted: 1/7/2003 10:58:05 AM EST
Knowing they are paid off and getting to cut them up with scissors is a good feeling. I'll be so glad when the last one bites the bullet.
Link Posted: 1/7/2003 4:27:53 PM EST
Originally Posted By RAMBOSKY: Oh, I thought this was a concealed carry survey. My wife is in charge of the credit cards but I'm in charge of the cash. Rambosky
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Opps... I guess I should have spelled it out...
Link Posted: 1/7/2003 4:34:59 PM EST
I carry almost no cash, and use my credit card for everything. I then pay it off each month. (all but $25 of my paycheck gets electronically (sp?) deposited into my Credit Union accounts) On top of that, I get 5% earnings towards a new truck! (I have a GMCard)
Link Posted: 1/7/2003 7:43:01 PM EST
I racked up quite a chunk o change in college. Even after I got a good paying job - it was taking forever [b]until[/b] I started graphing it. Then I saw the trend. Month 1) Look at credit card bill EEEEEK Month 2) Put down every last spare penny on credit card bill. Month 3) Think... man it's been 3 months since I did anything fun. KERCHUNK. Graphing my credit card debt was the step that helped me pay it off. I managed to get back in once - but now that's paid off, I've been well over a year and not paid a dime of credit card interest, and plan to keep it that way. (Yeah, I thought it was about concealed carry too.)
Link Posted: 1/7/2003 8:07:07 PM EST
Originally Posted By ORM-D: I racked up quite a chunk o change in college. Even after I got a good paying job - it was taking forever [b]until[/b] I started graphing it. Then I saw the trend. Month 1) Look at credit card bill EEEEEK Month 2) Put down every last spare penny on credit card bill. Month 3) Think... man it's been 3 months since I did anything fun. KERCHUNK. Graphing my credit card debt was the step that helped me pay it off. I managed to get back in once - but now that's paid off, I've been well over a year and not paid a dime of credit card interest, and plan to keep it that way. (Yeah, I thought it was about concealed carry too.)
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Yup,..... I hear you. 1- stop using them 2- pay as much as you can on them.
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