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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/9/2005 10:14:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2005 10:14:59 PM EDT by 22bad]
I wonder if the "Queen Creek Abduction" guy was an illegal

Border Officials Have Plan for Spreading Word of Child Abductions
By Bob Christie Associated Press Writer
Sep 9, 2005
ap.tbo.com/ap/breaking/MGBMRJR9FDE.html
CHANDLER, Ariz. (AP) - Authorities on both sides of the U.S.-Mexican border said Friday they want to implement a coordinated child abduction notification system.
"We've got an informal agreement now with the Nogales police, but that's not good enough," Arizona Attorney General Terry Goddard said.
"We can't have another situation like the Queen Creek abduction."

In July, two children were abducted from the Phoenix suburb of Queen Creek, allegedly by their father, who escaped into Mexico. The parents of the man's ex-girlfriend and her brother were found shot to death at the children's home.

The suspect was eventually arrested by Mexican authorities near Puerto Vallarta and the children were returned to their mother.

Law enforcement agencies in both countries are not connected electronically, but top officials from nine border states finishing a three-day meeting here said they have agreed on a plan to put top deputies in direct communication so they can quickly spread the word about kidnappings.

They hope to expand the plan later this month into a complete electronic interconnection of their various agencies.

An electronic system linking the police and prosecutors in both nations is extremely important, not just in improving response time to abductions but in stopping vehicle theft, drug smuggling and other crimes, Baja California chief prosecutor Antonio Martinez-Luna said.

During the conference, top officials from Mexico also announced plans to expand to all of Arizona a pilot program under which American officials turn over immigrant smugglers to Mexican authorities for prosecution.

Mexican authorities will be able to prosecute the so-called "coyotes" more easily because their legal system doesn't require witnesses to be present at trial, a deposition or sworn complaint can suffice. The program has been running in California and in the Yuma area.
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