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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/24/2005 5:27:40 AM EDT
I have 25 gallons of kerosene I'd like to use up. Can I burn it in a diesel? (2005 GM Duramax.) I'd sure hate to f**k up a new truck.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 5:33:53 AM EDT
Can you? Yes. Should you, probably not. Not that it wouldnt burn it, but it doenst have the lubricity that diesel has.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 5:37:51 AM EDT
I've been told I can dump it in my furnace storage tank, which is #2 fuel oil. I've been told the latter is the same as diesel. Would kero be bad for the furnace, or would the fuel oil dilute it enough to provide lubricity?
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 5:40:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Rodent:
I've been told I can dump it in my furnace storage tank, which is #2 fuel oil. I've been told the latter is the same as diesel. Would kero be bad for the furnace, or would the fuel oil dilute it enough to provide lubricity?



Kerosene can be burnt in your furnace, no problem.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 5:41:13 AM EDT
I have used Kero in diesels in a pinch. Ran a dozer all summer using 1 quart of oil per 20 gallons of Kero without a problem.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 5:42:21 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/24/2005 6:05:59 AM EDT by captainpooby]
I'd do it but I'd throw it in a bit at a time on a 3/4 tank.


What is diesel fuel?

Diesel fuel is made from hydrocarbons that are derived from crude oil (petroleum) through the refining process. There are hundreds of hydrocarbons in petroleum. Hydrocarbons include any molecules that just contain hydrogen and carbon, both of which are fuel molecules that can be burnt (oxidized). Petroleum is refined to break apart the complex mixture of hydrocarbons into various products. To do so petroleum is separated into fractions whose distinguishing feature is their different boiling points. Typical refinery products include:

Product
Boiling Range oFahrenheit

Liquid Petroleum Gas (LPG) -40 -31
Gasoline 80 - 400
Kerosene, Jet Fuel & #1 Diesel Fuel 340 - 515
#2 Diesel Fuel & Furnace Oil 350 - 650
Lube Oils 650 - 1000
Residual Oil (Bunker C) 650 - 1200
Asphalt 1000+
Petroleum Coke Solid

Diesel fuel is heavier than gasoline and contains more Btu value:

Product Weight Per Gallon Btu Value
Gasoline 6.17 124,000 Btu/Gallon
#1 Diesel (Kerosene) 6.76 135,000 Btu/Gallon
#2 Diesel 7.05 140,000 Btu/Gallon

What fuel should I use in my diesel engine?

When choosing the right fuel for your diesel engine you should refer to your Operation Manual provided by the engine manufacturer. Generally speaking, engine manufacturers typically recommend No. 1 and No. 2 grade diesel fuel as described in ASTM D 975, which are sometimes referred to as "preferred fuels." These preferred fuels are distillate fuels and are commonly called diesel fuel, furnace fuel, gas oil and kerosene. Another class of fuels, sometimes referred to as "permissible fuels," include crude oils or blended fuels. Also, biodiesel (ASTM D 6751) has been approved for use in most diesel engines. Diesel engines will run better and have less maintenance problems if run on higher grade diesel fuel, however for economic considerations the end-user must weigh the higher cost of the fuel against the additional maintenance costs involved. For this reason most diesel engines are run on the lowest cost fuel available, which has been approved by the local, state and federal government agencies involved.

Engine manufacturers recommend fuel based on effect on performance, safety in storage and handling, maintenance considerations and possible harmful effects to the engine. Engine manufacturers "do not" guarantee fuel, nor do fuel dealers guarantee engines. It is up to the end-user to use the proper recommended fuel, which can vary greatly depending on geographical location and government regulations. If in doubt ask your fuel supplier for an analysis of the fuel you are buying or have one performed by a competent laboratory. Note: analysis can vary considerably from day to day as stored fuel tends to lose the lighter hydrocarbons, gain moisture and form algae as well as undergo many other changes caused by a variety of reasons mostly associated with atmospheric conditions. Typically, the following properties are tested to insure the quality of the fuel:





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