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Posted: 11/15/2009 11:24:55 AM EDT
So what do you use?  I have an old crappy walmart set of knives and its time to move up.  Want best quality that will last a while.

I've been lookin at Wusthof Ikon but they're pretty expensive although they'd probably last forever if not abused.

Link Posted: 11/15/2009 12:58:19 PM EDT


Most of the "higher" line of culinary knives are close to equal in terms of quality.



Trident, Henkel, Wustoff, are all top of the line brands.



Mundial are Henkels that are produced in Brazil.



The things to look for are the ergonomics of the handles, the construction of the handles, durawood, versus plastic or rubber.



The term Solingen steel on the blade is a sign of a good steel being used for the blade.

Rostrfrei denotes a high carbon, stainless added to the blade to prevent rusting as opposed to strict carbon blades which, being softer are easier to sharpen, and quicker to loose an edge, will rust.



There are some other brands of knives to look at, F. Dick, and Felix are two brands which, being lower in cost can compete with the big boys in terms of quality.



Forschner, Victronox, Sabbatier, are also good quality for the money knives. Dexter is another company who are know producing knives with a higher carbon content in their knives.



Just my .02









Link Posted: 11/15/2009 12:58:54 PM EDT
inexpensive ones from a restaurant supply store
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 1:01:02 PM EDT
There is no best, it comes down to personal prefernce.  I work in a professional kitchen, and have used a lot of high quality knives, and I think bang for the buck, Globals are the way to go.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 1:01:45 PM EDT
Best Production Knives: Wusthof, Shun

(I say "production" beause there are some amazing hand-made ones you can get, but they're so specialty and expensive that it's cost prohibitive to consider for everyday kitchen use)

Global is nowhere near the top for me. I've seen too many fail (literally split in half) from standard use.
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 1:07:50 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/15/2009 1:08:45 PM EDT by fishngrits]
In over ten years of use by me and other chefs I work with, I've never seen a Global split in half, or otherwise have a structural defect, and they've been through more than any home cook will ever put them through in a lifetime of use.  The only thing I've seen happen to them is a broken tip from being dropped, which is a user mistake, but that would happen to any knife.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 1:09:00 PM EDT
Tag.
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 1:09:48 PM EDT
I personally think Global knives are the best.
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 1:14:07 PM EDT
I have a set of Cutco that was given to me years ago and I'm still happy with them.  The scissors will cut a penny in half.
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 1:15:20 PM EDT
wustof, shun, global, MAC or anything from japanesechefsknife.com
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 1:17:22 PM EDT
Ginsu
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 1:18:18 PM EDT
Shun
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 1:20:49 PM EDT
I like my Shun knives. Amazon has some great sales on the occasionally.
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 1:22:58 PM EDT


Dexter-Russell......can be had for less that $50 at your local restaurant supply.
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 1:41:50 PM EDT
Hell of a deal on a Henckels set right here.

This is what I got my dad and stepmom for Christmas this year, and I think I did pretty good.
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 1:48:50 PM EDT
Ronco

/thread
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 1:53:36 PM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 1:55:54 PM EDT
I mostly use Chef's Choice Trizor 10x Professional in my kitchen. They're fully forged, Rockwell tested at 60, and MADE IN AMERICA!
Fabulous knives of very high quality. They ain't cheap but with proper care they will outlast me.

For de-boning and basic butchering I use a combination of commercial quality butchering knives like Forschner, F. Dick, Mundial, and Tramontina. All of the above can be found for very reasonable prices and don't need to be super high-end. They won't last forever but they are speciality knives and I take excellent care of all my cutlery.

Whatever you decide on make sure you buy a good core set that includes an 8" or 10" Chef's knife, a pairing knife, and utility size knife. You can always add other knives to the set later but don't skimp on the core!

Good luck!
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 1:56:04 PM EDT
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 1:57:33 PM EDT
Global or Shun.
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 1:58:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/15/2009 2:09:21 PM EDT by Survivital]
after much research, I ended up with this working combo. It's great for my wannabe chef kitchen:

Suisin Inox Yo-Deba 210mm (thick fish/chicken tool) really stout and quarters bird and breaks down big fish easily

Misono UX-10 Gyuto 240mm (general use chef knife) stainless and really easy to handle. great steel

Shun Classic Wide Santoku 7" (veg prep and chopper de-lux) great for potatoes and other heavy vegetable prep

Masamoto VG-10 Petty 150mm (slicer/utilty) sharp as hell and handy for just about anything

Shun Classic Paring 4.5" (paring knife) blade design will handle most small tasks. really great for fruit and small vegi prep

Henckels bread knife 8" (bread/ frozen stuff) cheap, but sturdy. will be replaced with a Gude (hopefully)

I also use a Hand American Borosite hone to keep the edges up. It's got a cool leather sheath and borosite is better than a steel IMHO.  Hope that helps. Prices vary depending on brand and grade, but that setup has done everything I've needed. Just a basic lineup.  Surv.
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 2:07:07 PM EDT
Wusthof
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 2:11:31 PM EDT
I am sure there are better blades, but I like using Forschner blades the best. The handles fit my hands well.

