Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/19/2005 6:10:38 PM EDT
I need some career advice. I have held the same job title for nearly 10 years. I have received nominal raises during that time, but my salary is about $15,000 a year less than colleagues who work for a "sister" company and have the same responsibilities as me. I've worked hard this year and have had many career successes.

How do I ask for a raise and hopefully get my pay closer to my colleagues? I have looked at informal salary surveys on Salary.com and the data confirms what I already know - that I'm underpaid.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:11:57 PM EDT
Find another job?
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:14:09 PM EDT
Rent "American Beauty" and get back to us.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:15:32 PM EDT
Babble incoherently in your managers office while carrying a large pistol mexican carry
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:15:42 PM EDT
I'm serious. And going postal is not an option, so please don't suggest it.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:17:20 PM EDT
You have a lot more bargaining power when you have another job waiting on you.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:17:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By KBaker:
Find another job?




+1
You can ask nicely or prepare to leave and ask with a little more determination
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:19:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 22bad:

Originally Posted By KBaker:
Find another job?




+1
You can ask nicely or prepare to leave and ask with a little more determination



+2

I told my boss that I had found another job and was giving my two weeks notice, and he responded by giving me a $1500 a month raise on the spot. It kept me here.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:21:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By adair_usmc:

Originally Posted By 22bad:

Originally Posted By KBaker:
Find another job?




+1
You can ask nicely or prepare to leave and ask with a little more determination



+2

I told my boss that I had found another job and was giving my two weeks notice, and he responded by giving me a $1500 a month raise on the spot. It kept me here.



Yup, but don't bluff if you aren't willing to leave........use the ask nicely option
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:22:10 PM EDT
Just ask. If they say no, apply at said "sister" company. If they want you goto your boss and say heres my notice.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:22:38 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:23:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By adair_usmc:

Originally Posted By 22bad:

Originally Posted By KBaker:
Find another job?




+1
You can ask nicely or prepare to leave and ask with a little more determination



+2

I told my boss that I had found another job and was giving my two weeks notice, and he responded by giving me a $1500 a month raise on the spot. It kept me here.



This will work.

Two things, don't be surprised/insulted if they say goodbye, because many bosses are more conscious of money than quality workers. I am very good at what I do, and every single time I have told bosses that I found a better job, they told me good luck and I can return any time I want.

None even asked what the raise was.

Knowing this, rule #2 is easy, if you play this card, and they say no, you HAVE to leave, otherwise they know they have you. Forever.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:27:43 PM EDT
I don't want to leave. I like the job, but hate the pay and lack of recognition.

What about taking data to my boss, showing Salary.com surveys and showing him what the "sister" company pays?
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:30:17 PM EDT
If you aint willing to walk out, you have -0- power.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:31:09 PM EDT
This is simple. Just ask your boss for its review and raise time yet.

Ask him about once a week until he gets the picture.

Failing that, find another job.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:31:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Midnight-Sniper:
I don't want to leave. I like the job, but hate the pay and lack of recognition.

What about taking data to my boss, showing Salary.com surveys and showing him what the "sister" company pays?



It doesn't matter what Salary.com says your worth, it matters what your boss thinks you're worth. Since you obviously disagree, I'd say being ready to walk would be your best backup strategy.

As an aside, one of the reasons I left Boise was every single employer I interviewed with in Ada and Canyon counties lowballed me to the point of insult.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:35:29 PM EDT
As an aside, one of the reasons I left Boise was every single employer I interviewed with in Ada and Canyon counties lowballed me to the point of insult.

You said it. The problem is there is always some desperate soul willing to take their shitty offer. Sadly, everyone takes it up the ass when this happens.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:39:28 PM EDT
Do what I do.

Less work


My spill is you get what you pay for.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:40:39 PM EDT
Try talking to your employer about the market value of your position, assuming that it is higher than where you are currently, and ask what you would need to do to earn it.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:43:42 PM EDT
"Boss I have been working my ass off and my productivity is 25% more than everyone else. I think I deserve a 25% raise or a promotion."
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:47:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By zipper:
Do what I do.

Less work


My spill is you get what you pay for.



+1

But don't become too displaced by slacking off all the time. Do the minimal amount of work needed not to be recognized as slacking. Do just enough to stay beneath their radar. That way if they don't give you the raise, you won't feel too bad about it and have plenty of time to look for employment elsewhere that might be harder but pay better.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:52:56 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TheStig:

Originally Posted By zipper:
Do what I do.

Less work


My spill is you get what you pay for.



+1

But don't become too displaced by slacking off all the time. Do the minimal amount of work needed not to be recognized as slacking. Do just enough to stay beneath their radar. That way if they don't give you the raise, you won't feel too bad about it and have plenty of time to look for employment elsewhere that might be harder but pay better.



+1
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:58:50 PM EDT
best way to ask for a raise is when you are holding a job offer from that "sister" company.

Seriously, you ask for a raise when you are holding that job offer you are golden. You tell them you really like the company and that you don't want to leave and that you have a lot to offer but you have to do what's best for your family.

If they say piss off, you walk and take the higher offer at the other company.

Best way to ask for a raise.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 7:05:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By VTHOKIESHOOTER:
"Boss I have been working my ass off and my productivity is 25% more than everyone else. I think I deserve a 25% raise or a promotion."




