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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 11/20/2012 7:52:14 PM EST
Recent events (Sandy) have me thinking about a vehicle to get out of Dodge with. Right now, I have a big block chevy 4x4 dually painted flat black. I topped her off before the storm and didn't need to wait on any lines before the "shortage" ended but got me thinking about range. It'd go about 300 miles on a full tank of 87 octane. This would have been just enough to get out of Sandy's gas line radius. Should I leave it alone (I have 40 gallons packed away aside from in tank storage), add auxiliary capacity up to 1,000 miles on board or trade up to a truck that can get 500 out of the stock tank and upgrade to 1,500 onboard capacity (#2 Diesel)? I'm thinking it would be nice to be half of the way across the country before needing fuel but, the trucks that can do it seem a bit more fragile in the drivetrain department (Dodge 68RE or 48RE trans) and would cost me more than a years worth of food to upgrade to after selling the current truck.

What do you all think?
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 7:55:29 PM EST
A couple of good 5 Gal gas containers that you could store securely in the bed of your truck might be the easiest and cheapest solution to extend your range.

Link Posted: 11/20/2012 7:56:55 PM EST
... diesel is your friend
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 7:58:57 PM EST
the one that has a full tank and has the keys readily available
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 8:08:01 PM EST
Originally Posted By 74novaman:
A couple of good 5 Gal gas containers that you could store securely in the bed of your truck might be the easiest and cheapest solution to extend your range.



Yep, Like I said, I have 40 gallons hoarded. It is in easily transportable cans. That would easily double the range of my truck, but still only get me 100 miles more than an oil burner Cummins with a stock tank full. My big concern is the extra $ a Cummins would cost and the poor transmission it seems to be saddled with.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 8:11:29 PM EST
Originally Posted By Mossberg:
Originally Posted By 74novaman:
A couple of good 5 Gal gas containers that you could store securely in the bed of your truck might be the easiest and cheapest solution to extend your range.



Yep, Like I said, I have 40 gallons hoarded. It is in easily transportable cans. That would easily double the range of my truck, but still only get me 100 miles more than an oil burner Cummins with a stock tank full. My big concern is the extra $ a Cummins would cost and the poor transmission it seems to be saddled with.


Yep, I read that...and it is why I recommended you stick with what you've got. If you've got a perfectly good vehicle and a good way to solve the stated problem (lack of range) I see no reason to spend money trying to answer the question with a more expensive solution....unless you're just looking for a reason to buy a different truck.



Link Posted: 11/20/2012 8:19:42 PM EST
I would pick a ford escape 4x4
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 8:19:56 PM EST
Originally Posted By 74novaman:
Originally Posted By Mossberg:
Originally Posted By 74novaman:
A couple of good 5 Gal gas containers that you could store securely in the bed of your truck might be the easiest and cheapest solution to extend your range.



Yep, Like I said, I have 40 gallons hoarded. It is in easily transportable cans. That would easily double the range of my truck, but still only get me 100 miles more than an oil burner Cummins with a stock tank full. My big concern is the extra $ a Cummins would cost and the poor transmission it seems to be saddled with.


Yep, I read that...and it is why I recommended you stick with what you've got. If you've got a perfectly good vehicle and a good way to solve the stated problem (lack of range) I see no reason to spend money trying to answer the question with a more expensive solution....unless you're just looking for a reason to buy a different truck.





I'm looking for validation NOT to buy a new truck, lol. Really, I'm wondering what range is worth, since I could go further trading up to the oil burner given the same volume of fuel stored. Is it worth more money? Is it worth less reliability?
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 8:23:06 PM EST
Ecoboost F150 with the 36 gallon fuel tank.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 8:27:52 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/20/2012 8:28:21 PM EST by 74novaman]
Originally Posted By Mossberg:
Really, I'm wondering what range is worth, since I could go further trading up to the oil burner given the same volume of fuel stored. Is it worth more money? Is it worth less reliability?


I promise I'm not trying to be difficult, though it may come across that way.

What range is worth to you really depends on where you're trying to go.

For me, all I really need is the ability to travel ~500 miles back to my parents farm. Outside of that, I don't have to worry too much about getting anywhere, major disaster or otherwise.

Figure out where the farthest place you would need to get to is, and then start considering your options. I feel like you're trying to find an answer but you're not quite asking the right questions yet, if that makes any sense at all.

