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Posted: 10/3/2005 5:39:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/3/2005 5:40:27 PM EDT by Cabby]
www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/bt/tularemia/news/oct0305tularemia.html

Tularemia agent found in DC air, but no cases seen

Oct 3, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Several air sensors detected traces of the tularemia pathogen on the Capitol Mall in Washington, DC, Sep 24 and 25, but no cases of illness have been reported among people who were in the area at the time, according to health officials.

In a Sep 30 message to health agencies, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said environmental air monitors in the Capitol Mall "signaled the low level presence of Francisella tularensis," the bacterium that causes tularemia.

The microbe is one of the six agents considered most likely to be used by terrorists as a biological weapon. But Department of Homeland Security (DHS) officials said the pathogen probably was a natural occurrence and not the result of bioterrorism, according to a Washington Post report.

Tens of thousands of people were on the mall Sep 24 for antiwar demonstrations and the National Book Festival, according to the Post. But no cases or suspected cases of tularemia have been reported, CDC spokesman Von Roebuck told CIDRAP News today.

The air samples that yielded the findings were collected between 10 a.m. Sep 24 and 10 a.m. Sep 25, the Post reported. The air monitors are part of the federal BioWatch program, which monitors the air for pathogens in major cities around the country. The Post said Washington area health officials were notified of the findings on Sep 30.

After tests in Washington detected the pathogen on air filters, further tests were done by the CDC in Atlanta, according to the Post.

Roebuck said today he didn't know yet what quantity of the agent was found or what strain of tularemia it was.

"We're looking to find out if anyone in the medical community has any patients with symptoms that could be similar to tularemia," he said.

The CDC notice said the usual incubation period for the disease is 3 to 5 days, suggesting that anyone exposed around Sep 25 would have become ill by today. But in rare cases symptoms can take longer to appear, the agency said.

The United States had an average of about 124 cases of tularemia per year in the 1990s, most of them occurring in rural areas. Tick bites and handling of infected animals are the most common routes of infection, but people can also contract it from insect bites, eating or drinking contaminated food or water, or inhaling the bacteria, according to the CDC.

The disease can cause several different clinical syndromes, depending on the route of infection. The CDC notice said inhalation of the microbe is most likely to lead to pneumonic, oculoglandular, or oropharyngeal disease. Tularemia does not spread from person to person, and it can be effectively treated with antibiotics. But it can be fatal in some cases.


Does this bother anyone but me?
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 5:40:56 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/3/2005 5:48:39 PM EDT by FortyFiveAutomatic]
tularemia is common in rabbits, IIRC.

"Two subtypes of F. tularensis have been recognized. Type A strains, which have been found only in North America, are more virulent and cause illness that, without treatment, has a 5%-7% mortality rate. Type B strains are less virulent."

That means for those infected, between 5 and 7 out of 100 untreated will die. Doesn't sound that threatening.

Above quote from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00000424.htm
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 5:57:05 PM EDT
I also farted there this past weekend. I had a chimichanga and I just couldnt hold it.....sorry.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 5:57:36 PM EDT
Yea, but why did the biosensors on the mall pick it up?
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:01:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Cabby:
www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/bt/tularemia/news/oct0305tularemia.html

Tularemia agent found in DC air, but no cases seen

Oct 3, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Several air sensors detected traces of the tularemia pathogen on the Capitol Mall in Washington, DC, Sep 24 and 25, but no cases of illness have been reported among people who were in the area at the time, according to health officials.

In a Sep 30 message to health agencies, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said environmental air monitors in the Capitol Mall "signaled the low level presence of Francisella tularensis," the bacterium that causes tularemia.

The microbe is one of the six agents considered most likely to be used by terrorists as a biological weapon. But Department of Homeland Security (DHS) officials said the pathogen probably was a natural occurrence and not the result of bioterrorism, according to a Washington Post report.

Tens of thousands of people were on the mall Sep 24 for antiwar demonstrations and the National Book Festival, according to the Post. But no cases or suspected cases of tularemia have been reported, CDC spokesman Von Roebuck told CIDRAP News today.

The air samples that yielded the findings were collected between 10 a.m. Sep 24 and 10 a.m. Sep 25, the Post reported. The air monitors are part of the federal BioWatch program, which monitors the air for pathogens in major cities around the country. The Post said Washington area health officials were notified of the findings on Sep 30.

