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Posted: 8/22/2004 6:46:52 PM EST
Last Update: Monday, August 23, 2004. 4:12am (AEST)

Bodies of WWI soldiers found in Italian glacier

The preserved bodies of three Austrian soldiers killed in World War I have been found at the foot of an Italian glacier, 86 years after their deaths, a museum in northern Italy said on Sunday.

They were found by Maurizio Vincenzi, the director of the military history museum at the small town of Peio in the Trentino region, member of a mountain rescue team and military history buff.

The bodies were found 3,400 metres up a mountain called San Matteo and are said to be exceptionally well preserved.

They had been spotted by Vincenzi as he scanned the glacier with binoculars and noticed marks on it.

The area was the scene of fighting between Austrian and Italian troops in 1918 and the Austrian soldiers would have belonged to a regiment based at Dimaro nearby.

It is believed that the men died when they were attacked with grenades.

Their bodies have been taken to a morgue in Peio and will be transferred to a military cemetery.

According to Vincenzi it is 80 years since the preserved body of a World War I soldier has been found.
Link Posted: 8/22/2004 6:48:20 PM EST
Ice to see you.
Link Posted: 8/22/2004 6:51:13 PM EST
Just chillin dude....
Link Posted: 8/22/2004 6:52:42 PM EST
cant wait to see that on the discovery channel.
Link Posted: 8/22/2004 6:57:55 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/22/2004 7:00:06 PM EST
Wow.
Link Posted: 8/22/2004 7:01:44 PM EST
They took the chill pill.
Link Posted: 8/22/2004 7:02:40 PM EST
RIP
Link Posted: 8/22/2004 7:21:52 PM EST
Getting buried with honors, by any chance?

- BUCC_Guy
Link Posted: 8/22/2004 7:29:10 PM EST
thats pretty interesting. I'd like to know more about that. I hope the history or discovery channels do, do something on this.
Link Posted: 8/22/2004 7:31:04 PM EST

Originally Posted By mpearcex:
thats pretty interesting. I'd like to know more about that. I hope the history or discovery channels do, do something on this.



+1
Link Posted: 8/22/2004 7:33:31 PM EST

Originally Posted By SteyrAUG:
Dsirepsectful comments aside, pretty interesting.



Chill out
Link Posted: 8/22/2004 7:34:21 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/22/2004 7:34:57 PM EST by ARDOC]
We should put this thread on ice.
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 6:29:06 AM EST
Pretty nasty fighting in the Alps in WWI. Ever read Mark Helprin's "A Soldier in the Great War"?

GunLvr
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 6:36:54 AM EST
3 new C&R's (M1895 Steyr-Mannlicher - I'd guess) about to join the market.
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 7:04:59 AM EST
Imagine fighting in the Alps, or even more strenuous, the Himalyas and Kashmir. Outside Magazine did a story about how it is fighting at 15,000 feet.
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 7:11:54 AM EST
May their soles now rest in peace.
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 7:12:58 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/23/2004 7:14:32 AM EST by PaoloAR15]

Originally Posted By BUCC_Guy:
Getting buried with honors, by any chance?

- BUCC_Guy



Of course. Austrian authorities has been contacted by the Italian ones. I don't know if those Austrian soldiers will be buried in a sacrary for Austrian fallen in Italy or in Austria.

Last time I was on the 1915-1918 war frontline on the Dolomites, there were Austrian Gebirsjagern and Italian Alpini that were restoring toghether trenches and shelters. On the top of a mountain in Val di Landro I saw with my eyes the distances between Austrian and Italian trenches: in a point the frontlines were only 50 or 70 meters distant...
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 7:16:07 AM EST

Originally Posted By 2IDdoc:
They took the chill pill.



That's pretty cold, man.
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 7:17:42 AM EST
I hope they aren't thawed out and turned into Austrian Super Soldiers.
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 7:29:37 AM EST
If the soldiers had Glocks back then, I bet they'd still work.
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 7:33:35 AM EST
The fighting between the Italians and Austrians was particularly bad, even by WWI standards. They lugged artillery up the mountains, in some cases, large pieces that would be considered extremely difficult by todays standards. Funny how 'what is possible' changes when you find that your enemy is doing it...
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 7:33:38 AM EST

Originally Posted By osprey21:
May their soles now rest in peace.



I don't know about their combat boots, but I hope their souls rest in peace.
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 7:36:46 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/23/2004 5:32:58 PM EST by DriftPunch]

Originally Posted By M4-guy:
If the soldiers had Glocks back then, I bet they'd still work.



They would have been equiped with M 95 Mannlichers. I'm not sure who carried sidearms, but they would have been Gasser Revolvers, Styer Hahn 1912s, and Roth Styer M1907s. For the record, the 1907 has a 'safe action' striker like a Glock.

Of these three, I don't have the Gasser, and the only ones I've ever seen were beaten, or the owner thought it was owned by Franz Ferdinand himself.
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 5:31:14 PM EST
Initally, some experts think that these men were killed by a grenade. If that's the case, it would be kind of uncommon. A small caliber mountain artillery piece or mortar would seem more likely. Time will tell.
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 6:50:44 PM EST
Imagine by a quirk of fate, more people know about you now that ever knew you your whole life.
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 6:54:43 PM EST

Originally Posted By SS109:
Imagine by a quirk of fate, more people know about you now that ever knew you your whole life.



Yup, I hope they don't make a mokery of this. These men are not a treasure like the iceman was. Find out who they were, then give them a proper burial.
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 8:14:00 PM EST
interesting. RIP

http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&ie=UTF-8&ncl=www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200408/s1182506.htm

Link Posted: 8/23/2004 8:25:06 PM EST

Originally Posted By BayEagle:
3 new C&R's (M1895 Steyr-Mannlicher - I'd guess) about to join the market.

Now THAT was 'cold'.
Link Posted: 8/24/2004 3:36:36 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/24/2004 3:37:21 AM EST by inferno715]
wow. i wonder what condition their equipment was in? i wonder how many other things like that are waiting to be discovered throughout the world. there's still lots of planes missing from ww2, ships to be found, etc.
Link Posted: 8/24/2004 3:40:15 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/24/2004 3:45:57 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/24/2004 3:46:23 AM EST by Sandguard]
Hopefully this will bring about a thaw in relations.
Link Posted: 8/24/2004 3:50:37 AM EST
It's comforting to know that I won't be burning in Hell all by myself considering some of these comments!
Link Posted: 8/24/2004 3:57:09 AM EST
Hopefully they have some ID or letters that will allow thier families to finally put them to rest.
Link Posted: 8/24/2004 4:09:20 AM EST
http://www.accessexcellence.org/AE/mspot/arc/beattie.html

Here's a link to the autopsies done on three members of the Frankilin Expedition who were buried in perma-frost in the mid' 1840's. They dug these guys up in the early 1990's after being dead and buried for 150 years. The preservation of the bodies was striking.

To autopsy them they had to thaw them. National Geographic had a great special on it at the time. They put the bodies in a a big tent (About the size of a GP Large) and heated it up with stoves. The bodies were placed on the ground inside and allowed to attain "Room temperature" gradually. Creepy as hell to watch because as they thawed they started to move a little as their long frozen joints loosened up.
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