Just trying to help you answer what's best for your situation....hope I'm not coming across negatively. Tone is hard to convey well on the internet.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 8:36:39 PM EST
Originally Posted By Merrell:
Ecoboost F150 with the 36 gallon fuel tank.


Forgot to mention it needs to be able to pull 18,000 lbs on a daily basis to earn its keep.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 8:38:33 PM EST
Originally Posted By 74novaman:
Originally Posted By Mossberg:
Really, I'm wondering what range is worth, since I could go further trading up to the oil burner given the same volume of fuel stored. Is it worth more money? Is it worth less reliability?


I promise I'm not trying to be difficult, though it may come across that way.

What range is worth to you really depends on where you're trying to go.

For me, all I really need is the ability to travel ~500 miles back to my parents farm. Outside of that, I don't have to worry too much about getting anywhere, major disaster or otherwise.

Figure out where the farthest place you would need to get to is, and then start considering your options. I feel like you're trying to find an answer but you're not quite asking the right questions yet, if that makes any sense at all.

Just trying to help you answer what's best for your situation....hope I'm not coming across negatively. Tone is hard to convey well on the internet.


Good call, I see where you are coming from. I need a final bugout location. I was thinking Mexico...
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 8:40:32 PM EST
Ford excursion powered by a 12v cummins backed up by an Allison transmission with a standalone TCM,putting power to the ground via narrowed unimog portal axles…one can dream
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 8:41:07 PM EST
Originally Posted By Mossberg:
Originally Posted By Merrell:
Ecoboost F150 with the 36 gallon fuel tank.


Forgot to mention it needs to be able to pull 18,000 lbs on a daily basis to earn its keep.


Two Ecoboost F150 with the 36 gallon fuel tanks.

Lash em together and drive em from a buckboard.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 8:42:08 PM EST
Originally Posted By Mossberg:
Originally Posted By 74novaman:
A couple of good 5 Gal gas containers that you could store securely in the bed of your truck might be the easiest and cheapest solution to extend your range.



Yep, Like I said, I have 40 gallons hoarded. It is in easily transportable cans. That would easily double the range of my truck, but still only get me 100 miles more than an oil burner Cummins with a stock tank full. My big concern is the extra $ a Cummins would cost and the poor transmission it seems to be saddled with.



Are you referring to the NV4500 when you say poor transmission?
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 8:44:51 PM EST
Originally Posted By GrasshopperNOmore:
Originally Posted By Mossberg:
Originally Posted By 74novaman:
A couple of good 5 Gal gas containers that you could store securely in the bed of your truck might be the easiest and cheapest solution to extend your range.



Yep, Like I said, I have 40 gallons hoarded. It is in easily transportable cans. That would easily double the range of my truck, but still only get me 100 miles more than an oil burner Cummins with a stock tank full. My big concern is the extra $ a Cummins would cost and the poor transmission it seems to be saddled with.



Are you referring to the NV4500 when you say poor transmission?


I was thinking 68RE/48RE in reference to that comment..
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 8:46:54 PM EST
My M1031 fits a 55 gallon drum easily up front where I can tap it to refill the fuel tank. All protected under lock and key, out of sight and mind. It gets 17 miles per gallon, toting its 12 kW PTO generator and air compressor.

It is the ultimate BOV with the power generation capacity. Yes, the generator can be connected to provide 120/240 household voltage. At 12 kW, it could power any residential home and some small McMansions.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 8:53:06 PM EST
Originally Posted By Keith_J:
My M1031 fits a 55 gallon drum easily up front where I can tap it to refill the fuel tank. All protected under lock and key, out of sight and mind. It gets 17 miles per gallon, toting its 12 kW PTO generator and air compressor.

It is the ultimate BOV with the power generation capacity. Yes, the generator can be connected to provide 120/240 household voltage. At 12 kW, it could power any residential home and some small McMansions.


Lol, sadly, a CUCV can't pull 18,000 lbs or keep up with normal highway traffic.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 8:58:01 PM EST

Originally Posted By Mossberg:
Originally Posted By Keith_J:
My M1031 fits a 55 gallon drum easily up front where I can tap it to refill the fuel tank. All protected under lock and key, out of sight and mind. It gets 17 miles per gallon, toting its 12 kW PTO generator and air compressor.

It is the ultimate BOV with the power generation capacity. Yes, the generator can be connected to provide 120/240 household voltage. At 12 kW, it could power any residential home and some small McMansions.


Lol, sadly, a CUCV can't pull 18,000 lbs or keep up with normal highway traffic.