I used to fillet tons of fish with them. They were all I used and now they are what I use at home.

Link Posted: 11/15/2009 2:11:33 PM EDT
I think we just did this a week or two ago for someone else.



I use Global.




Many believe they are the best.





Link Posted: 11/15/2009 2:14:15 PM EDT
Originally Posted By 50-140:
Most of the "higher" line of culinary knives are close to equal in terms of quality.

Trident, Henkel, Wustoff, are all top of the line brands.

Mundial are Henkels that are produced in Brazil.

The things to look for are the ergonomics of the handles, the construction of the handles, durawood, versus plastic or rubber.

The term Solingen steel on the blade is a sign of a good steel being used for the blade.
Rostrfrei denotes a high carbon, stainless added to the blade to prevent rusting as opposed to strict carbon blades which, being softer are easier to sharpen, and quicker to loose an edge, will rust.

There are some other brands of knives to look at, F. Dick, and Felix are two brands which, being lower in cost can compete with the big boys in terms of quality.

Forschner, Victronox, Sabbatier, are also good quality for the money knives. Dexter is another company who are know producing knives with a higher carbon content in their knives.

Just my .02






Doesn't Solingen mean they have to be made in Solingen, Germany?
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 2:20:06 PM EDT




Originally Posted By gaspain:

wustof, shun, global, MAC or anything from japanesechefsknife.com




This. I love my Shuns
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 2:30:04 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/15/2009 2:57:55 PM EDT by MonkeyGrip]
Look for something with a Rockwell C hardness of above about 55.  This is why Shun, MAC, Global and most Japanese knives are better than most European and US knives wihch will have a generally lower hardness, and thus won't hold and edge as long.  

I like my MAC knives, which a bit cheaper than others for the same hardness (58+), and I got a couple Messermister Asia Precision Series knives which are AUS8, for a great price, which are good, I've got a Global which is great.  My best knife is a handmade Japanese Santoku made by Shinichi Watanabe

For good kitchen knives real cheap, get some of the carbon steel Old Hickory knives by Ontario.  I have severeral and they're great, but do rust easily.  I just sand the rust off.  The carbon streel sharpens really fastm easily and sharp, and holds a good edge.  $6 for a paring knife.  Get 3 and always have one sharp.  The boning knives are realing good for...well, actual boning of meat, because the carbon steel is so much easier to re-sharpen than stainless.  It kills me to touch my hard earned edge of a quality stainless knife to a meat bone, so the Old Hickory 6-in Boner is one of my favorites, for boning work.  To bad they don't sell the long chef's knives anymore.  I got two, and I really like them, especially if I have to do something that I know will cause a need for resharpening, like carving a turkey on a ceramic plate.  

There are several good knife vendors, but one I like is The Knife Merchant because there is a lot of good info there as well selection.  For an all-around, must have kitchen knife, at the best price (above that of the Old Hickories), I recommend the MAC UK-60      6” Chef’s  Utility Knife for $39.  It was highly recommended by a guy via a knife forums website who has made his living selling and sharpening knives for many years, and who has proved the performace of this economically priced knife by taking knives to soup-kitches were he volunteers, and letting other volunteers test various knives.  This is the knife I've had in my kitchen for years, and it wil do it all.  If I only had one, this would be it.  

I've got and tried enough of the softer steel kitchen knives, like Forshner, Victorianox, Tramontina to know that they just don't hold and edge well enough to avoid frustration.  Rockwell C of at least 56.  Better 57+.  The inner steel of the Wantanabe Santoku (it's a katana like sandwich) is as high as RC 64! which is why it holds an awesome edge so well.  Just don't use it as a pry bar.   Use your cheap knife for that.
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 2:32:37 PM EDT
cutco are great knives. My favorite in the drawer. holds an edge like none other. My sister had one for over thirty years and when it broke, they replaced it for free.
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 2:44:20 PM EDT
Originally Posted By MonkeyGrip:
Look for something with a Rockwell C hardness of above about 55.  This is why Shun, MAC, Global and most Japanese knives are better than most European and US knives wihch will have a generally lower hardness, and thus won't hold and edge as long.  

