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11/9/2018 9:21:38 PM
Posted: 11/1/2018 9:15:30 PM EST
I want to buy a DSLR for my wife as a gift. She was quite into photography some time ago, but most everything she did was with film; lately she's expressed an interest in getting a DSLR and picking it up again.

We were in a store recently and she looked at a few of the display models. I tried to pry for details but I wasn't able to get much out of her other than she liked the Canon Rebel line because of how it felt and apparently it works with her old lenses?

Anyway, if I google "Canon Rebel" I get about a billion results with pricing ranging from about $300 close to $1,000. I'm not really bothered by price, other than I don't know if the more expensive models have features that are worth it for most users, or if they just get more difficult to use?

Sorry, I have zero clue as to what I am looking at or for, so I'm looking for some help here as to what to get...
Link Posted: 11/1/2018 10:58:55 PM EST
Pick up the current entry level Cannon or Nikon system at Costco or wherever. And no you don't need a stamp.
Link Posted: 11/1/2018 11:20:00 PM EST
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Originally Posted By usmcmp:
Pick up the current entry level Cannon or Nikon system at Costco or wherever. And no you don't need a stamp.
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Canon lenses have changed mounts over the years. Old film camera lenses, from back in the AE1 days won't work on the new digital cameras.

Nikon still uses the F mount on their DSLR cameras. Some features of the lens may not work depending on the camera body, but they will all mount up and work manually. This does not include the Nikon 1 bodies or the new Z series of mirror less cameras. They use there own lens mount type.
Link Posted: 11/1/2018 11:38:13 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/1/2018 11:38:55 PM EST by Zack3g]
Link Posted: 11/2/2018 12:55:03 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Zack3g:
This is actually terrible advice, especially for someone that's been into photography previously or has an interest in learning.

The entry level cameras often have features missing, disabled, or crippled in some way or buried in menus whereas the cameras higher up on the chain have convenient buttons and do more useful stuff.

My advice is to buy the best camera you can afford. A used one from a higher tier last generation model is better than a new lower tiered one at the same or reasonably close price point.

I can't speak to Canon specifically as I'm not much into those, but as a general rule, the advice above should hold true for most brands.
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Originally Posted By Zack3g:
Originally Posted By usmcmp:
Pick up the current entry level Cannon or Nikon system at Costco or wherever. And no you don't need a stamp.
This is actually terrible advice, especially for someone that's been into photography previously or has an interest in learning.

The entry level cameras often have features missing, disabled, or crippled in some way or buried in menus whereas the cameras higher up on the chain have convenient buttons and do more useful stuff.

My advice is to buy the best camera you can afford. A used one from a higher tier last generation model is better than a new lower tiered one at the same or reasonably close price point.

I can't speak to Canon specifically as I'm not much into those, but as a general rule, the advice above should hold true for most brands.
+1 on this.

I don't know Canon well enough to give advice on what to look at there, but the Nikon D7200 is a fantastic starter point if you can afford it. Basically all the buttons and settings that a professional camera has, but with the auto modes and whatnot of a beginner/advanced camera as well. All around a fantastic camera though.

The big thing to consider is that you aren't buying a camera body. You are buying into the lens system, as lenses last a whole lot longer than a camera body. Canon has changed lens mounts a few times, but Nikon hasn't. Pretty much any lens they've made since the late 70's can be used on their current cameras, including their new professional mirrorless (with adapter). Huge variety of lenses out there.

Just comes down to budget really. If you toss some ideas on that our way, I'm sure we can kick out a handful of ideas.
Link Posted: 11/2/2018 9:39:24 AM EST
I decided to teach myself photography last year and after a bunch of on-line research ended up with a Nikon D5600. Not as basic as the D3400 but not as advanced as the 7200 or 7500. I've found it quite easy to learn and am getting some nice photos. Sounds like your wife is more advanced than me so I agree with the above advice to go with something in the pro-sumer category. Don't know anything about Canon but I'm sure they have models in the same categories as Nikon. Got my stuff from B&H Photo, fyi. Good luck.
Link Posted: 11/4/2018 9:57:14 PM EST
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Originally Posted By NorthPolar:
+1 on this.

I don't know Canon well enough to give advice on what to look at there, but the Nikon D7200 is a fantastic starter point if you can afford it. Basically all the buttons and settings that a professional camera has, but with the auto modes and whatnot of a beginner/advanced camera as well. All around a fantastic camera though.

The big thing to consider is that you aren't buying a camera body. You are buying into the lens system, as lenses last a whole lot longer than a camera body. Canon has changed lens mounts a few times, but Nikon hasn't. Pretty much any lens they've made since the late 70's can be used on their current cameras, including their new professional mirrorless (with adapter). Huge variety of lenses out there.

Just comes down to budget really. If you toss some ideas on that our way, I'm sure we can kick out a handful of ideas.
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Originally Posted By NorthPolar:
Originally Posted By Zack3g:
Originally Posted By usmcmp:
Pick up the current entry level Cannon or Nikon system at Costco or wherever. And no you don't need a stamp.
This is actually terrible advice, especially for someone that's been into photography previously or has an interest in learning.