YEA RIGHT:
Gotcha by the balls they are getting the work out of you now so why should they pay you more???
Corprate America SUCKS


+1 to the gotta still do a little work, Like clean up after the other monkeys who are always screwing shit up.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 7:08:51 PM EDT
"If you ever wanna see your family alive again..."
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 7:12:43 PM EDT
Maybe he is paying you what he thinks you are worth now, ASK HIM
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 7:13:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Midnight-Sniper:
I need some career advice. I have held the same job title for nearly 10 years. I have received nominal raises during that time, but my salary is about $15,000 a year less than colleagues who work for a "sister" company and have the same responsibilities as me. I've worked hard this year and have had many career successes.

How do I ask for a raise and hopefully get my pay closer to my colleagues? I have looked at informal salary surveys on Salary.com and the data confirms what I already know - that I'm underpaid.



How does the rest of the job stack up compared to your collegues? What exactly do you do? Money isn't everything. I'd rather have less money and more freedom or time off. Are you easily replaceable?

You must consider those items and look at your contribution to profibility. Are you working to make the company more money or are you working to meet your goals and keep your job?
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 7:14:24 PM EDT
Definitely don't bluff the "or else" option......you will be worse off in the end. I suggest that you sit down with the boss man and explain your reasoning. If he disagrees, ask him politely to explain. Adult reasoning is always far superior to jumping up and down/going postal. I am in the same situation right now with my job and I already know what I will say during my review on October 5. If you need anything else or would like me to elaborate on my plan of action, just ask.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 7:24:59 PM EDT
If you're not willing to leave, your employer has no incentive to give you a raise.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 7:32:45 PM EDT
How does the rest of the job stack up compared to your collegues? What exactly do you do? Money isn't everything. I'd rather have less money and more freedom or time off. Are you easily replaceable?

You must consider those items and look at your contribution to profibility. Are you working to make the company more money or are you working to meet your goals and keep your job?


I don't want to go into a lot of detail, but the company spent a considerable amount of money training me over the years. I have a good reputation in the industry and am well known. I did have a lucrative offer from a company in another city, but turned it down. At the time, it was better for my family to remain here.

I'm extremely loyal to my company and frequently put in extra time at no charge. Like I said, the only thing I don't like is the pay. I want parity.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 7:36:14 PM EDT
I told my previous employer that I was underpaid, and that he had 30 days to respond. 16 days later I tendered my resignation and two weeks' notice. 30 days after my "ultimatum" I started my current job.

In my case, the money at the previous place was not that bad, but the position and the work were not really good for my career, long-term. I basically told the old place that I either needed to change my position to be more in keeping with my career goals or I'd find someplace more suited to what I wanted to be doing. I don't really consider what I did to be bluffing, as I really wanted to go. I was not surprised that the former employer didn't counter-offer, and they weren't surprised when I left. They wish they had me now, but I'm certainly not sorry I left! They're in deep shit right now, and I'm just glad I got out before my career got sucked down the tubes with everyone else's.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 8:26:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/19/2005 8:28:01 PM EDT by Spudgunner]
There are some good answers to your questions here; however, here's another way to look at it... Consider your long term goals. Can you get there from here (where you are presently)? If the answer is no and the reason is lack of funds it would seem your course is pretty clear unless you want to change long term goals.

This bears repeating--> "money isn't everything". If your present employer compensates you better in other ways (e.g. vacation, training, telecommuting, whatever,...) then perhaps you aren't so underpayed after all. Compensation is what you want to compare, not just $$$...which is simply a component of compensation.

Good luck!
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 8:56:31 PM EDT

If you aint willing to walk out, you have -0- power.


Exactly. Don't bother negotiating unless you can do so from a position of strength.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 9:19:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Midnight-Sniper:
How does the rest of the job stack up compared to your collegues? What exactly do you do? Money isn't everything. I'd rather have less money and more freedom or time off. Are you easily replaceable?

You must consider those items and look at your contribution to profibility. Are you working to make the company more money or are you working to meet your goals and keep your job?


I don't want to go into a lot of detail, but the company spent a considerable amount of money training me over the years. I have a good reputation in the industry and am well known. I did have a lucrative offer from a company in another city, but turned it down. At the time, it was better for my family to remain here.

I'm extremely loyal to my company and frequently put in extra time at no charge. Like I said, the only thing I don't like is the pay. I want parity.



Let's see. Your boss knows that you will accept lower pay, and put in unpaid overtime to boot, so his incentive to give you more money is what, exactly? There is another name for "loyalty" -- it is called "sucker". Wait till you need one of those unpaid hours back because your kid is sick or something and see what they tell you -- "What unpaid overtime?" First rule, never put in unpaid overtime because that's part of your life that you will never get back and it certainly won't get you the gratitude it should. I don't care how nice your boss is, you are screwing yourself.

You will get a two percent raise forever unless you decide to change companies -- or give your employer an ultimatum. Get another job lined up and prepare to move. Then tell your boss and give him a choice. Salary surveys and all the rest don't mean jack shit until you do that.

But, remember, you can only do that routine a maximum of once before you are going to have to take the other offer. It may get your raise now but it poisons the relationship forever. You can't go back and do that every six months to keep your salary in parity.
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 10:25:16 PM EDT
Just go here and get yurself an MBA
www.ashwooduniversity.net/

You can even select your GPA and graduation date here!
www.ashwooduniversity.net/AU/eval_order.aspx?UNPRCODE=6
Top Top