It could. I've got a 6.5 turbo HMMWV engine in the works and if coupled with a 4L80, it should be adequate. Unless in the mountains...since you are in the East, not an issue.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 9:03:55 PM EST
Given your stated objectives I'd recommend the Diesel PU that you like and install an L tank and pump setup like heavy equipment contractors use. In a TEOTWAWKI situation no one will care about putting off road diesel in the truck, diesel will store longer, and all things being equal will give you better MPG.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 9:07:10 PM EST
Originally Posted By Keith_J:

Originally Posted By Mossberg:
Originally Posted By Keith_J:
My M1031 fits a 55 gallon drum easily up front where I can tap it to refill the fuel tank. All protected under lock and key, out of sight and mind. It gets 17 miles per gallon, toting its 12 kW PTO generator and air compressor.

It is the ultimate BOV with the power generation capacity. Yes, the generator can be connected to provide 120/240 household voltage. At 12 kW, it could power any residential home and some small McMansions.


Lol, sadly, a CUCV can't pull 18,000 lbs or keep up with normal highway traffic.

It could. I've got a 6.5 turbo HMMWV engine in the works and if coupled with a 4L80, it should be adequate. Unless in the mountains...since you are in the East, not an issue.


GM 6.5 Turbo is not a reliable engine IMO.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 9:09:36 PM EST
Originally Posted By Mossberg:
Recent events (Sandy) have me thinking about a vehicle to get out of Dodge with. Right now, I have a big block chevy 4x4 dually painted flat black. I topped her off before the storm and didn't need to wait on any lines before the "shortage" ended but got me thinking about range. It'd go about 300 miles on a full tank of 87 octane. This would have been just enough to get out of Sandy's gas line radius. Should I leave it alone (I have 40 gallons packed away aside from in tank storage), add auxiliary capacity up to 1,000 miles on board or trade up to a truck that can get 500 out of the stock tank and upgrade to 1,500 onboard capacity (#2 Diesel)? I'm thinking it would be nice to be half of the way across the country before needing fuel but, the trucks that can do it seem a bit more fragile in the drivetrain department (Dodge 68RE or 48RE trans) and would cost me more than a years worth of food to upgrade to after selling the current truck.

What do you all think?


If you want to stick to as minimal investment as possible just go to tractor supply *or whatever farm supply you have in Yankee land* and pick up a Toolbox/fuel tank combo and bolt it to the bed of the truck. That will give you 30 or more gallons.

Or you can see what aftermarket fuel tank options you have that will replace your factory tank with a larger tank.

Short of hauling around a bunch of jerry cans of fuel the above is your cheapest options.


Link Posted: 11/20/2012 9:13:08 PM EST
Originally Posted By Mossberg:
Originally Posted By Keith_J:

Originally Posted By Mossberg:
Originally Posted By Keith_J:
My M1031 fits a 55 gallon drum easily up front where I can tap it to refill the fuel tank. All protected under lock and key, out of sight and mind. It gets 17 miles per gallon, toting its 12 kW PTO generator and air compressor.

It is the ultimate BOV with the power generation capacity. Yes, the generator can be connected to provide 120/240 household voltage. At 12 kW, it could power any residential home and some small McMansions.


Lol, sadly, a CUCV can't pull 18,000 lbs or keep up with normal highway traffic.

It could. I've got a 6.5 turbo HMMWV engine in the works and if coupled with a 4L80, it should be adequate. Unless in the mountains...since you are in the East, not an issue.


GM 6.5 Turbo is not a reliable engine IMO.


+1 they work for the Army but our maintenance bay in the rear always had atleast one vehicle getting a engine pulled and replaced for throwing a rod or something. If you dont have the logistics train to support it buy a more reliable vehicle.

I have a M1009 CUCV as a toy/ backupBOV but I dont really trust it all that much
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 9:14:11 PM EST
Originally Posted By Mossberg:
Originally Posted By Keith_J:

Originally Posted By Mossberg:
Originally Posted By Keith_J:
My M1031 fits a 55 gallon drum easily up front where I can tap it to refill the fuel tank. All protected under lock and key, out of sight and mind. It gets 17 miles per gallon, toting its 12 kW PTO generator and air compressor.

It is the ultimate BOV with the power generation capacity. Yes, the generator can be connected to provide 120/240 household voltage. At 12 kW, it could power any residential home and some small McMansions.