I like my MAC knives, which a bit cheaper than others for the same hardness (58+), and I got a couple Messermister Asia Precision Series knives which are AUS8, for a great price, which are good, I've got a Global which is great.  My best knife is a handmade Japanese Santoku made by Shinichi Watanabe

For good kitchen knives real cheap, get some of the carbon steel Old Hickory knives by Ontario.  I have severeral and they're great, but do rust easily.  I just sand the rust off.  The carbon streel sharpens really fastm easily and sharp, and holds a good edge.  $6 for a paring knife.  Get 3 and always have one sharp.  The boning knives are realing good for...well, actual boning of meat, because the carbon steel is so much easier to re-sharpen than stainless.  It kills me to touch my hard earned edge of a quality stainless knife to a meat bone, so the Old Hickory 6-in Boner is one of my favorites, for boning work.  To bad they don't sell the long chef's knives anymore.  I got two, and I really like them, especially if I have to do something that I know will cause a need for resharpening, like carving a turkey on a ceramic plate.  

There are several good knife vendors, but one I like is The Knife Merchant because there is a lot of good info there as well selection.  For an all-around, must have kitchen knife, at the best price (above that of the Old Hickories), I recommend the MAC UK-60      6” Chef’s  Utility Knife for $39.  It was highly recommended by a guy via a knife forums website who has made his living selling and sharpening knives for many years, and who has proved the performace of this economically priced knife by taking knives to soup-kitches were he volunteers, and letting other volunteers test various knives.  This is the knife I've had in my kitchen for years, and it wil do it all.  If I only had one, this would be it.  




Only thing I don't like about the Old Hickory line is that the wood handles are porous and can't be sanitized.  I generally like to soak my knives in a mild bleach solution after I've been cutting up raw chicken, etc.

The steel is great, though.
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 3:44:34 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/15/2009 3:45:14 PM EDT by PeculiarSatyr]
Originally Posted By MonkeyGrip:
Look for something with a Rockwell C hardness of above about 55.  This is why Shun, MAC, Global and most Japanese knives are better than most European and US knives wihch will have a generally lower hardness, and thus won't hold and edge as long.  

I like my MAC knives, which a bit cheaper than others for the same hardness (58+), and I got a couple Messermister Asia Precision Series knives which are AUS8, for a great price, which are good, I've got a Global which is great.  My best knife is a handmade Japanese Santoku made by Shinichi Watanabe

For good kitchen knives real cheap, get some of the carbon steel Old Hickory knives by Ontario.  I have severeral and they're great, but do rust easily.  I just sand the rust off.  The carbon streel sharpens really fastm easily and sharp, and holds a good edge.  $6 for a paring knife.  Get 3 and always have one sharp.  The boning knives are realing good for...well, actual boning of meat, because the carbon steel is so much easier to re-sharpen than stainless.  It kills me to touch my hard earned edge of a quality stainless knife to a meat bone, so the Old Hickory 6-in Boner is one of my favorites, for boning work.  To bad they don't sell the long chef's knives anymore.  I got two, and I really like them, especially if I have to do something that I know will cause a need for resharpening, like carving a turkey on a ceramic plate.  

There are several good knife vendors, but one I like is The Knife Merchant because there is a lot of good info there as well selection.  For an all-around, must have kitchen knife, at the best price (above that of the Old Hickories), I recommend the MAC UK-60      6” Chef’s  Utility Knife for $39.  It was highly recommended by a guy via a knife forums website who has made his living selling and sharpening knives for many years, and who has proved the performace of this economically priced knife by taking knives to soup-kitches were he volunteers, and letting other volunteers test various knives.  This is the knife I've had in my kitchen for years, and it wil do it all.  If I only had one, this would be it.  

I've got and tried enough of the softer steel kitchen knives, like Forshner, Victorianox, Tramontina to know that they just don't hold and edge well enough to avoid frustration.  Rockwell C of at least 56.  Better 57+.  The inner steel of the Wantanabe Santoku (it's a katana like sandwich) is as high as RC 64! which is why it holds an awesome edge so well.  Just don't use it as a pry bar.   Use your cheap knife for that.


I really Like the knife merchant Website you linked.   I'll probably get a big knife block with a MAC UK-60 and a couple other knives and just add on as I go as I dont have a ton of money to spend on a set and mixing and matching sounds fun.

If anyone has any knives they'd like to reccomend for my knife block, GO.

