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Posted: 3/12/2005 7:40:02 PM EDT
www.worldpress.org/feed.cfm?http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml;sessionid=1GRMWLJ3YQDTDQFIQMFCM5OAVCBQYJVC?xml=/news/2005/03/13/ncrime13.xml&sSheet=/portal/2005/03/13/ixportaltop.html

Police chief: we cannot cope with violent crime
By Daniel Foggo and Carl Fellstrom
(Filed: 13/03/2005)

One of Britain's most senior police officers has admitted that his force is being overwhelmed by violent crime and cannot cope.

Steve Green, the Chief Constable of Nottinghamshire, said that among the principal causes of the crisis were Government reforms that compelled him to use officers for clerical tasks instead of front-line duties.

Steve Green: 'We are in a crisis situation'
The situation was so bad that he was preparing to "farm out" murder investigations to other police forces because his own detectives did not have time to tackle them.

Nottingham has been one of the worst affected areas for gun crime, which hit record levels across England and Wales last year.

Mr Green said ministers had a "fixation" with keeping officer numbers up - but had, in fact, been responsible for policies that had taken police away from front-line duties to do jobs that should be carried out by civilian staff, such as writing Home Office reports.

"We are reeling with the murders," he said. "We are in a long-standing crisis situation with major crime and it won't go away overnight.

"Having police doing back-office jobs is one of the factors [hampering us]. I want to increase the number of operational cops by reducing the numbers doing back-office jobs. It's frustrating to know that I could make better use of the money I've got, but I'm constrained from doing it because officer numbers is a political football. All the parties have the same fixation."

Mr Green said he was prevented from putting more police into front-line duties because if he reduced the number of officers doing clerical work he would lose a large amount of his funding from the Crime Fighting Fund, a Labour measure that gives extra money to forces that keep officer numbers high.

"Our accountant has said that if there was a way out of it, he would tell me," he said.

Mr Green, whose comments will increase pressure on the Government over its law-and-order policies, said his force was heavily in debt. He regularly had to borrow detectives from other constabularies to tackle a spate of largely drugs-related murders.

"We are now routinely going out to 'foreign' forces to get additional officers." One option they were on the verge of adopting was to farm an entire murder inquiry to another force. "I'm not aware of any other force ever having done such a thing," he said.

Nottingham's crisis has been prompted by a sharp rise in the number of murders and other violent crimes.

Since 2001, the force has had to investigate 21 Category A murders - those classed as being high-profile with no immediate suspect. Before 2000, it was dealing with one Category A murder every 12 to 18 months on average. Its officers are currently running 30 murder investigations.

Nottinghamshire residents are also three times more likely than the national average to have their car broken into, four times as likely to be burgled, almost five times as likely to be robbed, and twice as likely to suffer sexual attack. Nottinghamshire was also among the bottom four of under-performing forces in official figures last year.

Mr Green's decision to speak out follows another fatal shooting last week. Paul Thomas, 34, had left a pub in Radford, Nottingham, when he was gunned down just after 4.30pm on Thursday.

Firearms offences in England and Wales rose to a high of 24,094 last year with levels in Nottingham the fifth highest per head of population after London, Manchester, Liverpool and the West Midlands.

The Association of Chief Police Officers said other forces were experiencing similar pressures to Nottinghamshire because of the need for officers to carry out bureaucratic tasks that should be done by civilians.

"We've been raising it with the Government for some months," said a spokesman. "There is a fixation with police numbers, and an inflexibility over budgets, which is not producing effective policing. We can recruit officers, but not necessarily civilian staff."

David Davis, the shadow Home Secretary, said Mr Green's predicament was an example of the Government's ring-fencing of money, together with forces being swamped with bureaucracy.

He said: "We will do away with the national policing plan that creates these tar-gets so those police they have can be properly used."

Link Posted: 3/12/2005 7:42:55 PM EDT
Copied to make more readable. Long URLs screw up the paragraphs.

Police chief: we cannot cope with violent crime
By Daniel Foggo and Carl Fellstrom
(Filed: 13/03/2005)

One of Britain's most senior police officers has admitted that his force is being overwhelmed by violent crime and cannot cope.

Steve Green, the Chief Constable of Nottinghamshire, said that among the principal causes of the crisis were Government reforms that compelled him to use officers for clerical tasks instead of front-line duties.