Lol, sadly, a CUCV can't pull 18,000 lbs or keep up with normal highway traffic.

It could. I've got a 6.5 turbo HMMWV engine in the works and if coupled with a 4L80, it should be adequate. Unless in the mountains...since you are in the East, not an issue.


GM 6.5 Turbo is not a reliable engine IMO.


Don't know about the turbo, but we do have a lot of N/A 6.5 in the fleet and they are constantly crapping out, we get ones that blow a head gasket every few months, the motors use tubes of silicone to seal the valve covers and oil pan,they chew up main seals like you wouldn't believe, injection pumps that magically come out of timing and glow plugs that barely get hot enough to start it in 30 degree weather
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 9:14:45 PM EST
Originally Posted By Mossberg:
Forgot to mention it needs to be able to pull 18,000 lbs on a daily basis to earn its keep.


I was going to say to keep the truck you've got. But with that kind of work you should be running a diesel already.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 9:17:03 PM EST
Originally Posted By dillweed:
Given your stated objectives I'd recommend the Diesel PU that you like and install an L tank and pump setup like heavy equipment contractors use. In a TEOTWAWKI situation no one will care about putting off road diesel in the truck, diesel will store longer, and all things being equal will give you better MPG.


This is what I am getting at. In the real world, I get 8 MPG pulling with my BBC truck. I have tried the big three Diesels and Cummins is the only one with a substantial economy benifit, about 13 MPG pulling the same load. It will run on HHO or perhaps jet A in addition to #2 Diesel without any major mods. I know it would be better to bugout with (as long as the trans doesn't soil itself) but, is that worth the extra $ and possible transmission reliability deficit?

The truck has to earn its keep every day pulling weight, not just sit waiting for doomsday.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 9:25:14 PM EST
Originally Posted By Boomer:
Originally Posted By Mossberg:
Forgot to mention it needs to be able to pull 18,000 lbs on a daily basis to earn its keep.


I was going to say to keep the truck you've got. But with that kind of work you should be running a diesel already.


The 454 has been doing it since 1997 with only minor parts replacement (water pump, fuel pump, exhaust parts)?
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 9:33:24 PM EST
Just in case of an emp








Link Posted: 11/20/2012 9:36:21 PM EST
I like how quickly Keith bowed out.

Those that know....
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 9:38:18 PM EST
If your current truck is paid for, I'd keep the truck and look at aux tank options.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 9:57:39 PM EST
Originally Posted By Saber7:
If you want to stick to as minimal investment as possible just go to tractor supply *or whatever farm supply you have in Yankee land* and pick up a Toolbox/fuel tank combo and bolt it to the bed of the truck. That will give you 30 or more gallons.


Also, in a pinch, having that 30 extra gallons of fresh gasoline on hand might come in handy for other uses. For example, it would run your average portable generator or trash pump for quite a while, or could be used to fill up another bug-out vehicle.

Link Posted: 11/21/2012 3:11:20 AM EST
If you can swing the size and the discomfort - An M35A2 multifuel is an awsome choice. I have three such trucks. Use them all the time for fun and work.

Why?

1. Runs on anything that is liquid and burns within reason.
2. Can go on or off road - Think about how much literal gridlock in a real scenario - cars jammed on the highway and your trapped. I literally could turn off just about any road and continue off road on just about any terrain - through brush and small trees, It can push cars out of the way, I have done this with my beater truck at the metal scrap yard when dropping off scrap - literall plows cars out of the way and only scratches paint!
3. Lots of carrying capacity - can carry families and supplies.
4. Can ford water well, can even go underwater with a snorkel and fording kit.
5. Can be had cheaper than a pick up truck

The government designed these for all sorts of emergencies. and they are proven.

The biggest detriment is they are not comfortable nor as easy to drive as others, but are incredibly useful and durable.
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 3:12:34 AM EST
one word

schwinn
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 5:25:17 AM EST
Originally Posted By Saber7:
Originally Posted By Mossberg:
GM 6.5 Turbo is not a reliable engine IMO.


+1 they work for the Army but our maintenance bay in the rear always had atleast one vehicle getting a engine pulled and replaced for throwing a rod or something. If you dont have the logistics train to support it buy a more reliable vehicle.

I have a M1009 CUCV as a toy/ backupBOV but I dont really trust it all that much


Do the military 6.5s have the updated blocks?
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 6:24:33 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/21/2012 6:27:41 AM EST by ChrisNCT]
I would love to have a Unimog for a bugout vehicle!