Link Posted: 11/15/2009 3:50:32 PM EDT
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 3:56:50 PM EDT
Wustoff for the win.



I got my wife one for Christmas last year.  Just like anything else of quality, buy one and slowly add to your collection.  Unlike the Walmart knives, they'll be around for years and years.

Link Posted: 11/15/2009 4:03:17 PM EDT
Originally Posted By PeculiarSatyr:
So what do you use?  I have an old crappy walmart set of knives and its time to move up.  Want best quality that will last a while.

I've been lookin at Wusthof Ikon but they're pretty expensive although they'd probably last forever if not abused.



Where in Ohio are you?  If you're anywhere near Dover, take a look at Warther.  Handmade in Ohio by the Warther family.  They're great knives.  We have a set and regularly give them as gifts.
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 4:05:18 PM EDT
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 4:09:59 PM EDT
Another Cutco user here......
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 4:21:10 PM EDT
I use Shun. I only have 4 of them so far.
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 4:23:21 PM EDT
snap-on
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 4:33:03 PM EDT
Global.





Link Posted: 11/15/2009 4:38:28 PM EDT
Tag.
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 4:41:05 PM EDT
I love my Wustoff knives.
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 4:41:57 PM EDT
I have Wusthof, but if I had it to do over again, I'd go to a restaurant supply store and get Forschner.  Cook's Illustrated says Forscher (Victorinox) knives are as good as or better than knives costing four or five times as much.
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 4:42:13 PM EDT
I have shun & al mar, both are great.

-JTP
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 4:43:47 PM EDT
My Benchmade folder may or may not be my only sharp pointy thing.







Link Posted: 11/15/2009 4:45:33 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Milquetoast:
I have Wusthof, but if I had it to do over again, I'd go to a restaurant supply store and get Forschner.  Cook's Illustrated says Forscher (Victorinox) knives are as good as or better than knives costing four or five times as much.


Forschner's are O.K., until you have to sharpen them.  The higher grade knives are easier to put a good edge on.


Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 4:48:20 PM EDT
Global's are great but these are better:
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 4:52:41 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ThePitbullofLove:
Global.

http://images49.fotki.com/v855/photos/2/28682/7042651/IMG_0936-vi.jpg


are those handles comfortable?  they really don't look like it.

Link Posted: 11/15/2009 5:01:18 PM EDT
Originally Posted By No-Worries:
Originally Posted By 50-140:
Most of the "higher" line of culinary knives are close to equal in terms of quality.

Trident, Henkel, Wustoff, are all top of the line brands.

Mundial are Henkels that are produced in Brazil.

The things to look for are the ergonomics of the handles, the construction of the handles, durawood, versus plastic or rubber.

The term Solingen steel on the blade is a sign of a good steel being used for the blade.
Rostrfrei denotes a high carbon, stainless added to the blade to prevent rusting as opposed to strict carbon blades which, being softer are easier to sharpen, and quicker to loose an edge, will rust.

There are some other brands of knives to look at, F. Dick, and Felix are two brands which, being lower in cost can compete with the big boys in terms of quality.

Forschner, Victronox, Sabbatier, are also good quality for the money knives. Dexter is another company who are know producing knives with a higher carbon content in their knives.

Just my .02






Doesn't Solingen mean they have to be made in Solingen, Germany?


I think it means they are made there specifically with their steel. At least that is my understanding.
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 5:58:46 PM EDT
Does anyone have an opinion, or ever use, Al Mar cutlery?
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 6:15:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/15/2009 6:15:55 PM EDT by FB41]
I've got a 4.75 Al Mar utility knife that is one of the sharpest knives I've owned. Its a bitch to resharpen, but it holds an edge for damn near ever.

I also use a Tramontina kitchen set for a lot of stuff. They hold an edge fairly well and sharpen easily.

I'm a big fan of Old Hickory knives, too. They were the first kitchen knoves I owned. I found out if you stab an onion with them and let them sit for a couple hours, the blades will "blue" and they don't rust quite as quick. I also soak the handles in thinned down spar varnish and then card them down once they dry. Makes the wood impervious to crud for a long time.
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 6:25:44 PM EDT
I love my shuns with the ergo handle for righties.  I have done a lot of fishing in my life and still spearfish a lot, and I use Dexters for my workhorse fish cleaning knives.  I have a breaker, 3 of their fillet knives and a serrated fillet knife, absolutely love them.
Link Posted: 11/15/2009 6:35:21 PM EDT
i wish i had some ceramic knives myself...except for maybe a steel cleaver
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