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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/11/2005 1:22:58 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 1:56:23 AM EDT
Damn!

(BTW: great avi, Tom)
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 3:03:18 AM EDT
WOW!! that sucks
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 3:11:37 AM EDT
That'd ruin your day

Mark
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 4:47:23 AM EDT
That won't buff out!!
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 5:06:00 AM EDT

Damn, those guys were calm, cool, and collected.
Quality training really showing in the worst of circumstances.
DaddyDett
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 5:11:40 AM EDT
The only thing that gives away any problem is a very slight elevation in the pilots breathing.

Very nice job.
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 5:17:09 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DaddyDett:
Damn, those guys were calm, cool, and collected.
Quality training really showing in the worst of circumstances.
DaddyDett

Yeah, those guys were good. Hope the ejection didn't screw em up to bad.
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 5:21:40 AM EDT
Damn
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 5:21:59 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 5:24:31 AM EDT


That was a Canadian trainer. Can't remember the designation. They were doing touch and goes when the strike happened. The student up front was uninjured. The IP in the back wasn't so lucky and suffered some busted bones that kept him in the hospital for quite a while.
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 5:27:00 AM EDT
I'm thinking F16 also... but why the fuck waste all that speed/altitude on a 180 deg. (~) turn?
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 5:33:34 AM EDT

I X-Rayed 3 guys that ejected from F-4's or while in the AF.
2 guys had some kind of thoracic spinal damage, mostly compression fractures.
One guy, a WSO at Lakenheath, was riding along smoking a cig, straps loose, when the pilot punched him out without warning. He told me he thought they had flamed-out. This over the North Sea in late Sept..
He struck his left shoulder on the canopy rail on the way out. Shattered his Lt humerus, collar bone, and scapula.
He tread water in the N Sea for 27 mins before the Brits got to him, as he couldnt manage his survival gear. The projected survival time for that time of yr in those waters is under 10 mins.
A couple days after I X-rayed him, we sent him on to Wiesbaden. I have wondered of the yrs how things worked out for him.
Hell of a story to tell his grand-kids.

DaddyDett
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 5:38:08 AM EDT

Originally Posted By RED_5:
I'm thinking F16 also... but why the fuck waste all that speed/altitude on a 180 deg. (~) turn?


Looking at the video, as the nose comes down and settles in to the turn, it looks like alot of buildings ahead/below. Probably was avoiding the occupied areas of the base or neighboring town.
Well done!

Incidently, the first thing out of one of thier mouths was "OH SHIT".
It seems over history, this is the classic first response from military pilots in trouble.
DaddyDett
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 5:49:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
Anyone know what they were flying?

It was apparently a single engine jet, with a crew of two.

The HUD symbology LOOKS right for an F-16, B or D model.

CJ



This was posted awhile back and IIRC it was some type of British built trainer and happened in Canada. I thought it was a F-16 also and was proven wrong. I did a search going back three months and could not find the original thread.
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 5:56:29 AM EDT
The first clue it was not likely an F16 was the language of the computer "Gear Not Down!"
It sounded French in accent.
I don't know who else flies F16's, though.
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 5:56:31 AM EDT
It's not only military pilots.
I have read plenty of civilian aircraft / airline crash transcripts, the first words are either "what the fuck just happened" or "oh shit" when it was serious.

Quite a few of the last words from pilots are "tell so-and-so that I love them".


Originally Posted By DaddyDett:
Incidently, the first thing out of one of thier mouths was "OH SHIT".
It seems over history, this is the classic first response from military pilots in trouble.
DaddyDett

Link Posted: 9/11/2005 5:58:28 AM EDT
Found the details of the crash on-line.


www.airforce.forces.gc.ca/dfs/docs/Fti/CT155202_e.asp

Type: Hawk CT155202

Date: 14 May 2004


Location: Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan

The mission was a navigation trip and part of a conversion syllabus designed to familiarize the Royal Air Force (RAF) student with the NFTC Hawk variant. With the area portion completed, the crew was conducting some proficiency flying at 15 Wing. The IP had just taken control and as the aircraft approached the departure end of Runway 29R, a bird was observed just left of the nose. Both crewmembers heard a "thump", felt vibrations and noted a change in engine pitch. This was followed immediately by audio and caption engine warnings (T6NL&ECA) and high engine temperature indication (660 C).

The IP traded airspeed for altitude, confirmed that engine temperatures remained high, reduced throttle to idle and told the student to "prepare to abandon the aircraft". The aircraft reached a maximum altitude of approximately 3700 MSL (1700 AGL). When the aircraft descended through 3000 MSL the IP transmitted his intention to eject to Moose Jaw tower. After confirming the student was ready, the IP ordered and initiated ejection.

Both occupants cleared the aircraft and descended under parachutes but for less than 30 seconds prior to landing. One crewmember was seriously injured in the sequence and the other received minor injuries. The aircraft was completely destroyed when it crashed about seven seconds later in a farmer's field.

The investigation is on going and focusing on a wide range of issues including the aspects of low and slow speed (below 300 KIAS) engine failure in the CT155 and ejection criteria. Also, the investigation will examine engine performance after bird ingestion and aircrew life support equipment.
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 7:18:45 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 7:25:45 AM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 7:26:38 AM EDT



Bomber
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 7:33:10 AM EDT
The tone of the crew showed professionalism - cool under real pressure at low altitude. Bravo.

CWO
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 7:35:00 AM EDT

Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
I met a man once who flew Phantoms, and had to eject from FOUR of them. The last time was a double bird strike, to both engines, climbing out of low cloud cover right after takeoff. It was one of the
shortest Phantom flights in history.

He walked with two canes and says he's three inches shorter than he used to be. His back x-ray
looks like a derailed train.


CJ




I believe F-4's were equipped with Martin-Baker seats. From what I understand, those seats
were not kind to people outside a very narrow height window.

DaddyDett
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 7:37:46 AM EDT
damn!
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 7:40:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/11/2005 7:41:12 AM EDT by Chairborne]

Originally Posted By DaddyDett:

Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
I met a man once who flew Phantoms, and had to eject from FOUR of them. The last time was a double bird strike, to both engines, climbing out of low cloud cover right after takeoff. It was one of the
shortest Phantom flights in history.

He walked with two canes and says he's three inches shorter than he used to be. His back x-ray
looks like a derailed train.


CJ



I believe F-4's were equipped with Martin-Baker seats. From what I understand, those seats
were not kind to people outside a very narrow height window.

DaddyDett



They were, and they weren't. Didn't call them "Martin Baker Widow Makers" for nothing. One of our crew chiefs was killed by one in a ground mishap, that seat was a POS. I knew a few F-4 guys who had ridden one, and most made out ok afterward except for the broken fingers, ankles, and shoulders that they usually got.
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 7:48:44 AM EDT
"Ahh Jeepers"

Good work guys .
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