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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 3/27/2006 7:58:22 AM EDT
hello. Friday my brother and I bought a new TV from Video Only, brought it home and set it all up, messed with the settings for a while and figured that was as good as we were going to get it. the picture quality looks as if you've taken the regular image and just blown it up to fit the new tv- things look quite polygonal. Can't really notice any super good quality in the picture, which looks quite grainy at best, as if you're watching nothing but old movies from the 80's. The salesman had said something about "black cable boxes" and how they didn't have digital quality, and if we had one we'd have to get a silver box? is there any truth to this? and would this change the picture quality at all? any help, tips/tricks would be appreciated!!

thanks
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:00:21 AM EDT

Originally Posted By RockoZ:
hello. Friday my brother and I bought a new TV from Video Only, brought it home and set it all up, messed with the settings for a while and figured that was as good as we were going to get it. the picture quality looks as if you've taken the regular image and just blown it up to fit the new tv- things look quite polygonal. Can't really notice any super good quality in the picture, which looks quite grainy at best, as if you're watching nothing but old movies from the 80's. The salesman had said something about "black cable boxes" and how they didn't have digital quality, and if we had one we'd have to get a silver box? is there any truth to this? and would this change the picture quality at all? any help, tips/tricks would be appreciated!!

thanks



You should get the HD box, and even possibly have the TV ISF calibrated by a pro
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:01:43 AM EDT
Sounds like you dont have an HD source.

The TV is only showing a standard cable TV picture, expanded to the size of the screen.

Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:02:21 AM EDT
Make sure the video into the TV is going through S-Video or Component cables, not coax or composite cables. Getting a 1080i signal from a HD box will help a lot.

+1 on the pro settings setup. I had a DVD for that and it helped a lot.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:05:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/27/2006 8:06:29 AM EDT by Gatchaman]
If it's grainy the sharpness setting may be too high. Most people and factory settings bump this up way to high. I always have trouble with this. The best thing to do is get a copy of Aria Home theater www.amazon.com/gp/product/630551982X/qid=1143479065/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_1/002-0617968-8486456?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance&n=130
These are the easiest test patterns, and the video walks you through how to use them.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:07:17 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/27/2006 8:08:54 AM EDT by thelastgunslinger]
You need to get an HD signal from somewhere. You wil need a new cable box or satellite receiver.

Also, if your TV is CRT based, the AVIA Guide to Home Theater is awesome for calibarting the video settings. It is also great for calibrating your audio system as well.


ETA: Damn, someone beat me to Avia while I was typing up my post. it really is useful with CRT based TVs.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:11:02 AM EDT
The set is capable of displaying awesome imagery. Now you just need to feed it a good source. Regular cable sux in quality. Need to find a high def source (cable/satellite). Think of regular tv signals as reloaded Wolf Ammo and your TV as 700PSS. HD cable is like match-grade ammo. One without the other is useless
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:17:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/27/2006 8:18:14 AM EDT by Ineedhelp]
38" LCD on the wall hooked directly into a computer and surround sound system.

Regular TV looks like ass but everything from the computer is a wet dream come true.


IMHO HDTV is not "there" yet.

Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:22:04 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/27/2006 8:23:38 AM EDT by twonami]
Get the HD tuner source hooked up and come back later but yes it will just magnify a crappy analog image.
ETA: the salesman that sold it to you is a idiot for not mentioning a HD tuner and telling you to get a "blackbox"
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:25:19 AM EDT
You need the proper source, and a decent cable.

Then try the AVIA disk, or have a pro come in and calibrate it.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:25:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Ineedhelp:
38" LCD on the wall hooked directly into a computer and surround sound system.

Regular TV looks like ass but everything from the computer is a wet dream come true.


IMHO HDTV is not "there" yet.



You're doing something wrong then. (assuming you have a HD feed going into the monitor)
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:31:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By twonami:

Originally Posted By Ineedhelp:
38" LCD on the wall hooked directly into a computer and surround sound system.

Regular TV looks like ass but everything from the computer is a wet dream come true.


IMHO HDTV is not "there" yet.



You're doing something wrong then. (assuming you have a HD feed going into the monitor)



Yep. 1080i (HDTV) should look as good as or better than the computer.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 8:33:31 AM EDT
First, make sure you have HD source, either HD thru your cable converter, HD thru Direct TV, or locak HD broadcast. HD channels are currently l;imited, but as time goes by, more and more channels will offer their content in HD. Ther are some channels (limited) that will only offer their content in HD.

Second, use the correct cable connections: HDMI is the preferred connection, follow by DVI-D, Components (analog HD, make sure you have 75 Ohm cables. Note HDMI carries audio also, but sources claims it is not as goosd as the Fiber Optics.
The SD connections are all analog: Component (480P), S-Video, Composite (single RCA).

Note, currently the only HD sources are cable, Direct TV, local broadcast, and web.

They are still working on the format of the HD version of th DVD (Blu Ray versus HD-DVD). Both DVDs are planning to launch their products very soon (looks like th e Blu-Ray is winning, the big porn houses state they will adapt Blu-Ray).

Currently the only way to recorder HD are DVR, D-VHS, and on your computer. D-VHS recods thru Component, HDMI recording is currently blocked.

Lastly, stuff to watch for if you plan on the next purchases: HD TV with 1080P (not 1080i), Dolby HD and/or DTS-HD audio (beyond Dolby / DTS 7.1), and more HDV camcorders (forget miniDV, mini DVD camcordetrs).
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:12:22 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/27/2006 9:14:19 AM EDT by 04hemi]
Seeing how you're in Washington, it's mostly served by Comcast Cable, there's a little bit of Adelphia up there too, but we bought them out so it's going to be Comcast shortly. The Vidoe Only tech was somewhat right in what he told you. I am a service tech for Comcast and can help you out a bit here, the black box is a digital converter, but it doesn't receive any HD programming and can't be modified to receive it.

The silver box in reference is the way you need to go, we offer 2 versions of it, just a standard HD box or you can upgrade to the HD Dual Tuner DVR for like $5 more a month I think it is. My personal opinion- get the HD DVR box, it's worth it!

Should you have any picture problems after the upgrade, don't hesitate to call up customer service, and request a service call. There are alot of variables in picture quality that most don't know about.

Good luck.

Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:19:58 AM EDT
Take the TV set back and read a book.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 9:45:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FALCORE:
Take the TV set back and read a book.



are you serious or just being an idiot?

thanks to the rest of you, the info is a great help.
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 5:54:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By bnorman:

Originally Posted By twonami:

Originally Posted By Ineedhelp:
38" LCD on the wall hooked directly into a computer and surround sound system.

Regular TV looks like ass but everything from the computer is a wet dream come true.


IMHO HDTV is not "there" yet.



You're doing something wrong then. (assuming you have a HD feed going into the monitor)



Yep. 1080i (HDTV) should look as good as or better than the computer.



No it shouldn't. 1080i is interlaced, meaning that only 540 of the lines are displayed at a time. PC resolution is 1024 lines (or more) displayed all at once. Way more resolution.

That said, 1080i looks EXCELLENT on my HDTV direct view tube.
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