After tests in Washington detected the pathogen on air filters, further tests were done by the CDC in Atlanta, according to the Post.

Roebuck said today he didn't know yet what quantity of the agent was found or what strain of tularemia it was.

"We're looking to find out if anyone in the medical community has any patients with symptoms that could be similar to tularemia," he said.

The CDC notice said the usual incubation period for the disease is 3 to 5 days, suggesting that anyone exposed around Sep 25 would have become ill by today. But in rare cases symptoms can take longer to appear, the agency said.

The United States had an average of about 124 cases of tularemia per year in the 1990s, most of them occurring in rural areas. Tick bites and handling of infected animals are the most common routes of infection, but people can also contract it from insect bites, eating or drinking contaminated food or water, or inhaling the bacteria, according to the CDC.

The disease can cause several different clinical syndromes, depending on the route of infection. The CDC notice said inhalation of the microbe is most likely to lead to pneumonic, oculoglandular, or oropharyngeal disease. Tularemia does not spread from person to person, and it can be effectively treated with antibiotics. But it can be fatal in some cases.


Does this bother anyone but me?



Yes, it bothers me as well. If the terrorists were going to hit us with a biological attack then I couldn't think of a nicer group of people to have them hit than the anti war crowd. That would've shoved a sock in Cindy Sheehan's cock holster.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:04:13 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/3/2005 6:04:27 PM EDT by GAcop]
It was probobly just some bacteria that fell off of some of those nasty hippies.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:07:33 PM EDT
Fun. I've been riding the metro this week.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:12:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By GAcop:
It was probobly just some bacteria that fell off of some of those nasty hippies.



No sh*t

One of the things I'll never forget from the 60's is the smell coming from Mr. Ponytail Overalls and Earth Mother after I gave them a ride in my primo '55 Chev. It must have been a week since their last bath and they were all ass-crackin' fumes.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:21:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/3/2005 6:25:02 PM EDT by wildearp]
tularemia=rabbit fever.

APB issued for the usual suspects: Peter Cottontail, Bugs Bunny, and Jessica Rabbit. Easter Bunny is also sought as a "bunny of interest".

Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:31:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Cabby:
Tens of thousands of people were on the mall Sep 24 for antiwar demonstrations and the National Book Festival, according to the Post. But no cases or suspected cases of tularemia have been reported, CDC spokesman Von Roebuck told CIDRAP News today.



DIE HIPPY DIE!!

errr....

never mind.....

Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:34:17 PM EDT
What is the incubation time for this bug?
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 7:05:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By GAcop:
It was probobly just some bacteria that fell off of some of those nasty hippies.

Werd!
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 4:42:45 AM EDT
There's a discussion of this here.

www.curevents.com/vb/showthread.php?t=23828
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 5:34:50 AM EDT
Oh for Pete's sake...


You want to get thousands upon thousands of unwashed, pimple-faced Marxists in one place and NOT expect some disease to be present?




- BG
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 5:44:45 AM EDT
tag
yes it bothers me as well

Link Posted: 10/4/2005 5:51:42 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mayday:
I also farted there this past weekend. I had a chimichanga and I just couldnt hold it.....sorry.




Link Posted: 10/4/2005 7:04:49 AM EDT
http://www.loc.gov/bookfest/index.html
http://www.loc.gov/bookfest/pressrelease.html

Approximately 100,000 people from the Washington metropolitan area and around the country turned out today to participate in the Library of Congress’ fifth annual National Book Festival on the National Mall.

Seventy-five award-winning writers, illustrators and poets were joined by basketball stars, children’s storybook characters, reading promotion partners and book lovers of all ages in various pavilions throughout the festival grounds. The event is organized and sponsored by the Library of Congress and hosted by Laura Bush. This year’s festival also marked the launch of the Library's multiyear initiative to celebrate Creativity Across America.


I am concerned

Link Posted: 10/4/2005 7:25:01 AM EDT

Originally Posted By wildearp:
tularemia=rabbit fever.

APB issued for the usual suspects: Peter Cottontail, Bugs Bunny, and Jessica Rabbit. Easter Bunny is also sought as a "bunny of interest".




Rabbits Of Peace, my ass!!!
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