The entry level cameras often have features missing, disabled, or crippled in some way or buried in menus whereas the cameras higher up on the chain have convenient buttons and do more useful stuff.

My advice is to buy the best camera you can afford. A used one from a higher tier last generation model is better than a new lower tiered one at the same or reasonably close price point.

I can't speak to Canon specifically as I'm not much into those, but as a general rule, the advice above should hold true for most brands.
+1 on this.

I don't know Canon well enough to give advice on what to look at there, but the Nikon D7200 is a fantastic starter point if you can afford it. Basically all the buttons and settings that a professional camera has, but with the auto modes and whatnot of a beginner/advanced camera as well. All around a fantastic camera though.

The big thing to consider is that you aren't buying a camera body. You are buying into the lens system, as lenses last a whole lot longer than a camera body. Canon has changed lens mounts a few times, but Nikon hasn't. Pretty much any lens they've made since the late 70's can be used on their current cameras, including their new professional mirrorless (with adapter). Huge variety of lenses out there.

Just comes down to budget really. If you toss some ideas on that our way, I'm sure we can kick out a handful of ideas.
I believe Canon changed to the EF mount in 85 or 86. He could check her lenses to be sure that they will mount up.

If you want to stick with Canon, you can buy an 80D without breaking the bank and you'll get great performance and the features she'll most likely be looking for. A used 7D would be a bargain these days for the performance IMO, as are the 5D and 5dII if you're looking for a full frame camera. The 70D and 80D really shine when it comes to video.
Link Posted: 11/6/2018 1:19:53 PM EST
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Originally Posted By killingmachine123:

I believe Canon changed to the EF mount in 85 or 86. He could check her lenses to be sure that they will mount up.

If you want to stick with Canon, you can buy an 80D without breaking the bank and you'll get great performance and the features she'll most likely be looking for. A used 7D would be a bargain these days for the performance IMO, as are the 5D and 5dII if you're looking for a full frame camera. The 70D and 80D really shine when it comes to video.
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Her Canon fim cameras are from the late 90s/early 2000s so lenses should fit.

I know that from handling, she’s said she likes the rebel line but this has been from a fit and feel standpoint only; she’s not had the chance to use one.

It looks like the rebel line is aimed more toward entry level type users and she would probably be able to get more functionality out of something like the 80D... am I interpreting this correctly?
Link Posted: 11/6/2018 6:15:29 PM EST
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Originally Posted By pilotman:
Her Canon fim cameras are from the late 90s/early 2000s so lenses should fit.

I know that from handling, she's said she likes the rebel line but this has been from a fit and feel standpoint only; she's not had the chance to use one.

It looks like the rebel line is aimed more toward entry level type users and she would probably be able to get more functionality out of something like the 80D... am I interpreting this correctly?
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Originally Posted By pilotman:
Originally Posted By killingmachine123:

I believe Canon changed to the EF mount in 85 or 86. He could check her lenses to be sure that they will mount up.

If you want to stick with Canon, you can buy an 80D without breaking the bank and you'll get great performance and the features she'll most likely be looking for. A used 7D would be a bargain these days for the performance IMO, as are the 5D and 5dII if you're looking for a full frame camera. The 70D and 80D really shine when it comes to video.
Her Canon fim cameras are from the late 90s/early 2000s so lenses should fit.

I know that from handling, she's said she likes the rebel line but this has been from a fit and feel standpoint only; she's not had the chance to use one.

It looks like the rebel line is aimed more toward entry level type users and she would probably be able to get more functionality out of something like the 80D... am I interpreting this correctly?
I would definitely think the 80D would be for her, although Canon sometimes has 6D cameras in their refurb store for about the same price as a new 80D. In that case, I would personally go with the full frame camera. They are really nice in comparison. Unless she is going to be shooting a lot of sports, she won't see the down side of the slower FPS for burst mode.
Link Posted: 11/6/2018 8:39:22 PM EST
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Originally Posted By killingmachine123:

I would definitely think the 80D would be for her, although Canon sometimes has 6D cameras in their refurb store for about the same price as a new 80D. In that case, I would personally go with the full frame camera. They are really nice in comparison. Unless she is going to be shooting a lot of sports, she won't see the down side of the slower FPS for burst mode.
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Ahh I see... now I'm glad I asked, because I'm learning stuff now!

I'm guessing again, but given her level of experience, she will be more likely to benefit from a full frame model... is that a safe assumption?

I appreciate the input everyone!
Link Posted: 11/6/2018 8:49:08 PM EST
Link Posted: 11/6/2018 8:58:37 PM EST
I wouldn't buy one, tell her/gift certificate and let her pick it out. Camera to a photographer is like buying a gun to a hunter/competition shooter. Way too many variables.
Link Posted: 11/6/2018 9:02:00 PM EST
In the rebel line get the T6S. But I would suggest starting with the 77d.
Link Posted: 11/6/2018 9:48:01 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Zack3g:
Depends on the intended use.

