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Posted: 4/15/2006 4:23:42 AM EDT
My thirty year old GF/common law and i just had a whirlwind experience that ended yesterday on a very positive note.   I was just looking for some advice from you gals who might have experience picking up a rifle for the forst time after a Mastectomy.  It was partial, healing well and it is her right side/she shoots righty.  It will have been about a month by then.  Will she be alright with a rifle length lightweight or should i just grab a .22 upper so she can have some fun without worry about hurting anything. ...........................How do i get a pink ribbon up??  I want to take her to the RI rattle battle on the 22nd

Thanks to all who respond or read.  IM, email, post wif you have any advice or input.

LOBSTA
lobsterman
kyle778@juno.com

Link Posted: 4/15/2006 6:19:47 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 6:27:24 AM EDT
M4Madness and Pathfinder74 started the pink ribbons.  I'll see where they put them.

I would be very careful with the recoil afterwards.  I didn't have a Mastectomy, just a needle biopsy so mine wasnt as extensive.

I would suggest bringing out the hand guns for a while and to have her talk with her doctor.

Patty
PS Its awesome she has you for support!
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 7:03:26 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SP1Grrl:
I have no advice for her, I just wanted to say that I'm glad she's doing well.  Tell her to stay strong.



Same here. I've had non-cancerous masses removed (as a precaution) after a needle biopsy, but it was years later before I picked up a gun. I would strongly suggest speaking to her surgeon regarding the safety issue as every woman heals differently.

Link Posted: 4/15/2006 7:24:33 AM EDT
Did she have a lymph node biopsy too? Aside from the excisional surgery the SNB (sentinel node biopsy) can leave you feeling pretty sore and swollen and any bumps or sudden jolts can be quite painful ... if it were me, I'd avoid shooting rifles at this point, it's still very early days as far as the healing process goes. She should definitely consult her surgeon.

I hope everything goes well for her, I'll keep you both in my prayers.

Link Posted: 4/15/2006 7:41:19 AM EDT
Thank you all for the kind words and advice.  Seems that we wil take it very slow and talk to her surgeon.  Thanks all.
kyle and katie
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 11:48:04 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/15/2006 1:21:49 PM EDT by M4Madness]
My wife had breast cancer as well, but didn't require a mastectomy. I cannot comment on any complications that shooting a rifle may create due to the loss of the breast (soreness, etc.), but if she also had lymph nodes removed, lymphedema may be a concern. Lymphedema is a condition in which excess fluid collects in tissue and causes swelling. It may occur in the arm or leg after lymph vessels or lymph nodes in the underarm or groin are removed or treated with radiation. My wife is not supposed to wear tight, restrictive clothing or induce any shock on the side from which she had lymph nodes removed. She shoots a .410 shotgun while deer hunting with no problems, so I'd assume that a .223 wouldn't be much of an issue either.

As for adding a pink ribbon for an avatar:

1. Right click on the one below and save it to your hard drive.
2. Click on the "Photo" button at the very top of this forum.
3. Then click on the "Avatar/SigPic" button.
4. Locate the photo on your hard drive and upload it as your new avatar.

Hope everything works out fine for your girlfriend.

Link Posted: 4/15/2006 1:07:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SP1Grrl:
I have no advice for her, I just wanted to say that I'm glad she's doing well.  Tell her to stay strong.



A big +1.

I can relate a tiny bit...had a few close calls and a needle aspiration, but so far so good.
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 1:23:58 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 3:29:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
Partial mastectomy?

HOW partial?

How much is left?


Pardon me, but I'm curious about what "partial" means.    I understand needle biopsies, lumpectomies,
and radical mastectomies, but partial has always been a grey area.

I totally disagree with the "take it all"approach.  I think it's often done unnecessarily.  

I'm sure that if cancer of the male sex organ were as common as breast cancer,  total removal would be a VERY rare procedure.     Great research investments would be made to ensure that the treatment left as much of the equipment in place and in good working order as is possible.

Quite frankly,  I think women are getting maimed and mutilated by doctors who remove more than
they have to and don't take the time to be more precise and thorough.

CJ



Most likely its more fear on the part of the woman.  If I ever get DXed with breast cancer again I'll have them both cut off.  As much as I enjoy holding men's attention with them, its not worth it in the end.

Patty
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 3:41:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pattymcn:
As much as I enjoy holding men's attention with them, its not worth it in the end.