Steve Green: 'We are in a crisis situation'
The situation was so bad that he was preparing to "farm out" murder investigations to other police forces because his own detectives did not have time to tackle them.

Nottingham has been one of the worst affected areas for gun crime, which hit record levels across England and Wales last year.

Mr Green said ministers had a "fixation" with keeping officer numbers up - but had, in fact, been responsible for policies that had taken police away from front-line duties to do jobs that should be carried out by civilian staff, such as writing Home Office reports.

"We are reeling with the murders," he said. "We are in a long-standing crisis situation with major crime and it won't go away overnight.

"Having police doing back-office jobs is one of the factors [hampering us]. I want to increase the number of operational cops by reducing the numbers doing back-office jobs. It's frustrating to know that I could make better use of the money I've got, but I'm constrained from doing it because officer numbers is a political football. All the parties have the same fixation."

Mr Green said he was prevented from putting more police into front-line duties because if he reduced the number of officers doing clerical work he would lose a large amount of his funding from the Crime Fighting Fund, a Labour measure that gives extra money to forces that keep officer numbers high.

"Our accountant has said that if there was a way out of it, he would tell me," he said.

Mr Green, whose comments will increase pressure on the Government over its law-and-order policies, said his force was heavily in debt. He regularly had to borrow detectives from other constabularies to tackle a spate of largely drugs-related murders.

"We are now routinely going out to 'foreign' forces to get additional officers." One option they were on the verge of adopting was to farm an entire murder inquiry to another force. "I'm not aware of any other force ever having done such a thing," he said.

Nottingham's crisis has been prompted by a sharp rise in the number of murders and other violent crimes.

Since 2001, the force has had to investigate 21 Category A murders - those classed as being high-profile with no immediate suspect. Before 2000, it was dealing with one Category A murder every 12 to 18 months on average. Its officers are currently running 30 murder investigations.

Nottinghamshire residents are also three times more likely than the national average to have their car broken into, four times as likely to be burgled, almost five times as likely to be robbed, and twice as likely to suffer sexual attack. Nottinghamshire was also among the bottom four of under-performing forces in official figures last year.

Mr Green's decision to speak out follows another fatal shooting last week. Paul Thomas, 34, had left a pub in Radford, Nottingham, when he was gunned down just after 4.30pm on Thursday.

Firearms offences in England and Wales rose to a high of 24,094 last year with levels in Nottingham the fifth highest per head of population after London, Manchester, Liverpool and the West Midlands.

The Association of Chief Police Officers said other forces were experiencing similar pressures to Nottinghamshire because of the need for officers to carry out bureaucratic tasks that should be done by civilians.

"We've been raising it with the Government for some months," said a spokesman. "There is a fixation with police numbers, and an inflexibility over budgets, which is not producing effective policing. We can recruit officers, but not necessarily civilian staff."

David Davis, the shadow Home Secretary, said Mr Green's predicament was an example of the Government's ring-fencing of money, together with forces being swamped with bureaucracy.

He said: "We will do away with the national policing plan that creates these tar-gets so those police they have can be properly used."

Link Posted: 3/12/2005 7:44:18 PM EDT

Someone should inform Rebecca Peters of this.

I bet you won't find this information on any of the American news shows.

I hope the NRA promotes more of these findings!
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 8:49:07 PM EDT
How can gun crime be up in the UK..........I thought guns were banned years ago......
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 8:51:38 PM EDT
Here is a hint..... Legalise pistols and CCW. Crime will drop, as most criminals will be shot dead in the commision of the crime
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 8:57:05 PM EDT
i think it would be interesting to see out of those gun crimes how many were committed by immigrants.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 8:57:39 PM EDT
Me personally I say give every law abiding citizen a gernade launcher and a good number of gernades and watch the criminal body parts fly. (yea, I am not right)
but since that will never happen (would love to see it happen though) I would say this.

Legalize firearms, Issue CCW's and offer classes for tactical firearm combat.

Watch crime drop in the first year.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:00:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CFII:
Here is a hint..... Legalise pistols and CCW. Crime will drop, as most criminals will be shot dead in the commision of the crime



Works in places in the US. Not being DRT during a crime is usually a good incentive to not try it.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:06:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TheSelecter:
i think it would be interesting to see out of those gun crimes how many were committed by immigrants.



You know I actually am curious as well; the Western European states have seen a lot more immigration from further East in the past 20 years than they probably have in the previous 50 or 75?
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