Dull black primer, Some security features, solid rubber tires, equipment racks, gun racks, ammo storage, supplies storage, good lighting, IR floodlights and night vision..... sorry getting carried away. Too easily excited.




Link Posted: 11/21/2012 6:24:41 AM EST

Originally Posted By cherenkov:
If you can swing the size and the discomfort - An M35A2 multifuel is an awsome choice. I have three such trucks. Use them all the time for fun and work.

Why?

1. Runs on anything that is liquid and burns within reason.
2. Can go on or off road - Think about how much literal gridlock in a real scenario - cars jammed on the highway and your trapped. I literally could turn off just about any road and continue off road on just about any terrain - through brush and small trees, It can push cars out of the way, I have done this with my beater truck at the metal scrap yard when dropping off scrap - literall plows cars out of the way and only scratches paint!
3. Lots of carrying capacity - can carry families and supplies.
4. Can ford water well, can even go underwater with a snorkel and fording kit.
5. Can be had cheaper than a pick up truck

The government designed these for all sorts of emergencies. and they are proven.

The biggest detriment is they are not comfortable nor as easy to drive as others, but are incredibly useful and durable.

Not nearly as reliable as the 6.2/6.5 Detroit Diesels in GM products. Parts are harder to find. Most have single circuit brakes. While they haul 2-1/2 times as much as the M1008 series, they also drink more than twice the diesel. Sure, you can run gasoline in most but many have the fuel density compensator bypassed.

Fording is over-rated. It is an hour procedure to prepare to ford, then two days to service it after.

The days of cheap M35A2s are OVER. Expect to enter the market at 3 large for running condition with poor paint and bald tires.
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 6:27:52 AM EST

Originally Posted By the_great_mantis:
Originally Posted By Saber7:
Originally Posted By Mossberg:
GM 6.5 Turbo is not a reliable engine IMO.


+1 they work for the Army but our maintenance bay in the rear always had atleast one vehicle getting a engine pulled and replaced for throwing a rod or something. If you dont have the logistics train to support it buy a more reliable vehicle.

I have a M1009 CUCV as a toy/ backupBOV but I dont really trust it all that much


Do the military 6.5s have the updated blocks?

Yes, they are but all can benefit from a lower end girdle and harmonic damper swap every 5 years. The damper is the key to engine longevity since these are high compression engines. The rubber ring hardens and then the unit functions as a flywheel, incapable of damping torsional vibrations. Gasoline engines can get away with hardened harmonic dampers, diesel engines die from it.
Link Posted: 11/21/2012 2:50:37 PM EST
Originally Posted By Saber7:
Originally Posted By Mossberg:
Originally Posted By Keith_J:

Originally Posted By Mossberg:
Originally Posted By Keith_J:
My M1031 fits a 55 gallon drum easily up front where I can tap it to refill the fuel tank. All protected under lock and key, out of sight and mind. It gets 17 miles per gallon, toting its 12 kW PTO generator and air compressor.

It is the ultimate BOV with the power generation capacity. Yes, the generator can be connected to provide 120/240 household voltage. At 12 kW, it could power any residential home and some small McMansions.


Lol, sadly, a CUCV can't pull 18,000 lbs or keep up with normal highway traffic.

It could. I've got a 6.5 turbo HMMWV engine in the works and if coupled with a 4L80, it should be adequate. Unless in the mountains...since you are in the East, not an issue.


GM 6.5 Turbo is not a reliable engine IMO.


+1 they work for the Army but our maintenance bay in the rear always had atleast one vehicle getting a engine pulled and replaced for throwing a rod or something. If you dont have the logistics train to support it buy a more reliable vehicle.

I have a M1009 CUCV as a toy/ backupBOV but I dont really trust it all that much


My M1009 has been very dependable. I made a 1300 mile round trip with it to Montana, a couple trips to Casper and Laramie. Just recently drove it down to Denver to pick up a very nice M416 trailer. I've racked up about 5000 trouble free miles since I bought it in May. I've done some work to it, replaced the harmonic balancer, replaced the starter relay, installed a frame mounted electric fuel pump, eliminating the miserable block mounted mechanical pump. The truck is basically my daily driver. It does have an oil leak I need to fix, probably the rear main seal but I probably drive it more than my 07 Hummer H3.







Link Posted: 11/21/2012 2:51:59 PM EST
Anything more than a motorcycle is wasted.

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