Honest, Patty, I wasn't talking to your breasts.
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 4:10:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By M4Madness:

Originally Posted By pattymcn:
As much as I enjoy holding men's attention with them, its not worth it in the end.



Honest, Patty, I wasn't talking to your breasts.



Link Posted: 4/15/2006 4:14:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
Partial mastectomy?

HOW partial?

How much is left?


Pardon me, but I'm curious about what "partial" means.    I understand needle biopsies, lumpectomies,
and radical mastectomies, but partial has always been a grey area.

I totally disagree with the "take it all"approach.  I think it's often done unnecessarily.  

I'm sure that if cancer of the male sex organ were as common as breast cancer,  total removal would be a VERY rare procedure.     Great research investments would be made to ensure that the treatment left as much of the equipment in place and in good working order as is possible.

Quite frankly,  I think women are getting maimed and mutilated by doctors who remove more than
they have to and don't take the time to be more precise and thorough.

CJ



They took a lot out but did a great job.  She is happy with the results and at 30yo it is a bit of a shock.  He paid close attention to that fact,  but they took a large mass, over around 20 mm and all surrounding tissue but they were by no means reckless and we were both all for it.  I don't know anythign about that stuff so we took thier advice.  Even though we live in Libtard central we have some of the best health care in the world and i believe we got it.  I don't usulally trust Dr's but this guy got my trust..  gotta go and relax and spend some time with my new hero.  
A partial can be small  but this was not a lumpectomy it was a fairly substantial surgery.  He said that her breasts were hard to see on the ultarasound cause they were dense but me and Katie asked him to use the term perky...   Thakns for all your concern everyone and feel free to ask any quetion...i'll put you in touch with Katie.

Thanks All
This is why this site is worth it
kyle
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 5:30:12 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 7:50:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/15/2006 8:44:17 PM EDT by 308Sako]
Kyle,  Stand by her and wish her well.
She needs you now more than ever.  

Do NOT be afraid to question your Doctors, and learn as much as you can about her specific type of cancer.  Learn what should be expected over time, and be vigilent as hell.  

Personally I think that making a life and death decision based upon "appearance or nerve pathway sensitivity" is one of the more assinine things I have heard. Just my opinion...

Happily my wife is a cancer survivor.  I am tempted to say far worse than most of what is being discussed here, but no cancer is acceptable.  Like a little pregnant. Regardless, every day is a special event, and she has more courage than anyone I have ever known.  Proud of her, and of what is good with the medical community.
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 7:22:21 AM EDT
While I agree that aesthetics are not a sensible consideration to base life and death decisions on, according to new research, doctors are finding that they can get clear margins by taking narrower incisions at the site of the primary tumor than in the past. I think it depends very strongly on each case (i.e. size, location and type of tumor) as everyone is different. I wouldn't (didn't) hesitate to have disfiguring surgery if it meant saving my life and I think the majority of people feel that way. Lymphatic mapping and SNB has also increased life expectancy for cancer patients who would, in the past, have had to wait and see if any nodes became swollen before having them biopsied...

I also think that cancer is relative to the individual. No matter what kind you have, it's just as terrifying and emotionally paralysing as any other. You are forced to face your own mortality. Cancer sucks. 'Nuff said.

This is where I'm coming from; I have melanoma. According to statistics, I have a 63-70% chance of surviving 5 years, although recent studies have shown an added 5-10% on these figures and my Oncologist thinks that my prognosis is even better. The ten year survival rate is 57%-63%. I'm currently at stage IIIa (16 months NED - YESS!), which means that there was local, microscopic lymph node involvement (speaking of disfiguring surgery, I had groin node dissection with resultant mild lymphedema and have FUGLY scars from hip to knee).

The problem is, if it spreads and I go to stage IV, there is no 'cure', there are very limited effective treatments, although there are a lot which are still in the clinical trial phase which look promising. It won't be cured though, they can prolong useful life and that's about it. It's a very unpredictable cancer, there's a lot they just don't know... It's like living with a ticking time bomb inside you, but you can't see the countdown.

On the bright side, it's one of the few cancers which regresses spontaneously, so it's not all grim. It might kill a vast amount of patients who have metastises - stage IV has a 18% 5 year survival rate - but some of them live for another 20 years before that happens. Some on the other hand, die within weeks of being dx as stage IV. I have people in my survivors support group who have had stage 4 tumors removed many times, including brain mets and are still going strong 20+ years after their original diagnosis! Talk about warriors!