Full frame favors stuff like portraits and landscapes. Crop bodies favor stuff like wildlife and macro.

You can do either with either, of course, but full frames are more sensitive to cropping.
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Originally Posted By Zack3g:
Originally Posted By pilotman:

Ahh I see... now I'm glad I asked, because I'm learning stuff now!

I'm guessing again, but given her level of experience, she will be more likely to benefit from a full frame model... is that a safe assumption?

I appreciate the input everyone!
Depends on the intended use.

Full frame favors stuff like portraits and landscapes. Crop bodies favor stuff like wildlife and macro.

You can do either with either, of course, but full frames are more sensitive to cropping.
That's a good way to sum it up. I use my 70D for football and some other sports, along with video. I use the 5D for landscapes and walking around artsy/portrait stuff. The body really affects which lens I have on the camera.
Link Posted: 11/7/2018 9:40:05 AM EST
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Originally Posted By pilotman:
Her Canon fim cameras are from the late 90s/early 2000s so lenses should fit.

I know that from handling, she’s said she likes the rebel line but this has been from a fit and feel standpoint only; she’s not had the chance to use one.

It looks like the rebel line is aimed more toward entry level type users and she would probably be able to get more functionality out of something like the 80D... am I interpreting this correctly?
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Originally Posted By pilotman:
Originally Posted By killingmachine123:

I believe Canon changed to the EF mount in 85 or 86. He could check her lenses to be sure that they will mount up.

If you want to stick with Canon, you can buy an 80D without breaking the bank and you'll get great performance and the features she'll most likely be looking for. A used 7D would be a bargain these days for the performance IMO, as are the 5D and 5dII if you're looking for a full frame camera. The 70D and 80D really shine when it comes to video.
Her Canon fim cameras are from the late 90s/early 2000s so lenses should fit.

I know that from handling, she’s said she likes the rebel line but this has been from a fit and feel standpoint only; she’s not had the chance to use one.

It looks like the rebel line is aimed more toward entry level type users and she would probably be able to get more functionality out of something like the 80D... am I interpreting this correctly?
Seems like her Canon lenses will be GTG, at least regarding the mount. I don't know what, if any, shenanigans Canon pulls with their lens drives and lower end bodies like Nikon. (for instance, Nikon 3xxx and maybe 5xxx bodies aren't compatible with the motor drives of their AF-D lenses)

Coming from film, I would look at the mid-range Canons, rather than the entry bodies. The mid-range bodies will be more button driven, rather than menu driven. In my opinion, this makes a camera far more usable, especially if coming from a film body. The image quality caoability of today's DLSRs will make the experience far more enjoyable than anything she ever did with film.

Maybe even look at picking up a re-furb or a higher end body. Personally, I have no reservations about picking up factory re-furbs or even used bodies. People are fickle, and often part with stuff for no reason at all. 50% savings with some minor cosmetic wear and 5% shutter wear - that's a deal.
Link Posted: 11/7/2018 9:44:16 AM EST
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Originally Posted By olivers_AR:
I wouldn't buy one, tell her/gift certificate and let her pick it out. Camera to a photographer is like buying a gun to a hunter/competition shooter. Way too many variables.
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This is another good thing to consider.

I'm spoiled by having a very good local camera store, and my daughter was able to swap out my purchase for the camera that fit her better, and at the same time, I was able to get a physical camera in her hands so she could compare and contrast the new mirrorless to my DSLRs. In the end, she, surprisingly, or maybe not surprisingly, went the DSLR route.
Link Posted: 11/7/2018 5:58:23 PM EST
(for instance, Nikon 3xxx and maybe 5xxx bodies aren't compatible with the motor drives of their AF-D lenses)
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It's more than a bit of a stretch to call that shenanigans; back in the day (before silent wave motors) they were ALL screw drive lenses. The D3xxx and D5xxx were developed well after that time, and if you're looking for ways to cut costs on a mid-range and budget consumer body, dropping the screw drive is a logical place. All my bodies have the screw drive, but I don't have any screw drive lenses.

Shenanigans would be if they crippled the D3xxx and D5xxx to not work with all AF-S lenses, or not work with the "gold ring" lenses.

Shenanigans is what Canon does, with changing mounts so that old lenses simply won't fit on newer bodies, regardless of AF. And yeah, I know Canon had their reasons, but Nikon has taken great pains over the years to ensure backwards compatibility. You may not get all the features, but your F-mount lens from 1959 will still mount of your D5 body.

The Nikon F-mount is one of only two SLR lens mounts (the other being the Pentax K-mount) which were not abandoned by their associated manufacturer upon the introduction of autofocus, but rather extended to meet new requirements related to metering, autofocus, and aperture control. The large variety of F-mount compatible lenses makes it the largest system of interchangeable flange-mount photographic lenses in history.
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