I want to be one of them!

My thoughts and prayers go out to everyone here who is touched by cancer. Every day is truly a gift and even though I'd give anything not to have this, I am also grateful for the wake up call it gave me, I never lose an opportunity to express my love - I can't love my husband and kids hard enough.

Remember, live strong - fight hard!

Me? I'm praying for no mets - cancer can kiss my ass.

Link Posted: 4/16/2006 10:33:45 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Ginger:


Me? I'm praying for no mets - cancer can kiss my ass.




Honey, cancer ain't good enough to kiss your ass...

Let it kiss Hilary's instead.
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 10:47:10 AM EDT

Originally Posted By PlaymoreMinds:

Originally Posted By Ginger:


Me? I'm praying for no mets - cancer can kiss my ass.




Honey, cancer ain't good enough to kiss your ass...

Let it kiss Hilary's instead.



+1  
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 11:03:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/16/2006 2:58:39 PM EDT by cmjohnson]
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 2:03:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By PlaymoreMinds:

Originally Posted By Ginger:


Me? I'm praying for no mets - cancer can kiss my ass.




Honey, cancer ain't good enough to kiss your ass...

Let it kiss Hilary's instead.



I never thought of that - I like the way you think!
Link Posted: 4/17/2006 6:42:51 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/17/2006 6:55:09 AM EDT by lobsterman]
WOW, Ginger,   Thank You you for sharing that with me, us , everyone,  

 yes cancer does touch you and loved one.  
Stay strong,  and you will be in our thoughts and prayers.  And Katie, being half Japanese is Budhist, so you will have two gods lookin out for ya.  seriously though we will be thinking of you and are here.

Thinking of you and everyone else who has been touched by cancer
LOBSTA
Katie and kyle
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 12:50:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pattymcn:

Most likely its more fear on the part of the woman.  If I ever get DXed with breast cancer again I'll have them both cut off.  As much as I enjoy holding men's attention with them, its not worth it in the end.

Patty





The world would indeed be a much poorer place.  Much, much poorer.
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 1:23:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By lobsterman:
WOW, Ginger,   Thank You you for sharing that with me, us , everyone,  

 yes cancer does touch you and loved one.  
Stay strong,  and you will be in our thoughts and prayers.  And Katie, being half Japanese is Budhist, so you will have two gods lookin out for ya.  seriously though we will be thinking of you and are here.

Thinking of you and everyone else who has been touched by cancer
LOBSTA
Katie and kyle



Thanks LOBSTA, my best wishes and prayers go out to you and your Katie. (I'll take all and any prayers I can get, I even added my name to every prayer list I could find, can't hurt, right?)

Cancer is such a difficult, emotive subject, but I strongly feel that if I can reach out to just one person, then sharing my story is worth it. Cancer sucks, people die from it, sure, but a lot of people don't die, there are many, MANY more survivors out there who have fought the beast and won and that is what I carry with me every day. And it is something I try to pass along to people who are dealing with the pain and devastation of a cancer diagnosis.

Hang in there, this too shall pass.
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 1:29:54 PM EDT
Ginger,

As a melanoma survivor myself, you have my sincere empathy.  Prayers on their way.
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 2:25:03 PM EDT
Likewise, Shane, I am so sorry you've had to deal with this beast.
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 2:41:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Ginger:
Likewise, Shane, I am so sorry you've had to deal with this beast.



Thank you, but don't worry about me.  I was very blessed to catch the melanoma early.  I mean a literal miracle.  The follow-up excision showed no residual.

You just worry about taking good care of yourself, Ginger.
Link Posted: 4/19/2006 3:33:24 AM EDT
I'm very happy to hear that!
Link Posted: 4/19/2006 3:44:44 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/19/2006 4:12:03 AM EDT by lobsterman]
hey ginger,

thanks again and take care of yourself.  

NY,.. huh?... Upstate.  That is where Katies family are, were, kinda still the
Grape growing kings of the fingerlakes region.  All there grapes go to Arbor Mist.  It is Beautiful.  I would be there if it were not for the gun laws and the lobstering is very poor in the lakes i hear.
LOBSTA
kyle


Wishing you Our best!!
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